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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: April ::
Re: The Real Beale
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0646  Thurssday, 3 April 2003

[1]     From:   Martin Steward <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 14:13:54 +0100
        Subj:   SHK 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale

[2]     From:   Edward Brown <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 10:36:43 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale

[3]     From:   Brian Willis <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 11:16:23 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <
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Date:           Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 14:13:54 +0100
Subject: Re: The Real Beale
Comment:        SHK 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale

"I have had similar accusations when I attacked Julie Taymor, Mozart and
Tolkein.  I felt genuinely incensed by aspects of their work in regard
to Shakespeare..."

If Sam has found Mozart's "Tempest" opera he has a duty to humanity to
let us all know!

Ah! If only! IF ONLY! Now there's "such stuff as dreams are made on".

martin

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edward Brown <
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Date:           Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 10:36:43 EST
Subject: 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale

We have many examples of what a Renaissance prince looks like through
portraits and contemporary written descriptions. Thomas More described
Henry at the time of his accession as tall and muscular, with a
beautiful face and rosy cheeks. His skeleton, measured in 1813, was 6'2"
in length, so we know he was quite tall for his day. His suit of armor
of 1514 had a 35" waist and 42" chest. Only after serious leg injuries
curtailed his athletic activities did he become corpulent.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Willis <
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Date:           Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 11:16:23 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale

>But "Hamlet" is not a documentary, and Prince Hamlet
>is a hero.

But that is part of my point. What does a hero look like? The past few
years in world events alone should prove that heroes come in many forms
and many types.  Even Ophelia's description of the mould of form is
sufficiently vague to keep the question open. Does form refer to his
shape and physical attractiveness?  Or does it refer to how he bears
himself, or to sprezzatura? Nothing specifically refers to his physical
shape in the dynamics we have come to expect (and indeed must make
amenities for) in Falstaff, Henry VIII, and even Andrew Aguecheek. Mould
of form is quite possibly a continuation of glass of fashion.  If
Ophelia referred to his blonde hair or so on, I would see a reason to
expect that. But the problem is that we have expectations in our heads
which are erroneous and therefore cause us to dismiss a performance
purely on appearance alone. And that makes me ashamed.

Brian Willis

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