2003

Shxpr: Txt

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0439  Thursday, 6 March 2003

From:           Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Mar 2003 23:00:04 -0800
Subject:        Shxpr: Txt

The British press is having fun with a story about a schoolgirl who
handed in an assigned essay in instant-messaging shorthand.  Txt looks
like this: "My smmr hols wr CWOT. B4, we used 2go2 NY 2C my bro, his GF
& thr 3 :- kids FTF. ILNY, it's a gr8 plc."  The BBC suggested that
perhaps some classics, including Shakespeare, could be put in txt:

* 2b or not 2b thats ?
* a @(---`---`--- by any otha name wd sml swEt
* rm rm w4Ru rm?
* 1nc mr un2 T brech dr frnds 1nc mr

You can read more about this at this at this byproduct of contemporary
civilization at:  http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/2814235.stm

Al Magary

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

CONFERENCE: 400th anniversary of Elizabeth I's death

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0438  Thursday, 6 March 2003

From:           Jean-Christophe MAYER <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tue, 4 Mar 2003 23:34:24 +0100
Subject:        CONFERENCE: 400th anniversary of Elizabeth I's death

[Apologies for cross-posting]

The Institute for Research on the Renaissance, the Neoclassical age and
the Enlightenment (IRCL) is pleased to announce an INTERNATIONAL
CONFERENCE on:

"THE SUCCESSION STRUGGLE IN ENGLAND (1590-1604): ARTISTIC
REPRESENTATIONS AND POLEMICAL WRITINGS"

The conference - which will be held at the University of Montpellier,
France on 27, 28, 29 March 2003 - will correspond to the four-hundredth
anniversary of Elizabeth I's death and of James VI-I's accession to the
throne of England.

Guest speakers include: Philippa Berry (Cambridge), Glenn Burgess
(Hull), Patrick Collinson (Cambridge), Susan Doran (Oxford), Richard
Hillman (Tours), Margaret Jones-Davies (Sorbonne), Franck Lessay
(Sorbonne), Jenny Wormald (Oxford)

Attendance is free.

Please visit the conference website at
<http://jeanchristophe.mayer.free.fr/colloqueLaSuccession.htm> for
further details (abstract of papers, travel and accommodation, etc).

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

THURSDAY 27 MARCH - MORNING

9.30-10 am: Registration (Entrance hall of the Batiment de Recherche
Marc Bloch, University of Montpellier III).

10 - 10.30 am: Official opening of conference (Pierre Jourda Lecture
Hall, Batiment de Recherche Marc Bloch)

Jean-Christophe MAYER (CNRS-Montpellier III, conference organizer).
Michele WEIL (Vice-Chancellor of the university of Montpellier III)
Charles WHITWORTH (Head of the I.R.C.L.)

.       English politics and diplomacy:
Chair: J.-C. Mayer

10.30 - 11 am: Nick Myers (Universite Montpellier III) : "The Gossip of
History : the Question of the Succession in the State Papers (Domestic
and Foreign)".
11 - 11.15 am: discussion

11.15 - 11.45 am: Michele Vignaux (Universite de Versailles-St Quentin)
: "The succession and related issues through the correspondence of
Elizabeth, James, and Robert Cecil".
11.45 - 12 am: discussion

LUNCH on campus (restaurant universitaire "Vert Bois").

THURSDAY 27 MARCH - AFTERNOON
(Pierre Jourda Lecture Hall, Batiment de Recherche Marc Bloch)

.       James VI-I
Chair: Franck Lessay (universite Paris III - Sorbonne Nouvelle)

2 - 3 pm: KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Susan Doran (Christ Church, Oxford, G-B) : "
Three Unpublished Succession Tracts of the 1590s. "
3 - 3. 15 pm: discussion

3.15 - 3.45 pm: Bernard Bourdin (Universite Catholique de Lille) : "
Jacques VI d'Ecosse - Ier d'Angleterre-le droit divin et la doctrine
des deux regnes au service de la succession d'Elisabeth. "
3.45 - 4 pm: discussion

COFFEE

4.30 - 5.30 pm: KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Jenny Wormald (St Hilda's College,
Oxford, G-B) : " The Stuart Accession "
5.30 - 5.45 pm: discussion

8 pm: DINNER at the Brasserie des Arts.

FRIDAY 28 MARCH - MORNING
(Pierre Jourda Lecture Hall, Batiment de Recherche Marc Bloch)

.       Religious history and political identity
Chair: Luc Borot (universite Montpellier III)

9 - 9.30 am: Sandra Jusdado (Universite Montpellier III) : "The
Appellants and the Succession".
9.30 - 9.45 am: discussion.

9.45-10.15 am: Gerard Kilroy (University of Lancaster) : "Sir John
Harington's Protesting Catholic Gifts".
10.15 -10.30 am: discussion.

COFFEE

11 -12 pm: KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Glenn Burgess (University of Hull) :
"Becoming English; Becoming English? The Political Thought of James VI
& I Before and After the English Accession".
12 - 12.15 pm: discussion.

LUNCH on Campus (Restaurant Universitaire "Vert Bois").

