2003

Re: Public Executions: Hang, Drawn, and Quartered

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0560  Thursday, 20 March 2003

From:           James Doyle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 20 Mar 2003 12:19:43 -0000
Subject:        Re: Public Executions: Hang, Drawn, and Quartered

The pulling apart of a body by horses was not part of this process.
Here's the wording of sentencing to hanging, drawing and quartering,
from http://www.baronage.co.uk/bphtm-01/wallace3.html

"You are to be drawn on a hurdle to the place of execution, where you
are to be hanged, but not till you are dead; for while still living,
your body is to be taken down, your bowels torn out and burnt before
your face; your head is then cut off, and your body divided into four
quarters."

In earlier times the explicit words "your privy parts cut away and burnt
before your eyes" were spoken...

So, correctly speaking, drawing, hanging and quartering would be a
better name.  The drawing was to humiliate the victim.  The emasculation
and evisceration were symbolic parts of the punishment, and the
quartering was to allow the evidence to be used to advertise to other
potential traitors in multiple locations.

Regards,
james doyle

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Warburon's Manuscripts

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0559  Thursday, 20 March 2003

From:           Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 20 Mar 2003 08:34:57 +0000
Subject:        Warburon's Manuscripts

From: "[...]Russell MacKenzie Fehr Tuesday, 18 Mar 2003

>Warburton's Manuscripts
>
>As I recall reading, only 3 and a fraction of Sir William Warburton's
>manuscript collection still exists today. Does anyone know what plays these
>were, and where can I find a full list of the plays he claimed to
>have[...]"

Lancashire, Anne, "Warburton's List [...] Relationship", Studies in
Bibliography, Vol 27 (1974) would assist. Access SB from Electronic Text
Centre, U of Virginia if you do not have it locally.

Best wishes,
Graham Hall

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Questions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0557  Thursday, 20 March 2003

From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 19 Mar 2003 14:52:46 -0400
Subject: 14.0543 Re: Questions
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0543 Re: Questions

James Conlan writes,

>Further, it is a notorious fact that the Innocents' Day, 1594,
>performance of _Errors_ at Gray's Inn was delayed as the audience on the
>stage was arranged according to their proper station.  Moved from a
>place of greater precedence to a lesser, the Ambassador to the court
>from the Middle Temple left.

The account in Gesta Grayorum is as follows:

When the Ambassador was placed, as aforesaid, and that there was
something to be performed for the Delight of the Beholders, there arose
such a disordered Tumult and Crowd upon the Stage, that there was no
Opportunity to effect that which was intended:  There came so great a
number of worshipful Personages upon the Stage, that might not be
displaced; and Gentlewomen, whose Sex did privilege them from Violence,
that when the Prince and his Officers had in vain, a good while,
expected and endeavoured a Reformation, at length there was no hope of
Redress for that present.  The Lord Ambassador and his Train thought
that they were not so kindly entertained, as was before expected, and
thereupon would not stay any longer at that time, but, in a sort,
discontented and displeased.  After their Departure the Throngs and
Tumults did somewhat cease, although so much of them continued, as was
able to disorder and confound any good Inventions whatsoever.  In regard
whereof, as also for that the Sports intended were especially for the
gracing of the Templarians, it was thought good not to offer any thing
of Account, saving Dancing and Revelling with Gentlewomen; and after
such Sports, a Comedy of Errors (like to Plautus his Menechmus) was
played by the Players.

There is no direct mention of the ambassador being moved to a position
of lesser precedence, only to being badly entertained, which isn't even
directly linked with the "tumult and disorder"; moreover, the account
suggests that the production of Error was not delayed, but rather, that
the production of something else "to be performed for the Delight of the
Beholders" was replaced by it.  In fact, the persons who came unto the
stage are described as "worshipful" which would militate against any
sort of violation of rank.

Unless there's another account of the evening, I don't think that this
is any clearer an indication of precedence than the reversal of names
(if that it is) at the end of Romeo and Juliet.

Yours,
Sean Lawrence.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Actors' Accents

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0558  Thursday, 20 March 2003

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 19 Mar 2003 14:57:04 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0534 Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents

[2]     From:   Anna Kamaralli <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 20 Mar 2003 11:09:03 +1100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0534  Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents

[3]     From:   Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 19 Mar 2003 12:21:47 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0534 Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 19 Mar 2003 14:57:04 -0400
Subject: 14.0534 Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0534 Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents

Michael Shugot writes that

>But as one who has spent many years reviewing Shakespeare productions in
>several
>American cities (admittedly all on the west coast), I believe that
>American companies can produce WS's plays in what are often called
>"regional theatres" (so-called in the pages of Shakespeare Bulletin)
>that can command the attention of serious theatre patrons.

Of course I would agree, and I've seen a number of fairly effective
productions in several different accents and before different
audiences.  My original argument was just against the assumption that
"relevancy" is the only route to engagement.  As my reference to foreign
film might suggest, things that seem foreign and even irrelevant can
elicit a great deal of interest, albeit not from all audiences.

