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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: April ::
Re: God Save the Queen
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0643  Thurssday, 3 April 2003

[1]     From:   Carol Morley <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 02 Apr 2003 12:12:19 +0000
        Subj:   Re: God Save the Queen in British Theaters

[2]     From:   Kevin De Ornellas <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 02 Apr 2003 13:22:14 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen

[3]     From:   Martin Steward <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 14:01:39 +0100
        Subj:   SHK 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen

[4]     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 02 Apr 2003 14:31:17 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol Morley <
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Date:           Wednesday, 02 Apr 2003 12:12:19 +0000
Subject:        Re: God Save the Queen in British Theaters

Being just old enough to remember the practice of playing the National
Anthem in both theatres and cinemas (and the mad dash of adults towing
children to the exit to escape during the first few bars), I was
delighted by Michael Bogdanov's brilliant ironic use of that ghastly
galliard to conclude the final part of the ESC's Wars of the Roses. Who,
after all would want to stand up for Henry Tudor?

Best to All,
Carol Morley

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kevin De Ornellas <
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Date:           Wednesday, 02 Apr 2003 13:22:14 +0000
Subject: 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen

>What should we call that part of the British Isles that isn't Scotland,
>Wales, Ireland or Ulster?

Don, by "Ireland and Ulster", did you mean "The Republic of Ireland and
Northern Ireland"?  Please be very careful about what you understand
"Ulster" to be: that sort of thing really matters here.

Kevin De Ornellas
Queen's University, Belfast

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <
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Date:           Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 14:01:39 +0100
Subject: Re: God Save the Queen
Comment:        SHK 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen

Terence Hawkes rebukes me for calling Parliament "sovereign":

"It is certainly not 'sovereign'. All of its legislation requires the
assent of a higher body -the monarch- before it becomes law. This can
be, and has been, witheld or delayed. At the opening of each parliament,
the monarch publicly outlines the forthcoming legislative programme of
what he or she calls  'my government'."

The Parliament Act of 1949 suggests something very different.

As far back as the 17thC, Sir Edward Coke argued that, if the King was
overseas, his Lieutenant was empowered to call a Parliament, and that
that Parliament should not be subject to automatic dissolution upon the
King's return: Institutes IV, Cap. I, "Of the High and Most Honourable
Court of Parliament", pp.6-7, Institutes II, "Magna Carta, Cap. II",
p.26. In other words, there is no such thing as a King outside of
Parliament, even when the King-in-Parliament is a proxy (Commentators
such as Coke and Blackstone imply that there never was such a thing as a
King outside of Parliament). By far the most important thing to remember
in any discussion of Parliament is that it "consisteth of the Kings
Majesty sitting there as in his Royall politick capacity, and of the
three Estates of the Realm": Institutes IV, Cap.1, p.1

martin

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Wednesday, 02 Apr 2003 14:31:17 -0400
Subject: 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen

Terence Hawkes writes,

>All of its [Parliament's] legislation requires the
>assent of a higher body -the monarch- before it becomes law. This can
>be, and has been, witheld or delayed.

According to "Companion to the Standing Orders and guide to the
Proceedings of the Lords", "The power to refuse Royal Assent was last
exercised in 1708, when Queen Anne refused Her Assent to a bill for
settling the Militia in Scotland."  The web page for this document is
http://www.parliament.the-stationery-office.co.uk/pa/ld/ldcomp/compso29.htm

The principle of responsible government was brought in somewhat later in
Canada, in the Rebellion Losses Bill of 1849, passed despite the
governor-general's personal qualms and the violence of an angry mob
which burned down Parliament.  It hasn't sat in Quebec City since.

More importantly, it strikes me that there must be at least one
commonwealth country that's declared itself to be a republic by act of
parliament.  Such a fundamental constitutional change would seem to be
the function of a sovereign assembly, if only de facto.

Yours,
Sean.

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