2003

Re: Love's Labour's Wonne

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0647  Thurssday, 3 April 2003

[1]     From:   Todd Pettigrew <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 09:33:59 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.0639 Re: Love's Labour's Wonne

[2]     From:   Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 10:52:57 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0639 Re: Love's Labour's Wonne


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Todd Pettigrew <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 09:33:59 -0400
Subject: 14.0639 Re: Love's Labour's Wonne
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.0639 Re: Love's Labour's Wonne

Bob Grumman writes:

"There is no overt hook to a second play in the alleged first."

Perhaps not, but could a covert hook imply a sequel? To be sure,
Shakespeare's comedies often end not with marriage per se but with the
promise of marriage once the details are cleared up (the assumed
marriage of Orsino and Viola in Twelfth Night is one example) but in LLL
there's that conspicuously long time that the men must wait. That time
lag implies the possibility of temptation or change of feeling and that
implication is strengthened by the highly conditional nature of the
engagements. As the Princess says,

        Your oath I will not trust; but go with speed
        To some forlorn and naked hermitage,
        Remote from all the pleasures of the world;
        There stay until the twelve celestial signs
        Have brought about the annual reckoning.
        If this austere insociable life
        Change not your offer made in heat of blood;
        If frosts and fasts, hard lodging and thin weeds
        Nip not the gaudy blossoms of your love,
        But that it bear this trial and last love;
        Then, at the expiration of the year,
        Come challenge me, challenge me by these deserts,
        And, by this virgin palm now kissing thine
        I will be thine

Could the hook be in the "ifs"?

Todd Pettigrew
University College of Cape Breton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 10:52:57 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 14.0639 Re: Love's Labour's Wonne
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0639 Re: Love's Labour's Wonne

I don't know what to expect from the sequel of a play whose ending
defies all expectations of comedy. If the play with a similar title is
even a sequel at all. Unless we find a smoking gun, we will never know.

Brian Willis

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Re: The Real Beale

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0646  Thurssday, 3 April 2003

[1]     From:   Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 14:13:54 +0100
        Subj:   SHK 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale

[2]     From:   Edward Brown <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 10:36:43 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale

[3]     From:   Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 11:16:23 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 14:13:54 +0100
Subject: Re: The Real Beale
Comment:        SHK 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale

"I have had similar accusations when I attacked Julie Taymor, Mozart and
Tolkein.  I felt genuinely incensed by aspects of their work in regard
to Shakespeare..."

If Sam has found Mozart's "Tempest" opera he has a duty to humanity to
let us all know!

Ah! If only! IF ONLY! Now there's "such stuff as dreams are made on".

martin

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edward Brown <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 10:36:43 EST
Subject: 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale

We have many examples of what a Renaissance prince looks like through
portraits and contemporary written descriptions. Thomas More described
Henry at the time of his accession as tall and muscular, with a
beautiful face and rosy cheeks. His skeleton, measured in 1813, was 6'2"
in length, so we know he was quite tall for his day. His suit of armor
of 1514 had a 35" waist and 42" chest. Only after serious leg injuries
curtailed his athletic activities did he become corpulent.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 11:16:23 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0636 Re: The Real Beale

>But "Hamlet" is not a documentary, and Prince Hamlet
>is a hero.

But that is part of my point. What does a hero look like? The past few
years in world events alone should prove that heroes come in many forms
and many types.  Even Ophelia's description of the mould of form is
sufficiently vague to keep the question open. Does form refer to his
shape and physical attractiveness?  Or does it refer to how he bears
himself, or to sprezzatura? Nothing specifically refers to his physical
shape in the dynamics we have come to expect (and indeed must make
amenities for) in Falstaff, Henry VIII, and even Andrew Aguecheek. Mould
of form is quite possibly a continuation of glass of fashion.  If
Ophelia referred to his blonde hair or so on, I would see a reason to
expect that. But the problem is that we have expectations in our heads
which are erroneous and therefore cause us to dismiss a performance
purely on appearance alone. And that makes me ashamed.

Brian Willis

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
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Call for Papers: Mid-Atlantic Popular/American

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0644  Thurssday, 3 April 2003

From:           Annalisa Castaldo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 08:05:28 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Call for Papers: Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture
Conference

Apologies for cross-posting

Shakespeare in Popular Culture
an Area of Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Association
Wilmington, DE
November 7-9, 2003

Panels and single papers are sought for "Shakespeare in Popular Culture"
at the annual Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Association
Conference. We are interested in documenting and examining the Bard's
place in contemporary popular culture, particularly American Culture.
Possible areas of interest include:

.Shakespearean references/adaptations in any media form, including
novels, plays, music, comics, television, film, and advertising.
.Uses of Shakespeare as a character
.Shakespeare as "celebrity"
.Examinations of popular Shakespeare in the classroom.
.Cultural work using Shakespeare at both a high and popular cultural
level

Send abstracts (100-250 words) or panels by June 15 to:
Annalisa Castaldo This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Please include: title, academic affiliation, email and snail mail.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

"Nightfall" by Authur C. Clarke

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0645  Thurssday, 3 April 2003

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, April 03, 2003
Subject:        "Nightfall" by Authur C. Clarke

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

I would first like to report that the SHAKSPER Spinoff team, under the
leadership of Douglas Lanier, has been actively planning the development
of the Spinoffs Database. More to follow.