Yours with interest,
Sean Lawrence.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anna Kamaralli <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 20 Mar 2003 11:09:03 +1100
Subject: 14.0534  Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0534  Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents

>A King does not talk like a ploughmen - or vise versa.

Any thoughts on how Perdita should talk, then? Has she ever been played
with a Somerset accent? I'd pay money to hear that.

Anna Kamaralli.

P.S. I have a friend who does the most marvellous Cleopatra using the
sonorous tones of suburban Bolton. Virtuoso stuff.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 19 Mar 2003 12:21:47 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 14.0534 Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0534 Re: Shaw on Actors' Accents

Sam Small writes,

> Little has changed since Shakespeare's time.

Really? Different nations, changing accents, lots has changed. I'm
confused. Are people really suggesting that Northern Broadsides should
not use their regional accent? That productions in America starring
Americans should not use their own accent? This sounds like cultural
tyranny. Plus, there is the fact that even the kings in the history
plays or the tragedies did not use a national accent as we know it.
Henry IV and V were of Welsh descent. The latter play, perhaps more than
any other is concerned with national and regional identities. Should
Macbeth always be performed with a Scottish accent, although it rarely
is?

What I think is being said here is that, when an accent is not
specifically demanded, the actors should use the accent most natural to
themselves and their auditors. Lots has changed. There is more than one
way to do Shakespeare. The choices are infinite.

Brian Willis

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Academic Publishing (Was Standard Work)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0556  Thursday, 20 March 2003

[1]     From:   David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 19 Mar 2003 12:29:22 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0527 Re: Standard Work On Early English Book
Publishing

[2]     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 19 Mar 2003 12:36:45 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 14.0536 Re: Standard Work On Early English Book Publishing

[3]     From:   James Conlan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 19 Mar 2003 18:49:50 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0536 Re: Standard Work On Early English Book
Publishing


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 19 Mar 2003 12:29:22 -0500
Subject: 14.0527 Re: Standard Work On Early English Book
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0527 Re: Standard Work On Early English Book
Publishing

>Professor Magary asks a pertinent and frightening question: What is
>happening to academic publishing? In looking for a publisher of a book
>of interviews of American Shakespearean actors, I have discovered that
>Univ. of California Press no longer publishes scholarly books on drama
>or literary topics. I guess such books don't sell well enough to be
>worthwhile for that erstwhile prestigious academic press. The UCP's web
>site no longer lists such topics, not is there a contact person listed
>for them.  Such developments bode ill, I fear, for our and related
>professions.
>
>Regards,
>Michael Shurgot

I share Michael Shurgot's concern, and was a little surprised not to see
a session at the SAA devoted to the issue.  (I stopped going to MLA
years ago--was it taken up there?)  I'm no longer in the thick of the
fight for tenure and merit raises, but if I were an assistant professor
in our field at a school that expected at least one book as a criterion
for promotion and tenure I would be scared silly.

David Evett

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 19 Mar 2003 12:36:45 -0500
Subject: Re: Standard Work On Early English Book Publishing
Comment:        SHK 14.0536 Re: Standard Work On Early English Book Publishing

Al Magary suggests that

'Maybe "Perfesser" would fit...'

Really? In fact, the title originates in New Orleans where it referred
to the man who played the piano in a 'sporting-house'. How about 'I did
it my way'? B flat OK?

T. Hawkes

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Conlan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 19 Mar 2003 18:49:50 +0000
Subject: 14.0536 Re: Standard Work On Early English Book
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0536 Re: Standard Work On Early English Book
Publishing

I appreciate the perspective of Kristine Batey.  However, from the
perspective of US research libraries, the origins of the crisis in
academic publishing in the humanities look somewhat different.
According to the Association of Research Libraries, the price of
scholarly journals has more than tripled since 1986.  This rise in price
has meant increased dollars invested in the health and natural sciences
research fields relative to the humanities because answering lucrative
NIH RFAs allows only 3-4 months of lead time and therefore requires
materials on site. Encouragement by accrediting bodies and faculties to
purchase online access to journal subscriptions already held in print
has put additional pressure on acquisitions budgets -- but without
providing more intellectual capital. As acquisitions funds at research
institutions have not risen in proportion to these increased demands,
the pool of funds available for purchasing scholarly monographs and
specialized reference works in the humanities has shrunk.  Fewer copies
sold by a press means less profit and increased warehousing costs;
increases in price in response (c. 60% since 1986) drain the pool
further.  In recent years, the bad economy, by shrinking endowments and
alumni support for private universities) and placing greater demands on
the state tax base for public universities, have contributed to a
macroeconomic trend already at work that appears to have been initiated
at university presses themselves.  One wonders how profitable this
policy has been.  Certainly Yale houses a number of prestigious academic
journals that it wants to make a profit.  But the disparity between
Yale's $16 million acquisitions budget, the NYPL's $12 million
acquisitions budget, and the $7.35 million average ARL member budget
means that Yale is paying considerably more every year for the material
they have than they might if the pool of purchasers was larger.

Best,
JP Conlan

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.