2003

Re: No Holds Bard: Women Using Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0600  Friday, 28 March 2003

[1]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Mar 2003 22:25:57 -0500
        Subj:   No Holds Bard: Women Using Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Mar 2003 16:36:48 -0500
        Subj:   Bringing Down the House--Shakespeare Dog


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Mar 2003 22:25:57 -0500
Subject:        No Holds Bard: Women Using Shakespeare

March 25, 2003

No Holds Bard: Women Using Shakespeare to Forge New Works
By Leonard Jacobs

In an age when self-developed theatrical projects are great ways for
young performers to make their mark, women are increasingly turning to
Shakespeare for inspiration. From solo plays to plays using music,
dance, and original monologues and dialogues, women are freely
appropriating almost anything relating to the Bard -- his plays, his
sonnets, even his biography -- to forge highly original works that
showcase female sensibilities, perspectives, and talent.

The roots of this trend go back to Shakespeare's time, when actors were
exclusively male -- women only began playing Juliet, Kate, Cleopatra,
and the like after the playwright's death. In modern times, women often
play male roles: Sarah Bernhardt as Hamlet, Ruth Maleczech as Lear, and
last month, Blair Brown as Prospera in Emily Mann's production of "The
Tempest" at the McCarter Theatre Center. For more, go to
http://www.backstage.com/backstage/features/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1848523

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Mar 2003 16:36:48 -0500
Subject:        Bringing Down the House--Shakespeare Dog

Fairly early on in the Steve Martin comedy Bringing Down the House, a
racist heiress played by Joan Plowright owns a bull dog named William
Shakespeare. There is a later slang reference by Martin's character to
African-Americans as "dogs" that gets him thrown into his pool.  The dog
Shakespeare is also mentioned at the end of the film.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

The Public Theater's AS YOU LIKE IT

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0599  Thursday, 27 March 2003

From:           Sandi Carroll <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Mar 2003 16:08:42 -0500
Subject:        The Public Theater's AS YOU LIKE IT

I thought you might have a suggestion or two on Shakespeare groups in
the New York City metro area that would be interested in group discount
tickets to our production of As You Like It.  I've included here more
information about the production and our discount rates, and any
thoughts you have would be greatly welcomed.

Sandi Carroll
Marketing & Audience Development
The Public Theater
t: 212.539.8682
f: 212.539.8735

AS YOU LIKE IT
Six actors playing fourteen roles.  Fun, fast-paced, and fresh from the
FringeNYC.

Dear Group Leader,

The Public Theater presents AS YOU LIKE IT written by William
Shakespeare, directed by Erica Schmidt. Using only their own
inexhaustible imaginations and the infinite imagery of Shakespeare's
language, six actors take on all fourteen roles. First presented in a
parking lot on the Lower East Side, this fast-paced physical
tour-de-force captures the raw energy and beautiful simplicity of one of
Shakespeare's most clever comedies.

The Public Theater is pleased to welcome back the talented young
director, Erica Schmidt, whose work first appeared here as part of our
NEW WORK NOW! Festival. Her directing credits include DEBBIE DOES DALLAS
(Off-Broadway at the Jane Street); SPANISH GIRL (Second Stage Uptown);
ROMEO AND JULIET (Outdoor Garage); THE WHITE DEVIL, and DON'T BLINK (The
Directors Company). Schmidt was also the recipient of The Princess Grace
Directing Fellowship Award, 2001. She is currently directing a workshop
of THE KING STAG at the Theatre for a New Audience, as well as SLAG HEAP
at The Cherry Lane Alternative.

AS YOU LIKE IT begins March 25th, with performances Tuesday through
Saturday at 8 pm, Saturday and Sunday at 2 pm and a special matinee on
Wednesdays at noon which is great for school groups. Groups of fifteen
or more not only benefit from discount tickets, but also have access to
post-performance discussions (when available). Group rate ticket prices
are $25 each for fifteen or more, and $20 each for student groups. To
reserve your tickets, please contact the Marketing and Audience
Development Department at (212) 539-8682. Call now to book your tickets
as this offer is subject to availability.

