2003

A Looking Glasse for London

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2175  Thursday, 13 November 2003

[1]     From:   Michael McClintock <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 12 Nov 2003 12:39:31 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2167 A Looking Glasse for London

[2]     From:   Nicholas Ranson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 12 Nov 2003 18:45:35 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2167 A Looking Glasse for London

[3]     From:   David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 12 Nov 2003 23:44:41 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2167 A Looking Glasse for London


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael McClintock <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 12 Nov 2003 12:39:31 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 14.2167 A Looking Glasse for London
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2167 A Looking Glasse for London

There is a brief discussion and a full listing of the markings in the
fourth quarto of Looking Glasse for London in the Malone Society edition
of the play (1932), xxviii-xxxiii. This edition also includes 3
facsimile pages from the quarto.

Michael McClintock
McKendree College

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nicholas Ranson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 12 Nov 2003 18:45:35 -0500
Subject: 14.2167 A Looking Glasse for London
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2167 A Looking Glasse for London

Both Hayashi (1970) and Clugston (1980) have editions of a Looking
Glasse. J. S. Dean's Bibliography of Greene material is still a good
source.

Cheers,
Nick Ranson.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 12 Nov 2003 23:44:41 -0600
Subject: 14.2167 A Looking Glasse for London
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2167 A Looking Glasse for London

Holger Scott wrote:

>I've just stumbled across an article by Charles Read Baskervill from
>1932, describing the single surviving copy of Q4 of Lodge and Greene's
>_A Looking Glasse for London and England_, which seems to have been used
>as a prompt-book (or at any rate, to make William Long happier, as some
>sort of playhouse text) -- it has numerous annotations in an early
>17th-century hand. As far as I know, this document has not been
>discussed anywhere else (with the exception of a piece on its printing
>history by Laurie Maguire in _Studies in Bibliography_). Baskervill's
>article is listed in the bibliography of Kastan and Cox's _New History_,
>but not cited anywhere in the text as far as I can make out. At the same
>time, this strikes me as a pretty exciting and important source -- to
>the best of my knowledge, we don't really have anything like it anywhere
>else. I haven't done an exhaustive search, but certainly neither the MLA
>nor the WSB brought up anything. Do any of you know if anyone has worked
>on this since the 1930s?

W. W. Greg discussed this copy and the annotations on pp. xxviii-xxxiii
of his 1932 Malone Society reprint of Q1 of the play, and he also
described it on pp. 199-200 of vol. 1 of A Bibliography of the English
Printed Drama to the Restoration (1939), citing Baskervill's article and
his own edition of Q1.  There had earlier been a Tudor Fascimile Texts
edition of Q2 of A Looking Glasse published in 1914 by John Farmer, but
I don't believe he knew about the annotated copy of Q4.

There have been two modern editions of the play: one edited by Tetsumaro
Hayashi and published in 1970 by Scarecrow Press (an abridgement of a
Kent State University thesis), and one edited by George Alan Clugston
and published in 1980 by Garland (a straight reprint of a University of
Michigan thesis).  I don't have either of these volumes at hand, so I
can't report exactly what they say about the annotated Q4 of the play,
but I'm guessing they must at least mention it.

The reference to Baskervill's article in Cox and Kastan's New History is
on pp. 495-6, in note 4 of Paul Werstine's article on "Plays in
Manuscript".  Werstine's note also mentions the two other known quartos
with manuscript theatrical annotations: the British Library copy of
Edward Sharpham's The Fleire (1607), discussed by Clifford Leech in
Review of English Studies 11 (1935), 70-74, and by C. G.  Peter in his
1986 edition of Sharpham, published by Garland; and the Folger copy of
The Two Merry Milke-Maids (1620), discussed by Leslie Thomson in "A
Quarto 'Marked for Performance': Evidence of What?", Medieval and
Renaissance Drama in England 8 (1996), 176-210.  William Long noted the
annotated Looking Glasse and Two Merry Milke-Maids quartos (but not the
Fleire one) in "Bookkeepers and Playhouse Manuscripts: A Peek at the
Evidence", Shakespeare Newsletter 44 (1994), 3.