FRIDAY 28 MARCH - AFTERNOON
(Pierre Jourda Lecture Hall, Batiment de Recherche Marc Bloch)

.       Religious and cultural history :

Chair: Louis Roux (universite de St. Etienne)

2 - 2.30 pm: Franck Lessay (Universite Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle) :
"Robert Parsons, S.J. et le droit".
2.30 - 2.45 pm:  discussion

2.45 - 3.15 pm: Luc Borot (Universite Montpellier III) : "Father Robert
Parsons's Memorial as utopia: a few thoughts about the question of
succession in general".
3.15 - 3.30 pm: discussion.

COFFEE

4 - 5 pm: KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Patrick Collinson (Trinity College,
Cambridge) : "The Religious Factor".
5 - 5.15 pm: discussion.

8 pm: CONFERENCE DINNER in town: Restaurant "La Diligence" (2 Place
Petrarque, in the old town).

SATURDAY 29 MARCH - MORNING
(Pierre Jourda Lecture Hall, Batiment de Recherche Marc Bloch)

.       Artistic representations :
Chair: Yves Peyre (universite Montpellier III)

9 - 9.30 am: Charles Whitworth, (Universite Montpellier III) : "The
Wounds of Civil War -Thomas Lodge and the Succession".
9.30 - 9.45 am: discussion.

9.45 - 10.15 am: Catherine Lisak (Universite de Bordeaux III) :
"'Succession' versus 'Usurpation': Politics and Rhetoric in
Shakespeare's History Plays".
10.15 -10.30 am: discussion.

COFFEE

11 - 11.30 am: Jean-Christophe Mayer (CNRS/Universite Montpellier III)
: "Late Elizabethan Drama and the Succession".
11.30 -11.45 am: discussion.

11.45-12.15 pm : Margaret Jones-Davies (Universite Paris IV / CNRS) :
"Beyond political opportunism: John Mair (1467-1550) and Shakespeare's
involvement in the succession debate".
12.15-12.30 pm : discussion.

LUNCH at La Brasserie des Arts.

SATURDAY 29 MARCH - AFTERNOON
(Pierre Jourda Lecture Hall, Batiment de Recherche Marc Bloch)

.       Artistic representations (continued) :
Chair: Jean-Marie Maguin (universite Montpellier III)

2.15 - 3.15 pm: KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Philippa Berry (King's College,
Cambridge) : "Vacating the Centre of Power: Cynthia's Revels, the
property of state and the Accession crisis".
3.15 - 3.30 pm:  discussion.

3.30 - 4 pm: Richard Hillman (Universite Francois Rabelais-Tours) :
"Prince Henry's Godfather and the Succession".
4 - 4.15 pm: discussion.

4.15 - 4.45 pm: Christine Sukic (Universite de Dijon): "The Earl of
Essex, from one reign to another".
4.45 - 5 pm: discussion.

END OF CONFERENCE

Jean-Christophe MAYER
Conference Organiser
Institut de recherches sur la Renaissance, l'age Classique,
et les Lumieres ( I.R.C.L.) unite mixte du CNRS
Universite Montpellier III
Route de Mende
34199 Montpellier cedex 5
France
Phone:+ 33 4 67 14 24 48
Fax: + 33 4 67 14 24 65

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Stoney Grounds

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0436  Thursday, 6 March 2003

From:           Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 04 Mar 2003 20:39:45 +0000
Subject:        Stoney Grounds

From: Elliott H. Stone (Sunday, 23 Feb 2003  Re: Endings of Titus)

[...]The first question that arises in my mind. Were Heminge and Condell
really the editors of the First Folio? Their letter in the F1 states
that they were.[...]

No it doesn't.

Yours,
Graham Hall

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies: HISTORY,

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0437  Thursday, 6 March 2003

From:           Bryan Reynolds <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Mar 2003 14:10:15 -0800
Subject:        Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies: HISTORY, AUTHORITY,
PERFORMANCE

Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies: HISTORY, AUTHORITY, PERFORMANCE

The 11th Annual Conference for the Group for Early Modern Cultural
Studies (GEMCS)

Hosted by the UC Irvine Drama Department at the Newport Beach Marriott
Hotel and Resort

NEWPORT BEACH, CALIFORNIA, OCTOBER 23-26, 2003

Held at the beautiful Newport Beach Marriott Hotel and Resort
(overlooking the Pacific Ocean and next to "Fashion Island," Orange
County's nexus for shopping, fine dining, and barhopping), this year's
GEMCS conference will be lavish as well as stimulating. With an
extraordinary conference discount for rooms, $99 for singles and
doubles, the wonders of Southern California are rarely more affordable.

The conference topic, broadly conceived, is designed to include all work
(by graduate students, professors, and independent scholars) about human
life between, roughly, 1500 and 1800, and in any way related to history,
authority, and/or performance. In other words, we invite presentations
of scholarship dealing with the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries and about
and/or practicing materialism, historiography, literary-cultural-social
history and criticism, sexual-gender issues, hermeneutics, authorship,
aesthetics, representation, theatre, and/or sociocultural action, power,
discourse, politics, ideology, and so on.