BEYOND THE STAGE After selected shows, join us for an opportunity to
meet the cast, talk with the director, or hear from the playwright, and
be part of a post-show discussion. This is your chance to experience
what goes on beyond the stage. Each discussion will be hosted by a guest
moderator immediately following the performances.

BEYOND THE STAGE scheduled for AS YOU LIKE IT. March 27 (8 pm), April 16
(12 pm), April 24 (8 pm).

OTHER HAPPENINGS AT THE PUBLIC:

NEW WORK NOW!
This Spring we will be holding our tenth annual NEW WORK NOW! play and
musical reading festival. Admission to NEW WORK NOW! is free. Over the
last ten years we have celebrated and developed works by over 100
artists including Suzan-Lori Parks, Tony Kushner and Nilo Cruz. This
year's two-week festival will showcase the most outstanding new plays of
the year, with one week devoted exclusively to the work of Latino
playwrights. Become part of The Public Theater's creative process and
join us in discovering the theater of tomorrow.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Willobie His Avisa

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0597  Thursday, 27 March 2003

From:           Roger Nyle Parisious <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 24 Mar 2003 16:26:16 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 13.2346 Willobie His Avisa
Comment:        Re: SHK 13.2346 Willobie His Avisa

>> From:           Laurie Warner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
>> Date:           Monday, 25 Nov 2002 19:19:18 -0800
>> Subject:        Willobie His Avisa
>>
>> Has any information emerged in recent years
>relating
>> to Henry
>> Willoughby, the alleged author of "Willobie his
>> Avisa", either being a
>> real person or, if not a real person, as to whom
>> could have written the
>> book?

I have had this on my machine for many months hoping that someone could
supply something a bit more comprehensive than my own efforts. As no one
has as yet replied, perhaps my summary of some very old news may, with
luck, stir my hypothetical informants to act

The last Stratfordian treatment appears to be B.N.

DeLuna,"The Queen Declined:An Interpretation of  'Willobie His
Avisa'"(Oxford,l970).Prior to this publication it had been generally
accepted that the initials  "W.S"  for the "old actor" were an
inevitable hit at William  Shakespeare. H.W. would then with equal
inevitability be Henry Southampton (not an obscure Oxford college boy
who was only, perhaps, drug in for the embarrassment which the use of
his initials would occasion to the actual targets). This rather
self-evident interpretation is supported by the fact that this
publication contains both the first allusion to
Shakespeare's "Lucrece"("and Shake-speare paints poor Lucrece rape") and
the first use of the hyphenated form.

Under these circumstances, if the author were Henry Willobie, he must
have been aware that his use of the ,at least, ambiguous double initials
"H.W." and "W.S." could cause him  (and Will) no end of possible social,
not to mention political, difficulties.

Officially the work was being edited for publication by "Willobie's"
room mate "Hadrian Dorrell" who "found" it while his friend was on
Continental tour.Hadrian hopes that his buddy won't mind that he has
rushed off with the purloined manuscript to an undercover publisher,so
struck is HD with the literary genius exhibited by the work.Needless to
say no evidence of the existence of an Oxford student named Hadrian
Dorrell has ever surfaced.To make things even more obvious,an
pseudonymous sequel published two years later,"Penelope"s
Complaint",announces that Henry is dead(he actually had an approximate
twenty years of life ahead of him) but, don't break down folks, his
brother Thomas Willobie will be taking his place as commentator on the
still accelerating scandal.All this smacks of blatant and malicious
fraud  over every nook and cranny ;and the Will Shakspere we all (except
the most rigid neo-Oxfordians) agree was the old actor seems to have
been a prime target for the satire,whatever its now obscure overall
intention may have been.

Miss DeLuna(whom I dubbed a neo-Stratfordian in my articles in the
Elizabethan Review,l998) changed all this with her claim that Willobie's
Avisa was really Elizabeth Tudor(not an Oxford bar maid whom H.W. and
W.S. had on the make).She ,however,amiably conceded that W.S. might well
be our Will but ,in any event, his friend "H.W." was really a split
personality concealing both Robert Dudley and his stepson Robert,Earl of
Essex.T his thesis received a number of sympathetic--and/or straight
faced--reviews.

