2003

Re: Editions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0858  Wednesday, 7 May 2003

[1]     From:   Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 04 May 2003 10:29:14 +0000
        Subj:   Big thick books

[2]     From:   James Doyle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 5 May 2003 20:01:24 +0100
        Subj:   Bedford/St Martin's Texts and Contexts editions


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 04 May 2003 10:29:14 +0000
Subject:        Big thick books

Compendium editions are jade's stale nourishment for the drab and the
indolent. Raid the second hand bookshops and haggle for single play
editions that take your fancy and glue 'em together. The marginalia by
previous owners often provide more substantial insight, references and
wit than a wilderness of professional editors could in a millennium of
their scribbling. Get your rich spinster aunty to buy you the Norton
Facsimile for your birthday as a long stop and reade him, therefore; and
againe, and againe.

Good hunting,
Graham Hall

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Doyle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 5 May 2003 20:01:24 +0100
Subject:        Bedford/St Martin's Texts and Contexts editions

This series was mentioned in passing by during the discussion on Single
Volume editions.  I've only read two of these - Taming of the Shrew
(edited by Frances Dolan), and Midsummer Night's Dream (which I can't
find at the moment).

I found the former to be excellent; there were good, straightforward
notes on the text, but probably not enough for a student new to
Shakespeare's language, while the essays which took up 224 of the 326
pages were very thorough and illuminating.

The latter, while structured in the same way, I found less satisfactory,
as the essays didn't cover nearly as much ground, or in as much depth.
I think the UK price is about ?12 or ?13, so this wouldn't be an
economic purchase here.

I don't know which other titles are available, but on the basis of the
former, I'd definitely take a look, but check before you buy!

James Doyle

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Re: The Strachey Letter

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0857  Wednesday, 7 May 2003

[1]     From:   Bob Grumman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 2 May 2003 15:47:06 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.0844 Re: The Strachey Letter

[2]     From:   Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 03 May 2003 11:40:40 +0000
        Subj:   Barking Mad


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bob Grumman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 2 May 2003 15:47:06 -0400
Subject: 14.0844 Re: The Strachey Letter
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0844 Re: The Strachey Letter

>For those who may be interested, there is an informative discussion in
>Diana Price's latest book on the dating of the Tempest by the three most
>cited sources.  The discussion includes mention of Ariosto's ORLANDO
>FURIOSO, and cites several parallel passages found in to the Tempest
>along side of Strachey's letter.  Bob Grumman's comment on the
>importance of literary history is well taken.  Finding sources can be a
>valuable source for interpretation.
>
>Ira

Diana Price, a Shakespeare-rejecting crank, tries to make out that
Shakespeare could as easily have been influenced by Ariosto as by
Strachey. Here's an example of her kind of propaganda.  First, she
quotes Strachey:

"a dreadful storm...which swelling, and roaring as it were by fits...at
length did beat all light from heaven; which like an hell of darkness
turned black upon us..the heavens look'd so black upon us"

Then Ariosto: "With weather so tempestuous and so dark,/ And thick black
clouds ...
......

Nor less, nor much less fearful is the sound/ The cruel tempest in the
tackle makes"

Then from The Tempest (I.ii.2-3):

"Miranda: But the wild waters in this roar, allay them./ The sky, it
seems, would pour down stinking pitch"  She neglects to finish what
Miranda says, to wit: "But that the sea, mounting to the welkin's cheek/
Dashes the fire out."

Obviously, she wants us to think Shakespeare's "black pitch" matches
Ariosto's "thick black" as much as Shakespeare's "roar" matches
Strachey's "roaring," but doesn't want us to notice, or never noticed
herself, that the key image in Strachey, the storm's beating "all light
from heaven" is echoed by Shakespeare's image of the sea's dashing out a
light in the heavens.

I wouldn't be surprised if the Strachey passage were similarly treated.

--Bob G.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 03 May 2003 11:40:40 +0000
Subject:        Barking Mad

The storm over the wreck of Old World colonizers of New World
territories as a  source for The Tempest leaves one with a sinking
feeling.  Sources are fair weather friends and far from plain sailing.
Was it not Inga-Stina Ewbank, Cicely Palser Havely, Sister Miriam
Wasername, Molly Mahood or someone of such ilk who pointed out some
score of sources cited for  "bowgh wawgh" i.e. "woof woof" (TLN 526-7)?
Barks and barques, perhaps he just would have heard such tales over a
glass darkly in The Falcon (or whatever it was called in his time) but a
stumble from New Place of a Saturday afternoon.  My old brain is
troubled.

Best,
Graham Hall

_______________________________________________________________
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Shakespeare and Religion Conference

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0855  Wednesday, 7 May 2003

From:           Dennis Taylor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 2 May 2003 17:45:46 -0400
Subject:        Shakespeare and Religion Conference

Dear Colleagues,

Are you aware of this interesting, even important, conference?
Information is available at
http://www.wheaton.edu/learnres/shakespeare/index.html

I enclose the program below:
2003 Shakespeare Institue
Wheaton College
Program
(All sessions will be held on the third floor of Blanchard Hall in
Lecture
Room 339.)

