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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: May ::
Re: Hirsh and "To Be"
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0839  Friday, 2 May 2003

[1]     From:   Claude Caspar <
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        Date:   Thursday, 1 May 2003 08:02:39 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0828 Re: Hirsh and "To Be"

[2]     From:   Claude Caspar <
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        Date:   Thursday, 1 May 2003 10:52:21 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0828 Re: Hirsh and "To Be"

[3]     From:   Martin Steward <
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        Date:   Thursday, 1 May 2003 14:10:13 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0828 Re: Hirsh and "To Be"

[4]     From:   David Bishop <
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        Date:   Thursday, 1 May 2003 15:37:48 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0828 Re: Hirsh and "To Be"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Claude Caspar <
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Date:           Thursday, 1 May 2003 08:02:39 -0400
Subject: 14.0828 Re: Hirsh and "To Be"
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0828 Re: Hirsh and "To Be"

>George Steiner tells us that we know
>the name of the first person to read without moving his lips, Augustine.

This was from memory 30(?) years ago. For me, what is significant is the
phenomena, though I certainly prefer knowing the "facts."  Now, I must
reread Steiner- was it "After Babel?" Needless to say, something I
always secretly try not to forget, is that this is first
known/historically recorded case, but certainly not the first. No one
noticed the nobody silently smiling in the corner.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Claude Caspar <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 1 May 2003 10:52:21 -0400
Subject: 14.0828 Re: Hirsh and "To Be"
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0828 Re: Hirsh and "To Be"

>>we know the name of the first person to read without moving his lips,
>>Augustine.
>
>Actually, I think it was St. Jerome, whom Augustine witnessed at this
>miraculous work.

http://www.stanford.edu/class/history34q/readings/Manguel/Silent_Readers.htm
l

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 1 May 2003 14:10:13 +0100
Subject: 14.0828 Re: Hirsh and "To Be"
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0828 Re: Hirsh and "To Be"

>>we know
>>the name of the first person to read without moving his lips,
>>Augustine.
>
>Actually, I think it was St. Jerome, whom Augustine witnessed at this
>miraculous work.
>
>>George Steiner tells us that we know
>>the name of the first person to read without moving his lips, Augustine.
>
>A curious distortion.  Augustine _reports_ that Ambrose did so.

It was Ambrose: see St Augustine, Confessions, VI.ii.3. Augustine
doesn't appear to have thought it that odd, or clever.

m

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Bishop <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 1 May 2003 15:37:48 -0700
Subject: 14.0828 Re: Hirsh and "To Be"
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0828 Re: Hirsh and "To Be"

Suppose Hamlet, alone onstage, speaks a soliloquy. He's looking in the
direction of the audience, but is he speaking the speech "directly" to
them?  In some productions the answer would be yes, in others no. We can
say that easily. The question of exactly what it means is more
difficult. A character may speak in character to the audience, or step a
variety of distances out of character. None of this may be a problem for
the audience--or it may. The critic seeking to describe the difference
in each case may be more puzzled.

I don't know what edition R.A. Cantrell is using, but in the Arden 2
Claudius speaks, then Hamlet enters, speaks and exits, then Claudius
speaks again. This makes more complicated arguments, about how Hamlet's
overhearing Claudius would affect the play, unnecessary.

Best wishes,
David Bishop

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