2003

Re: Questions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.035  Tuesday, 7 January 2003

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 06 Jan 2003 12:21:32 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.030 Re: Questions

[2]     From:   Ted Dykstra <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 6 Jan 2003 11:55:10 EST
        Subj:   re "Questions"

[3]     From:   James Conlan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 07 Jan 2003 01:40:13 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.030 Re: Questions


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 06 Jan 2003 12:21:32 -0400
Subject: 14.030 Re: Questions
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.030 Re: Questions

I'd like to thank Bob Grumman for noting that the difficulties of
understanding historical personages are similar to the problems of
understanding each other in our own time:

>No one can know exactly how it is or was like for anyone else at any
>time, but--since we're human beings--it's possible for those of us with
>any kind of imagination to know well enough what life was like for any
>other human beings we know as well as we know the Elizabethans.

While obviously there are cultural differences, and these can lead to
misunderstandings, the greater distinction between people is the
existential distinction between self and other.  This fundamental
non-coincidence is, Levinas argues, the source of time and therefore of
historicity.

Yours,
Sean.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ted Dykstra <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 6 Jan 2003 11:55:10 EST
Subject:        re "Questions"

Because the leaders of civilization FOR THE MOST PART (thus far) have
been men, we associate, understandably, the qualities of a leader with
masculinity. We joke about Thatcher and Liz 1 being men because they
were such strong leaders, thus they must be "masculine women". THAT is
the error in our thinking. The world will always be full of very
masculine men and very feminine women who can't lead anyone anywhere.
What is evident to me is that a leader acts like a leader, not like a
man or a woman.  If we evolve further as a race (and yes, that's very
doubtful) we will less and less associate leadership with masculinity
and more and more associate it with what it is: leadership.

Submissively,
Ted Dykstra

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Conlan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 07 Jan 2003 01:40:13 +0000
Subject: 14.030 Re: Questions
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.030 Re: Questions

Regarding the institutional patriarchy and the characterization of women
by the medieval intellectual tradition, see R. Howard Bloch, _Medieval
Misogynies_. Carolyn Walker Bynum's _Holy Feast and Holy Fast_ also
provides an eye-opening look at the way feminine virtue and liberation
was once imagined and embraced.  Whether this medieval tradition is
identical to the present definition of "patriarchy" and "liberation" is
an interesting question that might have us talking with rather than at
or past each other.

Regarding the ability of persons to recover the historical past, perhaps
we should consider the fact that scientists have discovered that the
common notion that we will our physical actions before they occur is
incorrect: actually, the decision that we will our own movements is a
split-second interpretation of actions that have already occurred - even
if these actions are produced by outside stimuli.  [See the Science
Times section of last Tuesday's _New York Times_].  As the immediate
present most personal to us is, in fact, an interpretation of the past
based on a summary of empirical evidence that exists in the imaginative
realm, we should admit no impediment to the possibility that scholars,
with more careful consideration, can arrive at similar hypotheses and
imaginative engagements of the empirical evidence that survives from the
more distant past.

Regarding R.A. Cantrell's position that "the Supreme governor of the
Church and the Queen regnant was never allowed the style 'head'," I am
confused: Is Professor Cantrell refusing to admit Pope Joan, John Knox's
railings against ruling queens, and the Oath of Supremacy that
Shakespeare's father refused to take into evidence?  Is he declaring
that the analogy of a ruling king to the head as the commonwealth is to
the body that James VI of Scotland articulates both in _The True Lawe of
Free Monarchies or the Reciprocal and Mutuall Dutie betwixt a free King,
and his Natural Subiectes_ (Edinburgh, Robert Waldegrave, 1598) [*14409]
and later, once doubly crowned, in "A Speech to the Lords and Commons of
the Parliament at White-Hall on Wednesday the xxi of March anno, 1609."
[pp. 527-548 in James I, _Political Works_ (London, 1616),] would not
have applied to those "free princes" from whom James inherited two
thrones?  Or is Professor Cantrell merely claiming that Ruling Queens
were not styled "head" in correspondence, epistolary dedications, and
formal occasions by ambassadors and heralds, but "Most
Noble Princes" or "Most Grave Princes" exactly like their male
counterparts?

Happy Three Kings' Day,
J. P. Conlan

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Re: Lovely Garnish

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.034  Tuesday, 7 January 2003

From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Mon, 06 Jan 2003 12:15:37 -0400
Subject: 14.025 Lovely Garnish
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.025 Lovely Garnish

There are two good reasons for Jessica to dress like a boy:

1. The actor was a boy, and would have been more comfortable in boy's
clothing whenever possible.  Especially if he has to climb out of a
window.

2. Changing gender is a particularly effective disguise, I should
think.  Anyone looking for Jessica would be looking for a girl.

Cheers,
Sean.

