2003

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0600  Friday, 28 March 2003

[1]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Mar 2003 22:25:57 -0500
        Subj:   No Holds Bard: Women Using Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Mar 2003 16:36:48 -0500
        Subj:   Bringing Down the House--Shakespeare Dog


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Mar 2003 22:25:57 -0500
Subject:        No Holds Bard: Women Using Shakespeare

March 25, 2003

No Holds Bard: Women Using Shakespeare to Forge New Works
By Leonard Jacobs

In an age when self-developed theatrical projects are great ways for
young performers to make their mark, women are increasingly turning to
Shakespeare for inspiration. From solo plays to plays using music,
dance, and original monologues and dialogues, women are freely
appropriating almost anything relating to the Bard -- his plays, his
sonnets, even his biography -- to forge highly original works that
showcase female sensibilities, perspectives, and talent.

The roots of this trend go back to Shakespeare's time, when actors were
exclusively male -- women only began playing Juliet, Kate, Cleopatra,
and the like after the playwright's death. In modern times, women often
play male roles: Sarah Bernhardt as Hamlet, Ruth Maleczech as Lear, and
last month, Blair Brown as Prospera in Emily Mann's production of "The
Tempest" at the McCarter Theatre Center. For more, go to
http://www.backstage.com/backstage/features/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1848523

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Mar 2003 16:36:48 -0500
Subject:        Bringing Down the House--Shakespeare Dog

Fairly early on in the Steve Martin comedy Bringing Down the House, a
racist heiress played by Joan Plowright owns a bull dog named William
Shakespeare. There is a later slang reference by Martin's character to
African-Americans as "dogs" that gets him thrown into his pool.  The dog
Shakespeare is also mentioned at the end of the film.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.