2003

New Energy Needed For Cultural Studies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0838  Thursday, 1 May 2003

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Apr 2003 13:23:12 -0400
Subject:        New Energy Needed For Cultural Studies

http://chronicle.com/free/v49/i34/34b00701.htm

From the issue of Chronicle of Higher Ed dated May 2, 2003

Expanding the Agenda of Cultural Research

By PETER N. STEARNS

For the past several decades, key disciplines in or around the
humanities, including my own field of history, have been strongly
influenced by what has been termed "the cultural turn" -- the belief
that culture influences, indeed powerfully shapes, the human condition.

In this pervasive view, key aspects of life can best be understood by
exploring the fundamental beliefs and assumptions of a culture and (in
some formulations especially) the language in which they are expressed.
Some of the attention to the cultural turn began in the 1960s, with the
period's new sympathy for the styles and values of various groups, and
then firmed up with a growing interest in the findings of cultural
anthropology and in various theoretical formulations from gurus like
Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida.

Recently, however, the fascination with culture seems to be waning:
Historians, for example, are conducting symposiums and editing volumes
about "what comes next," and erstwhile culturalists are publicly
bemoaning the decline of interest in relevant theory. Aside from
demonstrating that humanists are not immune to faddism, the transition
invites some comment about the state of cultural research more
generally. For, while a rebalancing of scholarly priorities seems
inevitable, it is important to keep oscillations within bounds.

For the full article, click on the link above.

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S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
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editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: King John, Titus, Peele

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0837  Thursday, 1 May 2003

From:           Bob Grumman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Apr 2003 15:41:02 -0400
Subject: 14.0826 Re: King John, Titus, Peele
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0826 Re: King John, Titus, Peele

>Jim Carroll's objections that 'one did not go into one's backyard and
>hunt panthers in Rome' shows that he must have a very strange idea of
>Elizabethan drama. Dare I mention such things as dramatic conventions
>and the audience's imagination?
>
>On the dramaturgy of Act 1, if Mr. Carroll reads on to my ch. 7 he will
>find an analysis of Peele's dramaturgy -- based in part on the detailed
>studies of Werner Senn, Gregor Sarrazin, MacDonald Jackson, and Al
>Braunmuller -- which shows many similarities of structure and function
>with Peele.
>
>As to the 20 independent linguistic tests I have documented, I don't
>intend to argue the toss with him, since he's made it very clear that he
>doesn't intend to be persuaded. Ars longa, vita brevis est.

I completely agree with Brian Vickers that he clearly has no chance
against the insightful criticisms of his position that Jim Carroll has
made.

I have only one comment to add, which is that I find it interesting that
Vickers and like minds find it as easy as Shakespeare-rejecters to tell
us that Shakespeare could never have picked up this or that scrap of
information--as though a certain school was the only place the scrap was
available, and not the stray book (aside from Holinshed and other books
we know Shakespeare read), or the friend with the odd bit of data, or a
fellow actor, or a sailor in a bar.  Etc.

--Bob G.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Problems in Macbeth

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0835  Thursday, 1 May 2003

From:           Janet Costa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Apr 2003 21:45:56 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 14.0820 Re: Problems in Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0820 Re: Problems in Macbeth

L. Swilly asks: Fascinating.  But what did the production do with Lady
M's lines: I, v, 44ff and I, vii, 54ff. ???  Were they deleted?

The problem here is a misunderstanding in Doyle's synopsis.

The film, Macbeth on the Estate, directed by Michael Bogdonov (1996),
shows Lady Macbeth receiving the letter as a message left by Macbeth on
the answering machine. She goes into the nursery which has a chest of
drawers and an empty crib. On the dresser is a photograph of an 18 -24
months old child. The infant has apparently died (I would think sudden
infant death or the drug wars), but the room and bed have been
definitely used. The "unsex me here" speech is given by Lady M in voice
over as she sinks to the floor between the chest and the crib.

It is the most emotionally charged treatment of Lady Macbeth that I have
ever seen on film, especially when directly contrasted to the Polanski.
In the audience I watched it with for the first time, the women were
shocked into stunned, teary silence.

As for the killing of Macduff's children, Bogdanov identifies this
moment (and you could be forgiven for thinking he's absolutely right) as
the one which pushes Lady Macbeth over the edge into insanity.

The film is on videotape at The Shakespeare Institute Library. It was a
production of ITV I believe, although I cannot say they would still have
a copy. When I was working on the construction of the Film Section for
The AllShakespeare.com Website, I published an essay on the film, but
there are no words to convey the power Bogdanov brings to the text on
film.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Macbeth's Hired Thugs

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0836  Thursday, 1 May 2003

From:           S. Greenhalgh <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 1 May 2003 10:40:12 +0100
Subject: 14.0814 Re: Macbeth's Hired Thugs
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0814 Re: Macbeth's Hired Thugs

The UK TV production of Macbeth that James Doyle refers to is Penny
Woolcock's Macbeth on the Estate (BBC2 1997), which was filmed on the
Ladywood estate in Birmingham where her previous documentary Shakespeare
on the Estate was made.  This features Michael Bogdanov attempting to
"convert" the multi-racial locals to Shakespeare through performing
their own versions.  Children and their fates in a criminalized,
brutalized community is a theme of the entire Macbeth production (the
witches are also played by kids), as in several other of Woolcock's
films set in English council estates and using local inhabitants in
fictional roles based on their own lives.  In an article forthcoming in
Remaking Shakespeare: Shakespeare across media, genres and cultures,
forthcoming from Palgrave Macmillan, I discuss both films (apologies for
the plug).  Woolcock is, in my view, an extremely interesting
film-maker, as well as being one of the few women to have filmed
Shakespeare - her film of John Adam's opera The Death of Klinghoffer
premieres on UK's Channel 4 on  May 24(see an article on this in today's
Guardian www.guardian.co.uk/arts/higgins).

Susanne Greenhalgh,
University of Surrey Roehampton.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: A Dream of Hanoi

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.0834  Thursday, 1 May 2003

From:           John W. Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Apr 2003 12:14:23 -0400
Subject: 14.0819
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.0819

Don Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> writes,

>Also, where is this vast influence of Calvinism supposed to have come
>from?  The countries it dominated (Scotland, the Netherlands,
>Switzerland) were hardly the major players in 18th and 19th century
>European economics.

It could be equally well argued that they played (and in the case of the
Netherlands and especially Switzerland, still do play) a far greater
economic role than their intrinsic wealth can justify.

In any case, John Calvin most definitely and explicitly overturned the
traditional Christian prohibition on usury.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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