2003

King Lear: Looking for Advice on Editing and Setting

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2135  Thursday, 6 November 2003

[1]     From:   Cornelius Novelli <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 05 Nov 2003 12:08:53 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2122 King Lear: Looking for Advice on Editing and
Setting

[2]     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 5 Nov 2003 13:01:20 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 14.2122 King Lear: Looking for Advice on Editing and Setting


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cornelius Novelli <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 05 Nov 2003 12:08:53 -0500
Subject: 14.2122 King Lear: Looking for Advice on Editing and
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2122 King Lear: Looking for Advice on Editing and
Setting

Alan -- What Lamb said may have been true for his time and its
production practices.   Lamb is always interesting, but I've seen so
many wonderful, engaging productions of KING LEAR that I don't give much
practical weight to his words.

The play is filled with immediate, down-to-earth interactions between
parents, children, siblings, mates.  That I think is the source of its
power, and what makes it so accessible.

The Grand Theatre's ongoing project sounds wonderful!

I once had to edit KING LEAR for an audio version.  If I can find the
script I'll let you know and you can let me know where to mail it.

Neil Novelli
Le Moyne College

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 5 Nov 2003 13:01:20 -0500
Subject: King Lear: Looking for Advice on Editing and
Comment:        SHK 14.2122 King Lear: Looking for Advice on Editing and
Setting

Any attempt to make King Lear 'palatable and entertaining to middle and
high school audiences' must be absurd in principle. To set such a
production in the 'Old West' can only be ludicrous in practice. The
suggestion that 'passion and dedication' might be expended in pursuit of
such aims confirms that the whole project is a hoax.  Alan J. Sanders
(President, Pumphouse Players indeed!) should own up. You are really
Bill Arnold. Admit it.

Terence Hawkes

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Olivier's Henry V Dedication

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2134  Thursday, 6 November 2003

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 5 Nov 2003 14:45:04 -0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.2117 Olivier's Henry V Dedication

[2]     From:   Edna Z. Boris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 6 Nov 2003 08:22:14 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2117 Olivier's Henry V Dedication


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 5 Nov 2003 14:45:04 -0800
Subject: 14.2117 Olivier's Henry V Dedication
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.2117 Olivier's Henry V Dedication

This now has me confused.  I remember a dedication to airborne units and
commandos, but was there a separate dedication to the RAF?  Or is it
just too easy to confuse "airborne forces" with "Air Force"?

Yours truly,
Sean Lawrence.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edna Z. Boris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 6 Nov 2003 08:22:14 -0500
Subject: 14.2117 Olivier's Henry V Dedication
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2117 Olivier's Henry V Dedication

Many thanks for the quick and informative responses about Olivier's
Henry V dedication.  It's comforting to have a reality check confirmed
from time to time.

Edna Boris

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Jonson's Volpone and Middleton's Chaste Maid in

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2132  Thursday, 6 November 2003

From:           Mary McNally <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 05 Nov 2003 12:44:16 +0000
Subject:        Jonson's Volpone and Middleton's Chaste Maid in Cheapside

I wonder if anyone can help us here to find filmed versions (TV or
theatre) of Jonson's Volpone and Middleton's Chaste Maid in Cheapside.
All suggestions, ideas gratefully received!

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2133  Thursday, 6 November 2003

From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 6 Nov 2003 11:40:11 -0000
Subject: 14.2118 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2118 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge

I stopped reading this thread some time ago, but before deleting the
latest posting something caught my eye.

Bill Arnold wrote

>Hey: just because in one sentence I state I wear a
>hat on occasion of a journalist and a tabloid author
>does not mean that I suddenly give up my *crown*
>as 60-hour graduate of the UMass-Amherst MFA
>program.  Unless I am mistaken, those 60 hours of
>graduate courses are no more and no less than *any*
>Ph.D wades through on his way to Dr. X.

Some PhD candidates take no courses at all and some take more than this.
But the PhD isn't awarded for the learning of stuff that's already known
but for the creation of new knowledge by thousands of hours of research.

Bill Arnold went on

>Not that I call myself a *Doctor* which I do not,
>but I am entitled to the monniker of *Master* in the
>largest sense, and accept that! . . . I do not drop my
>role as a *scholar*.

In the episode called The Blood Donor (first broadcast on BBC television
23 June 1961) Antony Hancock explains to Hugh Lloyd that blood travels
right round the body, starting at the heart and returning there, thus
giving the heart and the blood vessels something useful to do:

HUGH LLOYD Are you a doctor, then?
ANTONY HANCOCK Well, I never really bothered.

Dr Gabriel Egan

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Play structure; prologues, & epilogues

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2131  Thursday, 6 November 2003

From:           Thomas M. Lahey <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 5 Nov 2003 12:36:02 -0800
Subject:        Play structure; prologues, & epilogues

Hi,

I'm hoping someone (s?) has this knowledge at their fingertips including
if there are no conventions, i.e., playwrights can do whatever they
want.  In particular:

1)  A play has so many acts (Macbeth:  5).
2)  An Act has so many scenes (Lear, Act 5 has 3 Scenes).
3)  A Play can have a Prologue; acts like Act 0, but there is only the
one "scene" (Troilus & Cressida has an actor play the Prologue; in Romeo
& Juliet it's the Chorus).
4)  A Play can have an Induction (Taming of the Shrew), acts like Act 0,
can have Scenes.
5)  A play can have an Epilogue following the last act, but there is
only the one "scene" (As You Like It).

Q1)  Anyone aware of a reference for the rules/conventions for
structuring a play.

Q2)  OED (Encyclopedic) definition allows a Prologue before any act.
Are there plays with a Prologue before any act but 1?

Q3)  Any plays with a Prologue and an Induction?

Q4)  Any other thoughts?

Thanks,
Tom

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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