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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: October ::
Now God stand up for bastards
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1908  Wednesday, 1 October 2003

[1]     From:   Jack Heller <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Sep 2003 07:57:51 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1894 Now God stand up for bastards

[2]     From:   C. David Frankel <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Sep 2003 09:03:05 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.1874 Now God stand up for bastards

[3]     From:   HR Greenberg <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Sep 2003 10:00:22 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1894 Now God stand up for bastards


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Heller <
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Date:           Tuesday, 30 Sep 2003 07:57:51 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 14.1894 Now God stand up for bastards
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1894 Now God stand up for bastards

In the list of bastards, it occurs to me that we have excluded a person
whose legitimacy both as heir and monarch was contested: Elizabeth I.
And she does appear in drama, though in plays that would have defended
her legitimacy, especially Heywood's If You Know Not Me plays (based
largely on John Foxe's Acts and Monuments).

Jack Heller
Huntington College

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           C. David Frankel <
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Date:           Tuesday, 30 Sep 2003 09:03:05 -0400
Subject: 14.1874 Now God stand up for bastards
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.1874 Now God stand up for bastards

Thanks for the replies.  I was prompted to the question from reading an
article about The Revenger's Tragedy, which makes much of Spurio's
bastardy and comments that the allegorical nature of the bastard was
pretty much a constant in the writing of the time -- and since
Faulkenbridge seems to be pretty much the only "good" bastard that comes
to mind (Brutus is, I think, a problematic possibility), I'll go under
the assumption that this notion holds water.

cdf

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           HR Greenberg <
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Date:           Tuesday, 30 Sep 2003 10:00:22 EDT
Subject: 14.1894 Now God stand up for bastards
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1894 Now God stand up for bastards

In the two productions of King John I've seen, Falconbridge has been
played either as a patriot, or a Machiavellian schemer with ambiguous
feelings about "goodness".

I think the character is ambiguous, and subject hence to multiple
readings.

All too the good, I would say. HR Greenberg

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