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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: May ::
Re: Shakespeare and the Hokey Pokey
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0900  Monday, 12 May 2003

[1]     From:   Claude Casper <
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        Date:   Friday, 9 May 2003 12:57:21 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0882 Re: Shakespeare and the Hokey Pokey

[2]     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Friday, 9 May 2003 13:00:29 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 14.0882 Re: Shakespeare and the Hokey Pokey

[3]     From:   Claude Casper <
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        Date:   Friday, 9 May 2003 12:59:54 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0882 Re: Shakespeare and the Hokey Pokey

[4]     From:   Sam Small <
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        Date:   Monday, 12 May 2003 11:45:37 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0882 Re: Shakespeare and the Hokey Pokey


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Claude Casper <
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Date:           Friday, 9 May 2003 12:57:21 -0400
Subject: 14.0882 Re: Shakespeare and the Hokey Pokey
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0882 Re: Shakespeare and the Hokey Pokey

>LONDO:  Here.  6000 years of recorded history.  A history which includes
>remarkable composers, astonishing symphonies!  But what is the one song
>that half of them sing to their children, generation after generation?
>                          [sings]
>      You put your right hand in, you take your right hand out,
>      You put your whole self in and you turn yourself about.
>      You do the Hokey Pokey and you give a little shout.
>      That's what it's all about.
>                          [speaks]
>It does not mean anything.  I've been studying it for seven days.  I had
>the computer analyze it.  I swear to you:  it does not mean a thing!

Well, isn't this the perfect paradigm of the child's game of fort/Da!
that Freud, et ali, make so much of? It appeals to the most archaic of
latent memories. the secret of all Art, why the pratfall never fails.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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Date:           Friday, 9 May 2003 13:00:29 -0400
Subject: Re: Shakespeare and the Hokey Pokey
Comment:        SHK 14.0882 Re: Shakespeare and the Hokey Pokey

In Britain, the song (and dance) is known as the Hokey-Kokey. Much
nicer.

T. Hawkes

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Claude Casper <
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Date:           Friday, 9 May 2003 12:59:54 -0400
Subject: 14.0882 Re: Shakespeare and the Hokey Pokey
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0882 Re: Shakespeare and the Hokey Pokey

The origin of fort da: http://www.fortda.org/origin.html

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sam Small <
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Date:           Monday, 12 May 2003 11:45:37 +0100
Subject: 14.0882 Re: Shakespeare and the Hokey Pokey
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0882 Re: Shakespeare and the Hokey Pokey

It seems like John W. Kennedy's research is suspect once more.  Hokey
Pokey is American.  Written by Roland Lawrence (Larry) LaPrise, who
concocted the song along with two fellow musicians in the late 1940s for
the ski crowd in Sun Valley, Idaho. The group, the Ram Trio, recorded
the song in 1949. In 1953, bandleader Ray Anthony bought the rights and
recorded The Hokey Pokey on the B-side of another novelty record, The
Bunny Hop. After the Ram Trio disbanded in the 1960s, country star Roy
Acuff's publishing company bought the rights to The Hokey Pokey.
Copyright 1950, Acuff-Rose Music Inc.  When it finally reached London
and England it became Hokey Kokey.  Don't ask me why.

SAM SMALL
http://www.passioninpieces.co.uk

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