Dave Kathman
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Malone's Apothecary

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2174  Thursday, 13 November 2003

From:           Ivan Lupic <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 13 Nov 2003 15:55:30 +0100
Subject:        Malone's Apothecary

Dear all,

I'm puzzled by plate 6 in Katherine Duncan-Jones's edition of the
Sonnets (Arden Shakespeare, 1997; repr. 2001). The drawings and the text
I'm curious about appear on pp. 76-7. The note informs the reader that
the drawings are 'inscribed on the verso of the first flyleaf of
SHAKE-SPEARES SONNETS (1609)', a book which was once in the possession
of Edmond Malone and is now, I presume, in Bibliotheca Bodleiana,
Oxford. I am puzzled by Malone's note and would greatly appreciate any
clarification.

Malone writes, as far as I can decipher from the photograph, the
following: 'Mr Steevens borrowed this volume from me in 1779, to peruse
the Rape of Lucrece in the original edition, of which he was not
possessed. When he returned it, he made this drawing. I was then
confined by a sore throat, and attended by Mr Atkinson the Apothecary,
of whom the above figure whom Shakspeare addresses, is a caricature.'

The things I find confusing are as follows:

1) How could Steevens have read Lucrece (and 'in the original edition'
at that) in the 1609 volume, which prints only the sonnets and A Lover's
Complaint?

2) Why would Malone write what he does above Steevens's drawing of
Shakespeare, namely: 'If thou could'st, Doctor, cast the water of my
sonnets, find their disease, or purge my editor till he understood them,
I would applaud thee &c'? That is, why would he mention the sonnets
above the drawing and Lucrece below it?

Hoping that I'm not missing some important point,
Ivan Lupic

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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Two Renaissance Graduate Fellowships

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2172  Thursday, 13 November 2003

From:           Gary L. Taylor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 12 Nov 2003 14:22:00 -0500
Subject:        Two Renaissance Graduate Fellowships

$20,000 fellowships for graduate students, at the M.A. or Ph.D. level,
at the  Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance Studies,  including:

1. A new Strode fellowship set aside for minority candidates. We are
particularly seeking a student who would be interested in combining  the
Strode Program's focus on Renaissance literature with the issues
addressed  by the English Department's "Signs of Race" series, described
at
http://www.as.ua.edu/english/symposium/series.htm

2.  Editorial/Book History Fellowship: One Strode fellowship has been
set aside for a student with computer expertise who is interested in
issues related to the history of the book and editorial theory/practice.
This candidate would be involved in a new, web-based Renaissance
editorial project. For an example of an editorial project associated
with the Strode Program, see the description of The Collected Works of
Thomas Middleton at
http://www.as.ua.edu/english/strode/middleton/intro1.htm

For more information on the Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance
Studies--including samples of recent publications by Strode faculty
Celia Daileader, Sharon O'Dair, Mathew Winston, and Gary Taylor--you can
go to http://www.as.ua.edu/english/strode/middleton/intro1.htm

And for those who know nothing about Alabama or Tuscaloosa as a place to
live, work, and think, you can go to
http://bama.ua.edu/%7Ewriting/main_html/tuscaloosa.htm

Please pass this information to any students in your program, or faculty
at your university, that you think might be interested.

Prof. Gary Taylor
Director, Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance Literature
General Editor, The Oxford Middleton
www.as.ua.edu/english/strode/middleton/intro1.htm

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Dramatis personae

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2173  Thursday, 13 November 2003

From:           David Friedberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, November 12, 2003 4:58 PM
Subject:        Dramatis personae

The Folio of 1623 does not give a list of Dramatis Personae for Hamlet,
but my copy of the Oxford Shakespeare does.  It lists the Ghost as of
Hamlet's father.

I am not at all certain that this ghost is that of Hamlet's father.  Can
anyone tell me when did a list of characters appearing in the play
become the norm?

Has the Ghost always been definitively described as Hamlet's father?

David Friedberg

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

King Lear: Looking for Advice on Editing and Setting

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2171  Wednesday, 12 November 2003

From:           David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 11 Nov 2003 17:44:20 -0500
Subject: 14.2155 King Lear: Looking for Advice on Editing and
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2155 King Lear: Looking for Advice on Editing and
Setting

A Ponderosa Ranch version of *Lear* was performed at Stratford, Ont., in
the late 70s or early 80s, with Douglas Campbell as the rancher-king,
and everybody speaking with prairie accents.  I didn't find it very
satisfying, but my unhappiness had more to do with the actors than the
setting.

David Evett

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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