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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: December ::
When Henry Rallied Troops for One Last Stand
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2355  Friday, 12 December 2003

[1]     From:   Dana Wilson <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Dec 2003 07:22:41 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2339 When Henry Rallied Troops for One Last Stand

[2]     From:   Stephen C. Rose <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Dec 2003 10:25:16 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Response to a Query


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Wilson <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Dec 2003 07:22:41 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 14.2339 When Henry Rallied Troops for One Last Stand
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2339 When Henry Rallied Troops for One Last Stand

Mari, Robin, Steven, et al,

Mari wrote:

>>>Defeat's the denouement no lie can twist
>>
>>I can't seem to get my head around the rhythm of
>this particular line.
>
>Robin, if you give it the more French pronunciation
>of "day-new-MAAWWNN"
>it scans perfectly Iambic.

I think R was referencing WStevens line "Crispin's denouement was a
salad-bed" which doesn't scan at all which is just part of the fun of S,
supposedly.  At any rate, he is supposedly fine in the French, which is
just more of the fun, when self-loathing is fun.

Further, I think you must admit the poem turns on this line, what I
think Harold Bloom would call a crisis.

I can't really say what the line means.  I recall that the obit editor
of the post died last month at 50 after a decade on the job, that might
be a defeat none can twist, but who can say, in 400 yrs the historians
of that day might see our sources as plastic as we see those of 400 yrs
ago.

Subsequent, I have a sense of the bard and the carpenter, jumping off
the page, holographic men, made whole to join the pulsing parade, or
war; but who can say.  The operative authority is Oliver Holmes, "Truth
isn't a soap-bubble, poke holes in it and see what is left."

DEW

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen C. Rose <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Dec 2003 10:25:16 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Response to a Query

Thanks for the comments, poesies and parsings.

Responding to a note I received about why this got written, it reflects
my own sense of where we are in the world -- as a theologian who no
longer espouses religion and a person who believes the Bard helps lift
the veil after a century of futile Freudian, Marxist (and maybe these
days Girardian) systematics. I stand in awe of the Bard in the year I
have actually enjoyed my first acquaintance.

My English major days were in the 50s and never touched WS.  After
Bloom's Genius propelled me to read the Henry IV plays five times, it
just came to me to write sonnets in the WS form.

Most are posted at http://onlinebizplanner.com/rmenu2.htm

I feel the form is almost flawless for the organizing of thoughts.

Cheers. S

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