2003

Barque does not bark

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0878  Thursday, 8 May 2003

From:           Elliott H. Stone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 May 2003 22:14:46 EDT
Subject: 14.0865 Barque does not bark
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0865 Barque does not bark

I am sure that all Shakespeare fans will be happy to once again have it
confirmed that our dramatist is entitled to an "A" in geography!
Prospero did not embark from the gates of Milan on a sea going vessel.
It is more understandable that he left in a row boat! The Tempest I. 2
144 "In few, they hurried us aboard a BARQUE, Bore us some leagues to
sea--" My American Heritage Dictionary defines "Bark also barque- 1. A
sailing ship with from three to five masts--2. A small vessel that is
propelled by oars or sails--".  It is quite clear that even today you
can travel around Northern Italy by a barge or a boat on a canal. It
certainly was the preferred method of travel in the 16th century. Why is
it hard for us to believe that Shakespeare just got it right? We
certainly can believe that Shakespeare never made it to Bermuda but the
jury is still out as to whether he made it to Milan, Naples or a small
island off the coast of Sicily!

Best,
Elliott H. Stone

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let slip the dogs of war

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0877  Thursday, 8 May 2003

From:           Brian Willis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 May 2003 16:42:39 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        let slip the dogs of war

Has anybody noticed that Henry V is probably the most performed
Shakespeare play this summer?  Shakespeare in the Park (NYC) is working
on it now as well. Is this usually the case in times of war? I suppose
it might have to do with a leader manufacturing reasons to wage war in
order to distract from domestic issues. But it lends credence to this
play's resonance as an anti-war piece. At least that is how I see it.

Brian Willis

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Re: New Energy Needed For Cultural Studies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0875  Thursday, 8 May 2003

From:           Claude Casper <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 May 2003 11:38:08 -0400
Subject: 14.0866 Re: New Energy Needed For Cultural Studies
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0866 Re: New Energy Needed For Cultural Studies

>Not all is lost. The discovery of culture among even chimpanzees and
>orangutans has gotten recent wide publicity--here's the link to an NPR
>report on the topic.

Surely, you are not falling for the that old canard about a room full of
particularly bright-eyes monkeys typing Hamlet- perhaps, one of Peele's
lesser works!-.

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Re: Macbeth

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0876  Thursday, 8 May 2003

[1]     From:   Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 07 May 2003 16:28:07 +0000
        Subj:   A Measure of Macbeth

[2]     From:   L. Swilley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 May 2003 12:19:17 -0500
        Subj:   A comeuppance for Lady Macbeth


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 07 May 2003 16:28:07 +0000
Subject:        A Measure of Macbeth

Caramba Theatre Company's Macbeth at the Shakespeare Institute was a
treat.  The atmosphere at the Banquet scene post-prandial chat between
the gruesome twosome was portrayed with tremendous reality. It was worth
the admission fee in itself. And good use of playing the play in the
round (oblong) was made. Plenty of potential all round - and hopefully
enough venues to keep the Company going. Caramba should become
established in Stratford if only to provide some relief from the awful
RSC where Measure (on at the same time but with seats and booze at four
times the price) was deeply insignificant. The only flashing Willy was
not the author but Bernardine who Sean Holmes (directing one assumes)
had stumble about in the nude. As I stared at the Avon swans through the
bottom of an interval glass of Pimms No1 on the terrace and thought dark
thoughts, a reviewing acquaintance, taking the air  himself, reported
hearing a foyer conversation involving the phrase "...the most
tedious...". The current tourist drop at Stratford isn't all to do with
world events I fear.

Graham Hall

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           L. Swilley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 May 2003 12:19:17 -0500
Subject:        A comeuppance for Lady Macbeth

L. Swilley asked, re the TV production I recounted:" Fascinating.  But
what did the production do with Lady M's lines: I, v, 44ff and I, vii,
54ff. ???  Were they deleted?"

To which, James Doyle:

 "Not at all, as far as I remember: the former were delivered in the
child's bedroom the latter I can't remember the location.  Seeing a
woman saying 'I have known what it is to give suck' while looking at an
empty cot is quite a powerful image, to me..."

Curioser and curioser.  I guess the point is that when this woman
witnesses the  effects of one who really carries out something like that
which she threatened (I,v, 44ff), she snaps.