Thursday, June 5

1:30 pm
Registration

2:00 pm
Welcome and Announcements
Invocation

2:15 pm
"Meta-drama in Hamlet and Macbeth"
Peter Milward

3:15 pm
Refreshments

3:45 pm
"Hamlet and Protestant Aural Theater"
Grace Tiffany

7:30 pm
"Reformation/Counter Reformation Macbeth"
Maurice Hunt
Friday, June 6

9:00 am
"'I Could Not say Amen': Prayer and Providence in Macbeth"
Robert Miola

10:00 am
Refreshments

10:30 am
"Shakespeare and the Problems of Self-love in Medieval and Renaissance
Theology, Julius  Caesar, Hamlet and Macbeth"
Robert (Robin) Reid

11:30 am
Concurrent Seminars
"Perspectives on Teaching Hamlet"
Grace Tiffany

"Editing and Writing for a Shakespearean Journal"
John Mahon

"Contemporary Poems in Response to Shakespeare: Reading from a New
Anthology"
Paul Willis

12:35 pm
Lunch

2:15 pm
"Macbeth's Ghosts and Calvin's Stage"
Kristen Poole

3:20 pm
Refreshments

4:00 pm
"Providence in Julius Caesar"
John Mahon

6:00 pm
Dinner (Anderson Commons)

8:00 pm
Dramatic Presentation
Saturday, June 7

9:15 am
 Concurrent Seminars

"Cultural Catholicities: New Contexts for Shakespeare"
Robert Miola

"Macbeth as a new kind of morality play"
Robin Reid

10:20 am
Refreshments

10:50 am
"Cobbling Souls in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar"
Maurice Hunt

11:55 am
"Topics Awaiting Further Study by Christian Shakespearean Scholars"
Peter Milward

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Final Call for Papers: Shakespeare's

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0856  Wednesday, 7 May 2003

From:           Robert Shaughnessy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 6 May 2003 16:38:43 +0100
Subject:        Final Call for Papers: Shakespeare's Children/Children's
Shakespeares

(Apololgies for cross-posting)

Centre for Renaissance Studies Annual Conference
(in association with the National Centre for Research in Children's
Literature)

SHAKESPEARE'S CHILDREN / CHILDREN'S SHAKESPEARES

FINAL CALL FOR PAPERS

11 OCTOBER 2003

AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SURREY ROEHAMPTON

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: CATHERINE BELSEY

SPEAKERS INCLUDE

Richard Burt
Kate Chedzgoy
Carol Chillington Rutter
Michael Rosen

The child - as agent, symbol, witness or victim - is a recurrent
preoccupation in Shakespeare's work. Children also occupied a pivotal
role in the cultures of performance of early modern England. This
conference will explore these matters in both historical and modern
settings. It will investigate what the child meant and what it meant to
be a child for Shakespeare and his contemporaries, and trace the ways in
which Shakespeare has functioned subsequently in education, performance
and popular culture.

Proposals are invited for short papers (20 minutes), panel presentations
and workshops on all aspects of the subject of Shakespeare and childhood
worldwide. Topics for consideration might include:

.       Representations of the child in Shakespeare's plays
.       Early modern constructions of childhood and youth
.       Boy actresses/children's playing companies
.       Child performers on stage and screen
.       Adults playing children
.       Shakespeare in primary and secondary education
.       Shakespeare and Theatre-in-Education
.       Narrative treatments of Shakespeare
.       Illustrated editions and versions
.       Abbreviation, bowdlerisation and abridgement
.       Shakespeare and the changing curriculum around the world
.       Shakespeare in youth culture: allusions, citations, spin-offs
and parodies
.       Cartoon Shakespeares
.       Shakespeare and Writing for Children
.       Shakespeare on the Internet
.       Shakespeare and Childhood in the Novel
.       Shakespeare and Children's/Youth Theatre
.       Shakespeare, Childhood and the Visual Arts

Informal enquires and abstracts (no more than 300 words) plus a brief
CV, by 31 MAY 2003, to:

Dr Robert Shaughnessy                           Susanne Greenhalgh
Reader                                          Senior Lecturer
Drama, Theatre and Performance                  Drama, Theatre and Performance
University of Surrey Roehampton                 University of Surrey
Roehampton
Roehampton Lane                                 Roehampton Lane
London                                          London
SW15 5PH                                                SW15 5PH

Tel:    0208  392 3414                          Tel:    0208  392 3334
Fax:    0208  392 3289                          Fax:    0208  392 3289

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

For further information on the Centre for Renaissance Studies, go to
http://www.roehampton.ac.uk/renaissance/

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: King John, Titus, Peele

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0854  Wednesday, 7 May 2003

From:           Claude Casper <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 2 May 2003 15:48:08 -0400
Subject: 14.0752 Re: King John, Titus, Peele
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0752 Re: King John, Titus, Peele

However one views the question of collaboration, don't miss Jonathan
Bates' review of our very own Brian Vickers' book, "Shakespeare,
Co-Author," in this weeks TLS.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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