_______________________________________________________________
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Re: Shakespeare's Handwriting

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.032  Tuesday, 7 January 2003

[1]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 06 Jan 2003 10:55:39 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.024 Shakespeare's Handwriting

[2]     From:   Christine Gray <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 6 Jan 2003 12:19:35 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.024 Shakespeare's Handwriting

[3]     From:   Ward Elliott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 06 Jan 2003 15:45:51 -0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.024 Shakespeare's Handwriting


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 06 Jan 2003 10:55:39 -0500
Subject: 14.024 Shakespeare's Handwriting
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.024 Shakespeare's Handwriting

Jonathan Goldberg's book, Shakespeare's Hand is just out.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Gray <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 6 Jan 2003 12:19:35 -0500
Subject: 14.024 Shakespeare's Handwriting
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.024 Shakespeare's Handwriting

Whitt, I copied this message from the H-Albion list.  Mr. Postles is
quite involved in work on 16th, 17th, and 18th c. handwriting.

He might be of help to you regarding Shakespeare's handwriting.

Christine Gray in Baltimore

Below is his message.

******
From Dave Postles (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Subject: image of MS

In addition to the two receipts which I previously put up for people to
download for their own use, I now put up a lease for possession (lease
for a year) for the same purpose.  Sadly, as I bought it, I do not have
the release (of the lease and release).  I have put up several images:

http://www.le.ac.uk/elh/pot/img3/1679.jpg is as much of the doc as I
could scan on an A4 flatbed scanner

http://www.le.ac.uk/elh/pot/img3/1679ca.jpg illustrates the strapwork on
the initial T and also the plica at the foot

http://www.le.ac.uk/elh/pot/img3/1679b.jpg illustrates the plica and the
seal tag

http://www.le.ac.uk/elh/pot/img3/1679c.jpg illustrates the endorsement
('livery of seisin')

As before, this will ultimately (within a short time, I hope) form part
of the palaeography tutorial on-line at

http://freespace.virgin.net/dave.postles/palindex.html

As I own this document, do feel free as far as my rights are concerned,
to use the images as you will.  I should add that the date is 1679 (as,
of course, will be clearly evident) and that at this date it is still
written in a nice (but well-formed) Secretary Hand (although there is
some rubbing of the MS in places).  Interestingly, it also concerns
Birmingham.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Gray <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 6 Jan 2003 12:19:35 -0500
Subject: 14.024 Shakespeare's Handwriting
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.024 Shakespeare's Handwriting

Take look at handwriting expert Charles Hamilton's In Search of
Shakespeare and his later Cardenio, arguing from striking similarities
between Shakespeare's hand and that of the Second Maiden's Tragedy ms.
that Shakespeare must have written the latter and that it must be
Shakespeare's lost Cardenio!  If one or several uncanny resemblances
could make a convincing ascription, Cardenio might no longer be lost.
But, in this case as in most, they can't.  The Second Maiden's Tragedy
got 27 rejections in 51 tests, sharing with two other plays our highest
rejection total for texts generally thought not to be Shakespeare's.  No
core Shakespeare play got more than three rejections.  The conclusion
does not have to be right for the analysis to be informative.

Ward Elliott

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Re: Anyone Know Yiddish?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.033  Tuesday, 7 January 2003

[1]     From:   H. R. Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 6 Jan 2003 10:34:55 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?

[2]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 06 Jan 2003 10:56:16 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?

[3]     From:   Joachim Martillo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 6 Jan 2003 11:10:55 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?

[4]     From:   Frances Barasch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 6 Jan 2003 13:00:47 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?

[5]     From:   Bob Rosen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 6 Jan 2003 13:24:07 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?

[6]     From:   Michael A. Morrison <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 6 Jan 2003 19:52:31 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           H. R. Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 6 Jan 2003 10:34:55 EST
Subject: 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?

If this is the version I have heard about, the unknown entrepreneur
listed it as HAMLET, SCHAUSPEIL VON SHAKESPEARE, VERANDERT UNDT
VERBESSERT". ("Hamlet, play be Shakespeare, changed and improved"). This
would be a "kvatch" (garbage or shtick) production, aimed at the masses,
filled with songs and dances, interpolated throughout action much as in
Bollywood cinema. However, there was serious Shakespearean theater done
in Yiddish, and done very well -- Carnovsky played King Lear without
song or dance, hence the famous joke about the taxi driver who saw the
play on second avenue in Yiddish, and being told that it would be going
to Broadway, asked Carnovsky, "Nu, so how do you think this will play
uptown". Shakespeare has much stuff at the heart of Yiddish theater --
family conflict and resolution, ungratefulness of children et cetera.

There is a book which outlines the richness of Yiddish theater at its
height.  As far as learning Yiddish quickly and lazily, this is a
supremely rich and complex language, but not difficult to learn as, for
instance, Russian and Japanese. Main problem for most people is the
letters are in Hebrew. There are immersion courses and stuff on records,
and YIVO in NYC would be a good place to contact. There are several
compendiums of Yiddish expressions, notably Rosten's THE JOYS OF
YIDDISH, but I don't quite think this is what the writer had in mind.