There currently are two Pop Shakespeare Files on the file sever: the
Spinoffs File and the Character Bibliography. The later is a
bibliography of works in which Shakespeare is a character --
http://www.shaksper.net/archives/files/charactr.biblio.html

I would like to suggest an addition to this list.

As a fan of audiobooks, I am currently listening to <I>The Collected
Stories of Arthur C. Clarke</I>. The second story, "Nightfall"
(<I>King's College Review</I> 1947; reprinted as "The Curse" in <I>Reach
for Tomorrow</I>), evokes a post-apocalyptic vision of Stratford in
general and Shakespeare's grave in particular after a nuclear holocaust.

Hardy

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: God Save the Queen

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0643  Thurssday, 3 April 2003

[1]     From:   Carol Morley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 02 Apr 2003 12:12:19 +0000
        Subj:   Re: God Save the Queen in British Theaters

[2]     From:   Kevin De Ornellas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 02 Apr 2003 13:22:14 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen

[3]     From:   Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 14:01:39 +0100
        Subj:   SHK 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen

[4]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 02 Apr 2003 14:31:17 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Carol Morley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 02 Apr 2003 12:12:19 +0000
Subject:        Re: God Save the Queen in British Theaters

Being just old enough to remember the practice of playing the National
Anthem in both theatres and cinemas (and the mad dash of adults towing
children to the exit to escape during the first few bars), I was
delighted by Michael Bogdanov's brilliant ironic use of that ghastly
galliard to conclude the final part of the ESC's Wars of the Roses. Who,
after all would want to stand up for Henry Tudor?

Best to All,
Carol Morley

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kevin De Ornellas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 02 Apr 2003 13:22:14 +0000
Subject: 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen

>What should we call that part of the British Isles that isn't Scotland,
>Wales, Ireland or Ulster?

Don, by "Ireland and Ulster", did you mean "The Republic of Ireland and
Northern Ireland"?  Please be very careful about what you understand
"Ulster" to be: that sort of thing really matters here.

Kevin De Ornellas
Queen's University, Belfast

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 2 Apr 2003 14:01:39 +0100
Subject: Re: God Save the Queen
Comment:        SHK 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen

Terence Hawkes rebukes me for calling Parliament "sovereign":

"It is certainly not 'sovereign'. All of its legislation requires the
assent of a higher body -the monarch- before it becomes law. This can
be, and has been, witheld or delayed. At the opening of each parliament,
the monarch publicly outlines the forthcoming legislative programme of
what he or she calls  'my government'."

The Parliament Act of 1949 suggests something very different.

As far back as the 17thC, Sir Edward Coke argued that, if the King was
overseas, his Lieutenant was empowered to call a Parliament, and that
that Parliament should not be subject to automatic dissolution upon the
King's return: Institutes IV, Cap. I, "Of the High and Most Honourable
Court of Parliament", pp.6-7, Institutes II, "Magna Carta, Cap. II",
p.26. In other words, there is no such thing as a King outside of
Parliament, even when the King-in-Parliament is a proxy (Commentators
such as Coke and Blackstone imply that there never was such a thing as a
King outside of Parliament). By far the most important thing to remember
in any discussion of Parliament is that it "consisteth of the Kings
Majesty sitting there as in his Royall politick capacity, and of the
three Estates of the Realm": Institutes IV, Cap.1, p.1

martin

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 02 Apr 2003 14:31:17 -0400
Subject: 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0632 Re: God Save the Queen

Terence Hawkes writes,

>All of its [Parliament's] legislation requires the
>assent of a higher body -the monarch- before it becomes law. This can
>be, and has been, witheld or delayed.

According to "Companion to the Standing Orders and guide to the
Proceedings of the Lords", "The power to refuse Royal Assent was last
exercised in 1708, when Queen Anne refused Her Assent to a bill for
settling the Militia in Scotland."  The web page for this document is
http://www.parliament.the-stationery-office.co.uk/pa/ld/ldcomp/compso29.htm

The principle of responsible government was brought in somewhat later in
Canada, in the Rebellion Losses Bill of 1849, passed despite the
governor-general's personal qualms and the violence of an angry mob
which burned down Parliament.  It hasn't sat in Quebec City since.

More importantly, it strikes me that there must be at least one
commonwealth country that's declared itself to be a republic by act of
parliament.  Such a fundamental constitutional change would seem to be
the function of a sovereign assembly, if only de facto.

Yours,
Sean.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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