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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: December ::
Shakespeare's Library
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2423  Monday, 22 December 2003

[1]     From:   Laurie Richards <
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        Date:   Friday, 19 Dec 2003 08:24:59 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2404 Shakespeare's Library

[2]     From:   Geralyn Horton <
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        Date:   Friday, 19 Dec 2003 11:46:02 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2404 Shakespeare's Library


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Laurie Richards <
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Date:           Friday, 19 Dec 2003 08:24:59 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 14.2404 Shakespeare's Library
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2404 Shakespeare's Library

My personal opinion is that Shakespeare had a photographic memory. This
didn't occur to me until after this wonderful man I was dating died and
one of his friends told me he had a photographic memory--and he was
positively brilliant. Back to Will-- I think his education encouraged a
good memory--and his chosen career required a memory better than most.
Let's face it, Shakespeare was an information sponge...and he surrounded
himself with people who had education. Have you ever seen William
Shakespere's small Latine & lesse Greeke by T.W. Baldwin? I haven't been
ambitious enough to read the two large volumes, but I think his
elementary education was intense--a lot more intense than what kids get
nowadays. Books might have been rare, but not as rare as they were a
hundred years before Shakespeare was born. Just a thought: If Will and
company were performing in the winter at various wealthy residents and
possibly boarding in the houses of these wealthy individuals, isn't it
conceivable he could have access to books he wouldn't otherwise have
access to? I suspect that he was a likable fellow and could talk/charm
his way into places an ordinary chap couldn't enter.

~Laurie

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Geralyn Horton <
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Date:           Friday, 19 Dec 2003 11:46:02 -0500
Subject: 14.2404 Shakespeare's Library
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2404 Shakespeare's Library

Philip Tomposki <
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 > writes,

>A successful actor in the 16th and 17th century would need a prodigious
>memory.  I understand that an company might add ten to twelve new plays
>in a season and have as many plays in repertoire at any given time.

The number estimate on the page of M. Wood's "Shakespeare" that I was
reading last night was 30 plays in rep and ready for court appearance.
This was for the first and second year of James' reign.

Geralyn Horton, playwright
Newton, MA
http://www.stagepage.info/monologs/_monologs.html

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