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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: December ::
Dramatis personae
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2308  Monday, 8 December 2003

[1]     From:   D Bloom <
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        Date:   Friday, 5 Dec 2003 11:36:48 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.2292 Dramatis personae

[2]     From:   Rolland Banker <
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        Date:   Monday, 8 Dec 2003 01:24:39 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Dramatis personae


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           D Bloom <
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Date:           Friday, 5 Dec 2003 11:36:48 -0600
Subject: 14.2292 Dramatis personae
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.2292 Dramatis personae

Bill Arnold responds to some quasi-phantasmagorical responses to his
responses to etc.

"Both are far from the *reality* of the play: even Prince Hamlet calls
the evil Claudius a "villain" and marks him a stereotype; and calls the
good spirit of his departed father "honest" and marks him a credible
witness to a villainous crime of brother murdering brother; and as to
evil Claudius calling Prince Hamlet "son" bespeaks not a whit/wit more
than the *fact* that the evil murderer married the prince's mother and
made him a *step-son* by marriage.

"Neither of the above are real enough to deserve merit of an answer,
anymore than the loaded and "gentle" lawyer-like "Have you stopped
beating your wife" question taught in Law 101."

To which I respond: Dunno, Bill, I have trouble keeping track of reality
as depicted on the front pages of the newspapers, much less in the inner
pages of Shakespeare's alleged texts.

Furthermore, Polonius sounds a lot like a lawyer to me. I'd wager if we
could get a copy of his curriculum vitae we'd find that he'd been bred
for the law. (Besides we all know what a randy lot those lawyers are --
nearly as bad as psychology professors.)

Finally, yes, I'm still beating my wife, though we don't play cribbage
as much as we did before we had babies.

Cheers,
 don

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rolland Banker <
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Date:           Monday, 8 Dec 2003 01:24:39 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Dramatis personae

The Author of the play is God.

Young William Shakespeare wrote / rewrote a play that he originally
intended as a tribute to a living son.

The author's living son died. In the play he (the lost son) becomes
Hamlet Sr.--the ghost (Remember me, remember me); of whom Hamlet in the
play says:

   "...and perhaps
     Out of my weakness and my melancholy,
     As he is very potent with such spirits,
     Abuses me to damn me: I'll have grounds
     More relative than this; the play's the thing
     Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king."

Hamlet is the sophisticated grandson 'to the manor borne' that the
mature William Shakespeare would never have.

Shakespeare's theatrical lineage was 'more relative' and potent than his
biological progeny, and would be the thing to catch many a conscience.

Hence, God made something out of nothing. Only a real God can do that.

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