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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: April ::
Re: Love's Labour's Wonne
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0647  Thurssday, 3 April 2003

[1]     From:   Todd Pettigrew <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 09:33:59 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.0639 Re: Love's Labour's Wonne

[2]     From:   Brian Willis <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 10:52:57 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0639 Re: Love's Labour's Wonne


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Todd Pettigrew <
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Date:           Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 09:33:59 -0400
Subject: 14.0639 Re: Love's Labour's Wonne
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.0639 Re: Love's Labour's Wonne

Bob Grumman writes:

"There is no overt hook to a second play in the alleged first."

Perhaps not, but could a covert hook imply a sequel? To be sure,
Shakespeare's comedies often end not with marriage per se but with the
promise of marriage once the details are cleared up (the assumed
marriage of Orsino and Viola in Twelfth Night is one example) but in LLL
there's that conspicuously long time that the men must wait. That time
lag implies the possibility of temptation or change of feeling and that
implication is strengthened by the highly conditional nature of the
engagements. As the Princess says,

        Your oath I will not trust; but go with speed
        To some forlorn and naked hermitage,
        Remote from all the pleasures of the world;
        There stay until the twelve celestial signs
        Have brought about the annual reckoning.
        If this austere insociable life
        Change not your offer made in heat of blood;
        If frosts and fasts, hard lodging and thin weeds
        Nip not the gaudy blossoms of your love,
        But that it bear this trial and last love;
        Then, at the expiration of the year,
        Come challenge me, challenge me by these deserts,
        And, by this virgin palm now kissing thine
        I will be thine

Could the hook be in the "ifs"?

Todd Pettigrew
University College of Cape Breton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Willis <
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Date:           Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 10:52:57 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 14.0639 Re: Love's Labour's Wonne
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0639 Re: Love's Labour's Wonne

I don't know what to expect from the sequel of a play whose ending
defies all expectations of comedy. If the play with a similar title is
even a sequel at all. Unless we find a smoking gun, we will never know.

Brian Willis

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