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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: May ::
Re: Shakespeare as an Italian
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0874  Thursday, 8 May 2003

[1]     From:   Hugh Grady <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 7 May 2003 11:27:57 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????

[2]     From:   Claude Casper <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 7 May 2003 11:58:40 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????

[3]     From:   Nancy Charlton <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 07 May 2003 10:31:30 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????

[4]     From:   Roger Parisious <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 7 May 2003 13:58:47 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hugh Grady <
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Date:           Wednesday, 7 May 2003 11:27:57 -0400
Subject: 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????

Wasn't this an "April Fool's" joke? Should have been, if it wasn't.

Hugh Grady

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Claude Casper <
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Date:           Wednesday, 7 May 2003 11:58:40 -0400
Subject: 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????

>Was Shakespeare Italian?

Aristotle suggests that we should be more influenced by what should have
happened than what did in fact occur.

I am firmly in the campo of Shakespeare the Magnificent!-

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nancy Charlton <
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Date:           Wednesday, 07 May 2003 10:31:30 -0700
Subject: 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????

>Have any new opinions surfaced regarding Shakespeare as an
>Italian?

>Christine Gray

>Was Shakespeare Italian?
>Dateline: 05/18/00

>Over the centuries scholars have been puzzled by Shakespeare's
>profound
>knowledge of Italian. Shakespeare had an impressive familiarity
>with
>stories by Italian authors such as Giovanni Boccaccio, Matteo
>Bandello,
>and Masuccio Salernitano. In an attempt to solve the mystery of
>Shakespeare's Italian aptitude, one former teacher of literature
>has
>unleashed a new hypothesis on a world eager to hear anything
>fresh about
>the Bard.

>Retired Sicilian professor Martino Iuvara claims that Shakespeare
>was,
>in fact, not English at all, but Italian.

A complete report would probably also credit the considerable but unsung
contributions of Maestro Sforzando Croccashinola, who is credited with a
privately-circulated translation of Psalm 46 in which the disputed verse
10 was rendered, not ". . . rompera gli archi e spezzera le lance . . ."
but "rompera gli archi e crollera le lanza."

The maestro's rationale for this startling emendation was unfortunately
destroyed in an eruption of Vesuvio, but those of his persuasion take
this a further fulfillment of the prophecy of this Salmo 46, and an
ineluctable corroboration of the possibility that Gugielmo Crollalanza
was indeed the very playwright who fit the description of the Other Man
who had the same name as William Shakespeare who wrote plays similarly
titled: Il Tempesto, Gli  Operi d'Amore Perdute, Otello, Amleto,
Macbetto, Enrico IV, V, VI, Ricardo II e III and others. There is still
some question, however, that King John is in any way related to Don
Giovanni, that now pretty well thought to be the work of Dr. Faustus.
Croccashinola's devotees in their more enthusiastic moments speculate
that Crollalanza was cousin-german to Joe Green, who adapted so many of
the plays as operas.

Nancy Charlton

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Parisious <
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Date:           Wednesday, 7 May 2003 13:58:47 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????

>Have any new opinions surfaced regarding Shakespeare
>as an Italian?

This was originally promulgated as the John Florio theory. And was
written up in that excellent but ill-fated publication, "The Literary
Digest", as recorded in the "Guide to Periodical Literature", around
l928.The revised version of the theory attributing the works to Florio's
father resurfaced as a new discovery in some American newspapers of the
fifties and again about twenty years later. Neither report seems to have
sparked further recorded discussion.

A book (or possibly two, wildly divergent dates were given) was
published in Italian and the first version should be listed on the
microfilm of Joseph Galland's unfinished Bibliotheca Anti-Stratfordiana
(later l940's). I may have the citation slightly off here as I have no
written source handy.

The version on SHAKSPER appears to be the most extended summary in the
English language.

By the way, there is no Earl of Essex school of Shakespeare. One writer,
Latham Davies, or Davis, published a reconstruction of LLL as a masque.
He assigned it to Essex in a large volume published in New York about
l903.The work seems to have had no reviews and certainly was not,
despite its length, calculated to inspire emulation. The most
interesting thing about this publication are the several raw
accounts(unassimilated by the author) of previous efforts to predate the
standard Shakespearean chronology. There are an impressive number of
these, many by Stratfordians. Long before J. Thomas Looney there was an
impressive body of work moving the closure of Shakespeare's canon to the
earlier years of the seventeenth century.

Roger Parisious

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