H. R. Greenberg

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 06 Jan 2003 10:56:16 -0500
Subject: 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?

Tere's a major Yiddish book collection at Hampshire College in Amherst ,
MA. Someone there should be of help.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joachim Martillo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 6 Jan 2003 11:10:55 EST
Subject: 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?

You might want to join the Mendele Yiddish email list.

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Review.

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[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frances Barasch <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 6 Jan 2003 13:00:47 EST
Subject: 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?

Rhoda Kachuk and Iska Alter have written articles on Shakespeare in
Yiddish theater, covering end of 19th century (I think) and early
decades of 20th.  Hope this helps.  You'll probably find these on World
Shakespeare Bibliography; or address the authors through listing in SAA
directory.

Frances Barasch

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bob Rosen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 6 Jan 2003 13:24:07 EST
Subject: 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?

>I would love to know if and how Shakespeare's play was modified, but
>don't know and don't want to learn Yiddish.  Does anyone know of a lazy
>way?

Shocken Books might have a title that could be helpful. Or you might
refer to reviews of that production in the English press of that time.
Obviously, whoever adapted the play would have cast Shylock in a
favorable light -- compatible to the expectations of a Jewish audience.
Certainly Maurice Schwartz, who probably played Shylock, would have
acted him that way.

See: http://www.jewishmuseum.org.uk/yiddish/expage5.htm

Bob Rosen

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael A. Morrison <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 6 Jan 2003 19:52:31 EST
Subject: 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.028 Anyone Know Yiddish?

See Joel Berkowitz's splendid book, Shakespeare On The American Yiddish
Stage, published last year by the University of Iowa Press.

From the UIP Web site:

"Berkowitz's close study of Shakespeare adaptations demonstrates the
creative adaptiveness of Jewish playwrights, performers, and audiences
to America. This book of theatre history and cultural history is as
entertaining as the plays it describes."-Ruth Wisse, Martin Peretz
Professor of Yiddish Literature and professor of comparative literature,
Harvard University

"Berkowitz's revealing study lovingly and meticulously recreates a
fascinating moment when Yiddish theatre tried to 'improve' itself by
appropriating Shakespeare and his considerable reputation-and in the
process created a newly enriched kind of Shakespeare, brimming over with
pathos, melodrama, unabashed theatricality, and yiddishkeit."-Harley
Erdman, author of Staging the Jew: The Performance of an American
Ethnicity, 1860-1920

"This work is a contribution to American immigrant cultural history, an
invaluable study of the development of modern secular Jewish culture,
and an impressive addition to the growth and uses of theatre in
establishing modern theatrical practices in non-Western societies."-Seth
L. Wolitz, Gale Chair of Jewish Studies, University of Texas at Austin

The professional Yiddish theatre started in 1876 in Eastern Europe; with
the assassination of Tsar Alexander II in 1881, masses of Eastern
European Jews began moving westward, and New York-Manhattan's Bowery and
Second Avenue-soon became the world's center of Yiddish theatre. At
first the Yiddish repertoire revolved around comedies, operettas, and
melodramas, but by the early 1890s America's Yiddish actors were wild
about Shakespeare. In Shakespeare on the American Yiddish Stage, Joel
Berkowitz knowledgeably and intelligently constructs the history of this
unique theatrical culture.

The Jewish King Lear of 1892 was a sensation. The year 1893 saw the
beginning of a bevy of Yiddish versions of Hamlet; that year also saw
the first Yiddish production of Othello. Romeo and Juliet inspired a
wide variety of treatments. The Merchant of Venice was the first
Shakespeare play published in Yiddish, and Jacob Adler received rave
reviews as Shylock on Broadway in both 1903 and 1905. Berkowitz focuses
on these five plays in his five chapters. His introduction provides an
orientation to the Yiddish theatre district in New York as well as the
larger picture of Shakespearean production and the American theatre
scene, and his conclusion summarizes the significance of Shakespeare's
plays in Yiddish culture.

Michael A. Morrison

_______________________________________________________________
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
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Re: Comparison of Henry V Films

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.031  Monday, 6 January 2003

From:           Judi Crane <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 5 Jan 2003 08:50:20 +1100
Subject: 14.018 Re: Comparison of Henry V Films
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.018 Re: Comparison of Henry V Films

Henry (in both 4 and 5) was played by Robert Hardy; probably better
known now for his appearances as Seigfried Farnon in All Creatures Great
and Small and for playing crusty-fusties in Jane Austen adaptations.
The Princess was none other than the now Dame Judi Dench.  The series
was shown on Australian tv in 1962. Is it anywhere available in
Aus-compatible format?  I think I recall a discussion a while ago about
a possible BBC reissue....over to those who know.

Cheers,
Judi Crane

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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