2003

Unlike Hamlet, Bush Can Escape His Father's Destiny

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0827  Wednesday, 30 April 2003

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Apr 2003 23:23:58 -0400
Subject:        Unlike Hamlet, Bush Can Escape His Father's Destiny

http://www.bayarea.com/mld/mercurynews/news/editorial/5728553.htm

To be or not to be elected
UNLIKE HAMLET, BUSH CAN ESCAPE HIS FATHER'S DESTINY
By Jim Puzzanghera

His famous father and two major features shared by their presidencies --
a decisive military victory over Iraq and a struggling domestic economy
-- have cast George W. Bush as the lead character in an American
political drama worthy of Shakespeare.

Posted on Sunday, Apr. 27, 2003

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: King John, Titus, Peele

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0826  Wednesday, 30 April 2003

[1]     From:   William Proctor Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Apr 2003 11:10:04 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0817 Re: King John, Titus, Peele

[2]     From:   B. Vickers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Apr 2003 11:12:34 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0776 Re: King John, Titus, Peele


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Proctor Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Apr 2003 11:10:04 -0400
Subject: 14.0817 Re: King John, Titus, Peele
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0817 Re: King John, Titus, Peele

Interesting as I am finding this discussion, and I really mean that, I
fear that we are in danger of forgetting what WS says in another play,
if it is indeed him saying it, about his craft, and that of Peele,
Greene, Jonson, and the lot:

                The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling,
                 Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven;
                 And as imagination bodies forth
                 The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen
                 Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing
                 A local habitation and a name.
                 Such tricks hath strong imagination. . . .

This may be where panthers lurk and human sacrifice takes place.

William Proctor Williams

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           B. Vickers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Apr 2003 11:12:34 +0200
Subject: 14.0776 Re: King John, Titus, Peele
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0776 Re: King John, Titus, Peele

Jim Carroll's objections that 'one did not go into one's backyard and
hunt panthers in Rome' shows that he must have a very strange idea of
Elizabethan drama. Dare I mention such things as dramatic conventions
and the audience's imagination?

On the dramaturgy of Act 1, if Mr. Carroll reads on to my ch. 7 he will
find an analysis of Peele's dramaturgy -- based in part on the detailed
studies of Werner Senn, Gregor Sarrazin, MacDonald Jackson, and Al
Braunmuller -- which shows many similarities of structure and function
with Peele.

As to the 20 independent linguistic tests I have documented, I don't
intend to argue the toss with him, since he's made it very clear that he
doesn't intend to be persuaded. Ars longa, vita brevis est.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Critique of the Arden Editions?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0824  Wednesday, 30 April 2003

From:           Tue Sorensen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Apr 2003 02:43:51 +0200
Subject:        Critique of the Arden Editions?

In light of the current string about single-volume editions, I'd like to
ask people if they have any substantial critiques of the Arden editions,
which are my favorites (I also have the single-volume Norton
Shakespeare, but I tend to disagree with the Oxford editors). I think
annotation is indispensable, and the more of it the better (as long as
one knows it's highly qualified).

In fact, if anyone knows of editions with more annotation than Arden (I
know that the New Cambridge editions have nearly as much, but not of the
same quality), I'd love to know about them (I'll look for the Contexts
editions that someone mentioned).

- Tue Sorensen

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: God Save the Queen

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0825  Wednesday, 30 April 2003

From:           David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Apr 2003 22:52:22 -0400
Subject: 14.0816 Re: God Save the Queen
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0816 Re: God Save the Queen

My own favorite (and a strong contender on account of its great age -
two millennia or more, it would seem) I first heard in a cavers' pub
south of Bath.  It's sung to the tune of "Men of Harlech".  T.  Hawkes
probably knows more verses.

Romans came across the channel
All dressed up in tin and flannel
Half a pint of woad per man'll
Serve as well as these.
Woad to fight the foe, men!
Woad is how you'll go men!
Boil it to a brilliant blue and rub it on your neck and your abdomen.
Ancient Briton ne'er did hit on
Anything so good as woad to fit on
Neck or knees or where you sit on  -
Better far is woad.

There is a second verse which I cannot remember, but the second chorus
goes:

Tramp up Snowdon
With your woad on,
Never mind if you get rained or blowed on
Long as you have got your woad on.
Courage, Ancient B.'s.

Brittanically,
David Evett

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: All Region DVD Players

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0823  Wednesday, 30 April 2003

From:           Candace Lines <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Apr 2003 15:16:52 -0400
Subject: 14.0809 Re: All Region DVD Players
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.0809 Re: All Region DVD Players

I'm pretty sure the issue is the DVD player, not the TV itself. I have a
"code-free" DVD player (bought off the internet) which plays British
DVDs perfectly well on my American television.

I'm NOT sure, though, that an ordinary British DVD player (not
code-free) would work with an American television, or vice-versa. I
think that code-free players are modified to eliminate this
incompatibility.

Anyway, a good online DVD seller should explain all the coding and
PALS/NTSC issues, and should provide full information on any player
before you buy.

Candace Lines
Howard University

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.