Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: April ::
Re: The Strachey Letter
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0775  Thursday, 24 April 2003

[1]     From:   John W. Kennedy <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 23 Apr 2003 12:33:12 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0763 Re: The Strachey Letter

[2]     From:   Bob Grumman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 23 Apr 2003 14:57:24 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0763 Re: The Strachey Letter

[3]     From:   John Zuill <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 23 Apr 2003 23:50:45 -0300
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0763 Re: The Strachey Letter


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John W. Kennedy <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 23 Apr 2003 12:33:12 -0400
Subject: 14.0763 Re: The Strachey Letter
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0763 Re: The Strachey Letter

Ira Zinman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 > writes,

>It seems a creative mind like
>Shakespeare's could have manufactured a shipwreck scenario with or
>without Strachey's story.

As I have remarked before, in "Dating 'The Tempest'"
(http://www.shakespeareauthorship.com/tempest.html), David Joseph
Kathman demonstrates at length that the verbal and narrative parallels
in "The Tempest" with _three_ contemporary accounts of the wreck of the
Sea-Venture are far too much to ignore.

In any case, it is all very well to say that Shakespeare "could have
manufactured" a story, but the evidence is plain that that simply wasn't
his method of working.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bob Grumman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 23 Apr 2003 14:57:24 -0400
Subject: 14.0763 Re: The Strachey Letter
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0763 Re: The Strachey Letter

>The wreck of Sir Thomas Gates ship and the survival in the Bermudas is
>one of many tragedies at sea and rescues at sea.  What have they to do
>with the deposed Prospero being set adrift with his young daughter.  I
>understand the dating of the Tempest has become an incessant issue with
>the authorship debate and who wrote what when.  But the survival of the
>Gates vessel in reality has little to do with the important themes in
>the Tempest don't you think?  It seems a creative mind like
>Shakespeare's could have manufactured a shipwreck scenario with or
>without Strachey's story.
>
>Regards,
>Ira

Sure.  And he could have manufactured a story about an English King who
went to France and won a battle without Holinshed, but he didn't.  Your
complaint is standard for those who like literature but not literary
history.  But literary history is important.

--Bob G.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Zuill <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 23 Apr 2003 23:50:45 -0300
Subject: 14.0763 Re: The Strachey Letter
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0763 Re: The Strachey Letter

>But the survival of the
>Gates vessel in reality has little to do with the important themes in
>the Tempest don't you think?

I've wondered about this too, and again, I'm Bermudian. I can only think
that the political struggle between Gates and Somers may have provided
some ideas for the play. Confrontation is difficult on an island because
it's hard to avoid. There is little room for tactical play sometimes. If
it were a sport it would be wrestling (the real kind) not soccer or
football.  The Somers/ Gates dispute was brotherly in a way, also sort
of classic, Gilgamesh and Enkidu, civilization and nature etc. But those
aren't quite the focus of the play either. It's a hard argument to make
and not a particularly illuminating one I think.

John

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.