God help Charlton Ogburn Jr. if he had pulled a stunt like that!
Actually he did pull a stunt like that and incorporated Miss DeLuna
thesis into his magnum opus, but he at least was conservative enough not
to view H.W. as a Doppelganger.

So, at least from the vantage point of a remote Appalachian village, the
subject rested until recently. I found a mere six  contemporary internet
references to Miss DeLuna's once rather widely discussed work, and
nothing more recent on the subject, including Ogburn's somewhat confused
contribution.

Actually, though it has been scarcely noticed, David Kathman in response
to a sequence of insistent questionings by Diana Price and Pat Dooley
back in 2001 announced (July 29th,to be exact) on HLAS that he had
enough historical parallels to satisfy him that Henry Willobie was the
author of "Avisa" and that, while he had no evidence of the existence of
Hadrian Dorrell, he had found that Henry had a good friend of the same
surname, one Thomas. The question of whether Thomas D. was an Oxford
student or not  was left hanging besides the pennant," Semper Eadem" on
Avisa's tavern.

David was coming back to that the next day. It has been nearly two years
now. Please enlighten us, David. This is an absolutely key issue in
Shaksperian biography, one which serious biographers (except for, after
a fashion, DeLuna and Ogburn) have virtually ignored since the early
l940's.

In anticipation of your reply, I will ask a couple of questions. Have
you discovered any evidence of the existence of Henry's smarter older
brother Thomas?(I do not recollect that Hotson found any traces of him
in "By Me William Shakespeare")And ,if so, do you believe Thomas went
along with the hoax about his brother's death, and really is the author
of the TW material in "Penelope's Complaint"?

If the answer is no, would not the parallel use of a non-existent
Hadrian(with a real last name) be just another example of how far the
pseudonymous satirist was willing to go in his efforts to harass Will
and his friends?

Roger Nyle Parisious


_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Questions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0598  Thursday, 27 March 2003

From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Mar 2003 15:43:18 -0400
Subject: 14.0574 Re: Questions
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0574 Re: Questions

In answer to James Conlan, I wasn't particularly disputing Shakespeare's
access to systems of precedence, only the transparency of the example,
which, I think, is open to a number of possible interpretations.

More importantly, I should think, Shakespeare's awareness that
precedence matters in certain situations doesn't necessarily imply that
he's referring to it everywhere.  I'm aware of the layout of an essay,
for instance, but I don't use it to structure my e-mails.  For that
matter, aren't characters listed in order in part simply because it's
impossible to list them all at once?  Is Rosencrantz more highly
honoured than Guildenstern?  Is Gertrude snubbing one by mentioning the
other first?

Yours,
Sean.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Critical Encounters of the Negative Kind

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0596  Thursday, 27 March 2003

From:           Charles Weinstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 24 Mar 2003 15:49:01 -0800
Subject:        Critical Encounters of the Negative Kind

"But what of 'destructive' criticism, which is far and wide alleged to
be bad?  The terms 'constructive' and 'destructive,' as applied to
criticism, have no meaning whatever.  There is only good and bad
criticism.  What indeed might 'constructive' mean in reference to a
critique?  From the author in question, 'Like me, don't knock me!' which
is an absurd request.  From the pedagogue, 'Show him or her where and
how the thing could be improved!'  But any genuine artist would resent
the critic's offering to remake his work; only school compositions can
so be treated by teachers, and it may be that even they should not.  I
cannot write someone else's book, play or scenario for him; I can only
point out where and why he lost me--and that, I suppose, would already
be considered 'destructive' criticism.  To the casual layman,
'constructive' criticism would be, 'Go easy on him, he is doing his
best.'  But this is the worst fallacy of all: it assumes that art does
not really matter.  If a surgeon's patients die on him, one after the
other, does one excuse him by saying he did his best?  Can a
statesman's, a military commander's, an educator's errors be excused so
cheaply?  No; because those things matter.  Whereas art, it would seem,
does not.

But to the critic to whom art is important, sacred, and, ultimately,
coextensive with life itself, to produce bad art and to condone it--and
thereby give rise to further bad art and finally drive out the good--are
the two most heinously dangerous sins imaginable.  And the most
destructive."

--John Simon, "A Critical Credo" (1967).

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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