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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: November ::
Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2145  Friday, 7 November 2003

[1]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Thursday, 6 Nov 2003 16:41:20 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2133 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge

[2]     From:   Bill Arnold <
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        Date:   Thursday, 6 Nov 2003 12:07:41 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2133 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Thursday, 6 Nov 2003 16:41:20 -0000
Subject: 14.2133 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2133 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge

>HUGH LLOYD Are you a doctor, then?
>ANTONY HANCOCK Well, I never really bothered.
>
>Dr Gabriel Egan

Can you play the violin?

Dunno -- I never tried.

RH

(I think the violin version predates Tony Hancock.)

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Arnold <
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Date:           Thursday, 6 Nov 2003 12:07:41 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 14.2133 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2133 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge

Gabriel Egan writes, "Some PhD candidates take no courses at all and
some take more than this. But the PhD [sic] isn't awarded for the
learning of stuff that's already known but for the creation of new
knowledge by thousands of hours of research."

OK: what are we saying here?  I hope you are *not* dismissing that Ph.D
candidates in America, as far as I know, must fulfill 60-grad hours of
courses in their field of endeavor.  In my case at UMass-Amherst in the
1960's that was the requirement.  Those courses usually demanded
scholarly papers with 30+ pages, with footnotes and Works Cited, based
of original research: that was more than a dozen, as I recall.  And I
had to pass a foreign language reading exam: French, my choice.  And I
had to complete a 12-hour dissertation, with ample hours of research,
which resulted in a novel inasmuch as the MFA I sought was in Creative
Writing.  So, I would venture to say: I personally do *not* know of
anyone who can get a Ph.D based solely on a thesis presentation.  Oh,
yes, I also had to pass an Oral Exam with three professors in defense of
my thesis presentation.  Oh, yes, I am basically restricting these
remarks to the broad field of English.

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

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