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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: January ::
Re: Shakespeare's Handwriting
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0162  Thursday, 30 January 2003

[1]     From:   Paul Werstine <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jan 2003 11:18:50 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0159 Shakespeare's Handwriting

[2]     From:   Roy Flannagan <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jan 2003 11:21:00 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0159 Shakespeare's Handwriting

[3]     From:   Dave Johnson <
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 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jan 2003 07:43:32 -1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0159 Shakespeare's Handwriting

[4]     From:   John W. Kennedy <
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 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jan 2003 17:51:39 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0159 Shakespeare's Handwritin

[5]     From:   Russell MacKenzie Fehr <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jan 2003 22:50:25 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0159 Shakespeare's Handwriting


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Werstine <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jan 2003 11:18:50 -0500
Subject: 14.0159 Shakespeare's Handwriting
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0159 Shakespeare's Handwriting

Mike LoMonico <
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 > asks,

>Does anyone know where (online) I can get a facsimile of the passage
>from "Sir Thomas More" that purportedly is in Shakespeare's hand?  And
>can anyone explain why scholars seem to agree that this is Shakespeare's
>hand?

J. S. Farmer produced a facsimile of the MS in 1910 in the series "Tudor
Facsimile Texts."

Scholars do <not> seem to agree that the three Hand-D pages are in
Shakespeare Hand.  Most are cautious enough to say only that it may be
in his hand; some influential sceptics are Scott McMillin, who has a
book on the MS, and Michael Hays, who had a very fine piece in
<Shakespeare Studies> almost 30 years ago now.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roy Flannagan <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jan 2003 11:21:00 -0500
Subject: 14.0159 Shakespeare's Handwriting
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0159 Shakespeare's Handwriting

Try John Jones, Shakespeare at Work (Oxford: Clarendon, 1995).

Roy Flannagan

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dave Johnson <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jan 2003 07:43:32 -1000
Subject: 14.0159 Shakespeare's Handwriting
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0159 Shakespeare's Handwriting

Reproductions of Hand D, and a discussion of the Thomas More or Moore
play and the likelihood of attribution of Hand D to Shakespeare, are
found in the Riverside Shakespeare, I believe at pps. 1683 through
1700.  Professor Marie Borroff also discusses this issue in a VHS
lecture in a Yale series.

Aloha,
Dave Johnson

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John W. Kennedy <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jan 2003 17:51:39 -0500
Subject: 14.0159 Shakespeare's Handwriting
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0159 Shakespeare's Handwriting

I don't know of any on-line facsimile.  A summary of the methods used is
at http://www.shakespeareauthorship.com/more.html.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Russell MacKenzie Fehr <
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Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jan 2003 22:50:25 EST
Subject: 14.0159 Shakespeare's Handwriting
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0159 Shakespeare's Handwriting

There's a combination of reasons why scholars suggest that Shakespeare
was Hand D in "Sir Thomas More". First, the handwriting resembles that
of all of Shakespeare's known writings (albeit that's only 14 words, 12
of which are the same two words over and over). Another reason is that
some of the weird spellings used ("argo" for ergo, "Iarman" for German,
"a leven" for eleven) are used by Shakespeare (and, such as with
"scilens" for silence, only by Shakespeare). Finally, in content, some
of the form used appears in other Shakespearian work (the opening lines,
for example, resemble the Jack Cade scenes in 2 Henry VI).

I don't know if the section he wrote is available online, but "The
Riverside Shakespeare", in both editions, includes a facsimile of it.
(It's in fairly bad shape, especially the first of the three pages).

Hope this helps.

Russell MacKenzie Fehr

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