2003

Shakespeare/Bakhtin : Bakhtin/Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2334  Thursday, 11 December 2003

From:           Kathy Dent <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 10 Dec 2003 17:36:10 +0000
Subject: 14.2317 Shakespeare/Bakhtin : Bakhtin/Shakespeare
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.2317 Shakespeare/Bakhtin : Bakhtin/Shakespeare

Dear All

Thanks for the suggestions about carnival and Shakespeare, some of which
I hadn't yet discovered, so that was very helpful.

However, I might not have made my question very clear.  Having read
books like Knowles's _Shakespeare and Carnival_, Bristol's _Carnival and
Theater_ and White & Stallybrass's _Politics and Poetics of
Transgression_, I find that, whilst the subject is carnival, the style
and form is of the fairly conventional academic type and not the kind of
polyphonic, topsy-turvy de-bunkery that the subject matter seems to
invite.  (That said, I have to admit that Bakhtin's own work is not
exactly packed with fart jokes.)  I think Dentith's argument was that
it's easier to write *about* carnival than to adopt it as a method.

It seems that Robert Shaughnessy's suggestion might be closest to what
I'm after.

Grateful thanks to all who replied.

Kathy Dent

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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Rhyming Couplets in "All's Well"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2333  Thursday, 11 December 2003

From:           Lauryn Ethne Sasso <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 10 Dec 2003 11:01:02 -0500
Subject:        Rhyming Couplets in "All's Well"

Hello-

I am currently dramaturging a production of "All's Well" at the
University of Massachusetts, and in my research came across a footnote
in the New Cambridge version of the play text regarding Act 2.1.126-206
(the scene where Helena is petitioning the King to be allowed to cure
him) which quite puzzled me.  The footnote asserted that those 80 lines
shift to rhyming couplets to "suggest the intervention of divine
power."  I have never seen this given as the effect of rhyming couplets
before and wondered if anyone knew anything that could back up this
footnote's claim.

Any and all help appreciated.

-Laury

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare for Kids?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2331  Thursday, 11 December 2003

From:           Douglas Brooks <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 10 Dec 2003 07:46:07 -0600
Subject: 14.2322 Shakespeare for Kids?
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2322 Shakespeare for Kids?

There's a beautiful book entitled Poetry for Young People: William
Shakespeare (New York: Sterling Publishing Company, Inc. 2000).  It's
edited by David Scott Kastan and his daughter Marina Kastan, and
illustrated by Glenn Harrington. The book pairs brief selections from
several of the plays (Portia's "quality of mercy" speech, for example)
with gorgeous illustrations.  Each selection has a glossary on the same
page.  Really a beautiful book and a great way to introduce children to
Shakespeare.   Think Arden 3 picture book for kids.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Merchant of Venice

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2332  Thursday, 11 December 2003

From:           Annalisa Castaldo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 10 Dec 2003 08:46:52 -0500
Subject:        Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Merchant of Venice

A while ago there was a discussion about Shakespearean references on
Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and mention was made of a Merchant of Venice
reference.  Apparently, that discussion hasn't made it to the archives
yet; can anyone remind me what the connection was? Thanks.

Annalisa Castaldo

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare's Library

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2330  Thursday, 11 December 2003

[1]     From:   Douglas Brooks <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Dec 2003 07:26:18 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2319 Shakespeare's Library

[2]     From:   Thomas Larque <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Dec 2003 13:57:54 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2319 Shakespeare's Library

[3]     From:   R. A. Cantrell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Dec 2003 10:29:19 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2319 Shakespeare's Library

[4]     From:   Louis W. Thompson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Dec 2003 13:13:02 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2319 Shakespeare's Library

[5]     From:   Dana Wilson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Dec 2003 16:34:41 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2319 Shakespeare's Library


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas Brooks <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 10 Dec 2003 07:26:18 -0600
Subject: 14.2319 Shakespeare's Library
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2319 Shakespeare's Library

Charles R. Forker has a superb essay on this topic, "How Did Shakespeare
Come by his Books," forthcoming in the next issue of Shakespeare's
Yearbook, scheduled for publication in late January.

In that essay, Forker examines the subject from two perspectives:

"(1) Shakespeare's disposable income, his ability to afford the purchase
of books, with its corollary problem, the cost of books, especially
large and presumably expensive volumes such as Holinshed's Chronicles
and North's Plutarch; and (2) possible private libraries or other
sources from which Shakespeare may have been able to borrow or to which
he may have had regular access."

Best,
Douglas A. Brooks
Editor, Shakespeare Yearbook

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas Larque <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 10 Dec 2003 13:57:54 -0000
Subject: 14.2319 Shakespeare's Library
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2319 Shakespeare's Library

So long as you don't mind the fact that he is countering the
anti-Stratfordians (and therefore refers to their ridiculous views),
Dave Kathman's article on "Shakespeare and Richard Field" at the
Shakespeare Authorship website
(http://shakespeareauthorship.com/field.html) is well worth reading for
the close relationship between many of the books that Richard Field
(Shakespeare's Stratford neighbour in their youth, who became a London
printer) was printing, and a number of the books that Shakespeare was
reading and using in his works.  Although there is no guarantee that
Shakespeare borrowed from Field's library every book printed by Field
that he uses or refers to (other authors also used many of these books
without this connection), Richard Field is certainly a possible source
for some of the books that Shakespeare used.

Ben Jonson, of course, came from a background that was if anything more
humble than Shakespeare's originally, yet had an extensive library of
his own, and there are references (after Shakespeare's death) to a
"library" room in New Place, which would certainly also have been there
when he was alive.  The fact that we cannot identify the books that were
in Shakespeare's library is certainly no indication that he had no
books, and anybody who believes otherwise should immediately locate the
books belonging to every single well-known Elizabethan and Jacobean
writer to prove their case.  Obviously Bill Godshalk is not making this
erroneous assumption, but some of our less enlightened brethren do make
this judgement.  It would be interesting to see how many of *their*
books can be identified four hundred years after their death (there is
virtually no chance, at present, that any of my library of thousands of
books will be traceable back to me, for example - simply because I do
not mark my books, and they will very rapidly be absorbed by second-hand
bookshops and by distant relatives who will probably never have heard of
me, in the decades after my death).

Thomas Larque.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           R. A. Cantrell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 10 Dec 2003 10:29:19 -0600
Subject: 14.2319 Shakespeare's Library
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2319 Shakespeare's Library

This is a select bibliography of work that has considered the matter
from one or another vantage.

Anders, H.D.R. Shakespeare's Books. 1900. New York: AMS Press, 1965.

Bullough, Geoffrey. Narrative and Dramatic Sources of Shakespeare. 8
vols. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1957.

Guttman, Selma. The Foreign Sources of Shakespeare's Works: An Annotated
Bibliography of the Commentary Written on This Subject between 1904 and
1940 Together With Lists of Certain Translations Available to
Shakespeare. New York: King


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