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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: October ::
Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1959  Wednesday, 8 October 2003

[1]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 07 Oct 2003 11:35:42 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1949 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge

[2]     From:   Clifford Stetner <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Oct 2003 11:58:04 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1949 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge

[3]     From:   Marcia Eppich-Harris <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Oct 2003 17:18:41 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1949 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge

[4]     From:   David Evett <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Oct 2003 21:29:59 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1949 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Tuesday, 07 Oct 2003 11:35:42 -0400
Subject: 14.1949 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1949 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge

>"Othello" is your encyclopedia for this effect, and several variations
>on it.

I agree.  In fact, in my musings on the 26/27 monosyllables in Hamlet's
"How all occasions" soliloquy it occurred to me that Othello is the
anti-Hamlet.  Hamlet has cause in fact and does nothing; Othello only
thinks he has cause and does too much.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <
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Date:           Tuesday, 7 Oct 2003 11:58:04 -0400
Subject: 14.1949 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1949 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge

>I've not come on the idea of "Gettier cases" before - sounds
>interesting.
>
>Robin Hamilton

See the short piece: Gettier, Edmund L. "Is Justified True Belief
Knowledge?" Analyis 23 (1963) 121-3. Or if you like, I can scan it and
email it to you.

"More lights!" Weren't these Goethe's last words? Maybe he killed
Hamlet.

Clifford Stetner
CUNY
http://phoenixandturtle.net

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcia Eppich-Harris <
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Date:           Tuesday, 7 Oct 2003 17:18:41 -0500
Subject: 14.1949 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1949 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge

>These involve scenarios in which it does not seem that the
>subject has knowledge even though he or she does have a justified true
>belief.  [...]
>I have a true
>belief for which I have (seemingly) good reasons yet this does not
>amount to knowledge.

Seems to me that the most obvious example of this is when Romeo
believes, justifiably, that Juliet is dead, but she's not.

Cheers,
Marcia Eppich-Harris

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <
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Date:           Tuesday, 7 Oct 2003 21:29:59 -0400
Subject: 14.1949 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1949 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge

The ending of *Rom* produces what is, I guess, a kind of variant on the
Gettier case.  Romeo has very good reason to suppose that Juliet is
dead; he's heard it from his servant while still in Mantua, he's had
that information seconded by his meeting with Paris, come to place
flowers at her grave, and then by his own observation of her body on her
bier.  His response to kill himself.  She is not dead, of course, and
yet, in a way, she is--cut off by death from all she cares about she has
no desire nor will to live further, and makes what Gettier calls "a true
belief" turn into what he calls "knowledge," for us in the audience at
least.

David Evett

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