      L. Swilley

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Re: Shakespeare as an Italian

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0874  Thursday, 8 May 2003

[1]     From:   Hugh Grady <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 May 2003 11:27:57 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????

[2]     From:   Claude Casper <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 May 2003 11:58:40 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????

[3]     From:   Nancy Charlton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 07 May 2003 10:31:30 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????

[4]     From:   Roger Parisious <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 May 2003 13:58:47 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hugh Grady <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 May 2003 11:27:57 -0400
Subject: 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????

Wasn't this an "April Fool's" joke? Should have been, if it wasn't.

Hugh Grady

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Claude Casper <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 May 2003 11:58:40 -0400
Subject: 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????

>Was Shakespeare Italian?

Aristotle suggests that we should be more influenced by what should have
happened than what did in fact occur.

I am firmly in the campo of Shakespeare the Magnificent!-

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nancy Charlton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 07 May 2003 10:31:30 -0700
Subject: 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????

>Have any new opinions surfaced regarding Shakespeare as an
>Italian?

>Christine Gray

>Was Shakespeare Italian?
>Dateline: 05/18/00

>Over the centuries scholars have been puzzled by Shakespeare's
>profound
>knowledge of Italian. Shakespeare had an impressive familiarity
>with
>stories by Italian authors such as Giovanni Boccaccio, Matteo
>Bandello,
>and Masuccio Salernitano. In an attempt to solve the mystery of
>Shakespeare's Italian aptitude, one former teacher of literature
>has
>unleashed a new hypothesis on a world eager to hear anything
>fresh about
>the Bard.

>Retired Sicilian professor Martino Iuvara claims that Shakespeare
>was,
>in fact, not English at all, but Italian.

A complete report would probably also credit the considerable but unsung
contributions of Maestro Sforzando Croccashinola, who is credited with a
privately-circulated translation of Psalm 46 in which the disputed verse
10 was rendered, not ". . . rompera gli archi e spezzera le lance . . ."
but "rompera gli archi e crollera le lanza."

The maestro's rationale for this startling emendation was unfortunately
destroyed in an eruption of Vesuvio, but those of his persuasion take
this a further fulfillment of the prophecy of this Salmo 46, and an
ineluctable corroboration of the possibility that Gugielmo Crollalanza
was indeed the very playwright who fit the description of the Other Man
who had the same name as William Shakespeare who wrote plays similarly
titled: Il Tempesto, Gli  Operi d'Amore Perdute, Otello, Amleto,
Macbetto, Enrico IV, V, VI, Ricardo II e III and others. There is still
some question, however, that King John is in any way related to Don
Giovanni, that now pretty well thought to be the work of Dr. Faustus.
Croccashinola's devotees in their more enthusiastic moments speculate
that Crollalanza was cousin-german to Joe Green, who adapted so many of
the plays as operas.

Nancy Charlton

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Parisious <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 May 2003 13:58:47 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0865 Shakespeare as an Italian????

>Have any new opinions surfaced regarding Shakespeare
>as an Italian?

This was originally promulgated as the John Florio theory. And was
written up in that excellent but ill-fated publication, "The Literary
Digest", as recorded in the "Guide to Periodical Literature", around
l928.The revised version of the theory attributing the works to Florio's
father resurfaced as a new discovery in some American newspapers of the
fifties and again about twenty years later. Neither report seems to have
sparked further recorded discussion.

A book (or possibly two, wildly divergent dates were given) was
published in Italian and the first version should be listed on the
microfilm of Joseph Galland's unfinished Bibliotheca Anti-Stratfordiana
(later l940's). I may have the citation slightly off here as I have no
written source handy.

The version on SHAKSPER appears to be the most extended summary in the
English language.

By the way, there is no Earl of Essex school of Shakespeare. One writer,
Latham Davies, or Davis, published a reconstruction of LLL as a masque.
He assigned it to Essex in a large volume published in New York about
l903.The work seems to have had no reviews and certainly was not,
despite its length, calculated to inspire emulation. The most
interesting thing about this publication are the several raw
accounts(unassimilated by the author) of previous efforts to predate the
standard Shakespearean chronology. There are an impressive number of
these, many by Stratfordians. Long before J. Thomas Looney there was an
impressive body of work moving the closure of Shakespeare's canon to the
earlier years of the seventeenth century.

Roger Parisious

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
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