2003

On-line Faculty for a Course in "Global Shakespeare"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.015  Friday, 3 January 2003

From:           Harry Keyishian <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 2 Jan 2003 14:38:08 -0500
Subject:        On-line Faculty for a Course in "Global Shakespeare"

I am teaching a course in Spring 2003 entitled "Global Shakespeare."
Using the internet extensively, students will research the reception of
Hamlet and A Midsummer Night's Dream in several non-American cultures.
My university encourages the use of "virtual" faculty to advise and
guide students. These may be from abroad, or in the US but knowledgeable
of Shakespeare and production "abroad." Some payment will be offered, to
be negotiated with the appropriate offices here. Anyone interested,
please contact me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The workload should not be
too great: just steer students in the right direction and, if possible,
field some questions.

Harry Keyishian, Fairleigh Dickinson University, Madison NJ USA

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Call for Papers: BSA Postgraduate Strand

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.014  Friday, 3 January 2003

From:           Fiona J Ritchie <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 02 Jan 2003 15:04:48 -0000
Subject:        Call for Papers: BSA Postgraduate Strand

CALL FOR PAPERS: POSTGRADUATE STRAND OF THE BRITISH SHAKESPEARE
ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE
De Montfort University, Leicester: 29th - 31st August, 2003

Keynote speakers include: Michael Bogdanov; Professor Stanley Wells;
Professor Russell Jackson; Professor Catherine Belsey.

As part of the academic strand of the forthcoming British Shakespeare
Association conference we are developing a number of dedicated
postgraduate sessions.  These have been organised in order to provide a
supportive environment in which to foster co-operation and exchange
between postgraduates working on Shakespeare.  The sessions are
primarily aimed at new postgraduates (including Master's students) and
will provide students with an opportunity to present their work in front
of their peers and to receive useful feedback.  The sessions will follow
the format of academic research seminars, with papers pre-circulated to
allow maximum time for discussion during the seminar.  Submissions are
welcomed on all aspects of Shakespeare studies but participants may
particularly wish to address the themes of the academic research
seminars or of the three panel sessions: Shakespeare in the past /
Shakespeare present / Shakespeare in the future.

There will also be a session for postgraduates on practical issues (how
to write conference papers, publication, job hunting, etc) with several
recently completed PhD students from across the UK.  The postgraduate
sessions will take place on the morning of Saturday 30th August, in
order to minimise costs whilst also allowing participants to take part
in a broad range of other activities at the BSA conference.

The postgraduate convenor, Fiona Ritchie (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), will
be delighted to answer any further queries about the postgraduate strand
of the conference.  Abstracts of 150-200 words should be submitted by
email to the above address by 31 March 2003.  The deadline for
completion of papers will be 30 June 2003.

For Conference registration details and further details of all Academic
Seminars, Teaching Workshops and Acting Workshops, see:
http://www.britishshakespeare.ws

Fiona J Ritchie
mailto:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Shakespeare and Marlowe

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.012  Thursday, 2 January 2003

[1]     From:   Douglas Chapman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Jan 2003 10:24:27 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.006 Re: Shakespeare and Marlowe

[2]     From:   Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 02 Jan 2003 10:22:18 +0000
        Subj:   Identity Kit


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas Chapman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 1 Jan 2003 10:24:27 EST
Subject: 14.006 Re: Shakespeare and Marlowe
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.006 Re: Shakespeare and Marlowe

>From Dave Kathman:

>It's the usual antistratfordian claptrap, and the
>reaction of any Shakespeare scholars who watch it will undoubtedly be
>either bemusement (at the idea that anybody could take this stuff
>seriously) or annoyance at the way the Marlovians make stuff up and
>twist the facts.

Please put me down (with a particularly large signature) in the latter
camp.  I cannot be bemused knowing how Frontline's reputation will give
credence to all this malarkey. I will not watch. The trailers on PBS are
enough to raise my ire. Shame, PBS and Frontline. For all the reasons
well-stated in this thread.

Douglas Chapman

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 02 Jan 2003 10:22:18 +0000
Subject:        Identity Kit

To prevent one more patina of conjecture solidifying into superglued
certainty on the edifice of the Shakespeare superstructure,  Mr Russell
Mackenzie Fehr's statement (in his constructed answer to the voices he
imagines to be asking him questions) "...the painting we have of
Marlowe...", requires an immediate and spirited application of some of
the "mustard" from "Shakespeare's motto" notified late last year by a
previous correspondent; unless, of course, by "we" he refers to some
hitherto unknown group  possessing a painting of impeccable provenance
and not the kit found on the rubbish tip at the Other Place.

Yours in post-Yuletide dyspepsia,
Graham Hall.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Mrs. Dalloway/The Hours no POB at all NO SHAKESPEARE

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.013  Thursday, 2 January 2003

From:           H. R. Greenberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 1 Jan 2003 12:07:23 EST
Subject:        Mrs. Dalloway/The Hours no POB at all NO SHAKESPEARE EITHER

[Editor's Note: Please send all responses directly to Dr. Greenberg at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. -Hardy]

In preparation for a review of THE HOURS, I am reading MRS DALLOWAY for
the first time. Remarkable book in so many ways -- but I was
particularly struck by Woolf's use of similes which I can only call
Homeric in aptness and beauty. Also noting the one day in one life
comprises all of life forever narrative trajectory, obvious resonances
with both ULYSSES and FINNEGAN'S WAKE come to mind. Not being anything
approaching a Woolf scholar, can anyone out there tell me about Woolf's
view of Joyce. Did Mrs Dalloway appear before Ulysses -- can't remember
the latter publication date. What did she think about Joyce -- one also
notes her own particular pass at stream of consciousness writing which
for me in many ways reminds me of the last chapter of Anna Karenina
rather than Joyce, in terms of Anna's famous inner meditation as she
goes to her death.

Any help here greatly appreciated.

Best to all and happy new year -- HRGreenberg MD ENDIT

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Questions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.011  Thursday, 2 January 2003

From:           Kezia Vanmeter Sproat <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 1 Jan 2003 16:43:46 EST
Subject: 13.2465 Re: Questions
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2465 Re: Questions

Thomas Larque writes:

>A feminist reading is rather too modern to be likely to have
>occurred to a Renaissance author, who - even if he had
>proto-feminist sympathies - wouldn't have thought in terms
>of women winning over a "patriarchal society" at all.

Does anyone really "know" Renaissance authors and what they would NOT
think of?

Sounding parochial here, to make a point: Until Nancy Pelosi or Hillary
Clinton or both, or Elizabeth Dole, etc. have been elected President of
the USA in five or more consecutive 90% landslides, few readers in my
native land can imagine what Shakespeare's life was like. The head,
undisputed, of the body politic/society in his formative and early
creative years was a woman. We must struggle mightily to begin to get
near his "sympathies."

Earlier we "listened to the play." Can we "listen to the corpus" as
well? Why are the great world-shattering tragedies Jacobean? COULD IT BE
that his very supportive infrastructure was crumbling? Why did he retire
early? Look again at the Princess of France in LLL, and at Henry VIII,
Act V.

Kezia Vanmeter Sproat

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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