GEMCS's annual conference, averaging 400 participants, provides a lively
forum for innovative, experimental, and alternative inquiries into all
aspects of pre-modern and early modern culture and society. We solicit
abstracts for papers, panels, discussion groups or workshops that engage
either specific or a variety of disciplines, approaches, and formats. We
encourage atypical formats such as workshops and discussion groups. To
promote intense discussion, it has been a tradition of GEMCS that
presentations be limited to 10 minutes. We ask that you try to maintain
this tradition.

Abstracts (maximum 250 words) for individual papers,
workshops/discussions (any number of participants over eight), and paper
sessions (between three and six participants), must be submitted by:
MAY 1, 2003.

Please send abstracts and inquiries to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Organized by Bryan Reynolds, Head of Doctoral Studies in the Department
of Drama at UC Irvine, this event is sponsored by the Joint UCI/UCSD
Ph.D.  Program in Drama and Theatre.

Additional support for the conference comes from UC Irvine's departments
of English and Comparative Literature, History, and German Studies.

For updated information about the conference, see the conference
website: http://drama.arts.uci.edu/GEMCS2003

For information about GEMCS's scholarly journal, Journal for Early
Modern Cultural Studies, see: http://english.fsu.edu/gemcs/

CFP: Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies (5/1/03; 10/23/03-10/26/03)

Bryan Reynolds
Head of Doctoral Studies
Department of Drama
University of California
Irvine, CA 92697-2775


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare at Stratford

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0435  Thursday, 6 March 2003

From:           Charles Weinstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 2 Mar 2003 14:22:42 -0800
Subject:        Shakespeare at Stratford

The Shakespeare at Stratford series, published by Arden, provides
detailed performance studies of individual plays during the period from
1945 to the present.   Four entries have appeared to date:  Richard III,
The Winter's Tale, Romeo and Juliet and The Merchant of Venice.

Collectively and individually, these volumes suffer from two glaring
methodological flaws which severely qualify their usefulness and
interest: (1) They study only Stratford stagings of a given play,
ignoring other modern English productions of equal or greater
significance.  (2)  They study every Stratford staging of a given play,
affording equal time to the memorable and the properly obscure.

1)  The most influential (many would say the best) modern productions of
the four plays listed above had nothing to do with Stratford-Upon-Avon.
Olivier's Richard III (1944-49) was staged by The Old Vic Company at
London's New Theatre; the Brook-Gielgud Winter's Tale (1951) was mounted
by Tennent Productions in the West End; Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet
(1960) was an Old Vic production; and the Miller-Olivier Merchant (1970)
was produced by The National Theatre at the Old Vic.  The Shakespeare at
Stratford authors gaze yearningly towards these landmark productions,
but because of their Stratford-only mandate they are unable to discuss
them in detail.  Consequently, these volumes do not begin to be adequate
studies of the plays in performance during the postwar English period.
And if they aren't that, one wonders why they were written at all, other
than as the result of some commercial undertaking between the Arden and
Stratford interests.  The editors of this series may have felt that an
exclusive Stratford focus was intellectually justifiable:  it is not.

(2)  During a sixty-year period a theatre, with luck, will do some
interesting and important work.  It will also produce a certain amount
of rubbish:  derivative, uninspired, modish, time-serving or frankly
horrendous stuff that is quickly forgotten after closing night.  The
only sensible (and decent) thing to do with such productions is to let
them rest in condign oblivion.  But no:  the Shakespeare at Stratford
authors exhume them, apply artificial respiration, administer
electroconvulsive therapy, and massage their dusty, silent hearts, all
in a quixotic effort to raise the misbegotten and the insignificant.
Promptbooks are pored over, production records examined, newspaper
clippings scrutinized and lengthy analyses developed; and all this
scholarly industry is lavished without distinction on the bad and the
indifferent as well as the good.  The feeling of pointlessness which
this engenders in a sentient reader can be very strong.  Why won't the
authors acknowledge that some productions have no claim on the interest
of posterity?  Why do they publish work that only Stratford archivists
and people devoid of standards will find consistently absorbing?
(Co-option may have something to do with it: these authors received
their commissions from Arden-Stratford after all).  One may be
fascinated with a Shakespeare play and its performance history, and
still be bored witless by the lack of discrimination, the dutiful
facelessness with which the Shakespeare at Stratford authors fulfill
their appointed tasks.  "The study of mediocrity breeds mediocrity" in
more ways
than one.

Herewith a concrete example, which will efficiently sum up both of my
objections.  I suffered through David Leveaux's (1992) and Adrian
Noble's (1995) stagings of Romeo and Juliet.  Neither created ripples in
its own day, and neither is much talked about in ours.  They will not be
remembered as important or even good productions; one doubts that they
will be remembered at all.  An intelligent and well-proportioned stage
history would give them no more than a paragraph apiece, probably less.
Why, then, do we have a series which studies both of these mediocre
stagings in detail while ignoring a truly influential production like
Zeffirelli's?  Why force the premature canonization of two very recent
productions, neither of which is a plausible candidate for permanence?
There are answers to these questions, some suggested above or in my
earlier posts, but none that makes aesthetic or intellectual sense.

--Charles Weinstein

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.




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