Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: October ::
Olivia=I, Viola
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2073  Monday, 27 October 2003

[1]     From:   Steve Sohmer <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Oct 2003 09:29:11 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2053 Olivia=I, Viola

[2]     From:   D Bloom <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Oct 2003 13:18:42 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.2053 Olivia=I, Viola

[3]     From:   Clifford Stetner <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 23 Oct 2003 13:17:21 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.2053 Olivia=I, Viola


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Sohmer <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 22 Oct 2003 09:29:11 EDT
Subject: 14.2053 Olivia=I, Viola
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.2053 Olivia=I, Viola

There's good reason to be wary about imputing anagrammatism to
Shakespeare ... even though Fortinbras is (importantly) anagrammatic for
A First Born. But in Twelfth Night, the text is genuinely rife with
complex wordplays, including anagrams. The play was written for
performance before Queen Elizabeth, who had stuck her country with the
scientifically discredited Julian calendar and also loved playing with
words. She must have been delighted when Andrew said to Feste,

        In sooth, thou wast in very gracious fooling last night, when thou
spok'st of Pigrogromitus, of the Vapians passing the equinoctial of
Queubus. 'Twas very good, i'faith (2.3.20-3).

Andrew's phrases "gracious fooling" and "in faith" signal the subtext.
"Pigrogromitus" could be a corruption of Regiomontanus, for which it is
very nearly an anagram. This was the assumed name of the mathematician
Johann M

 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.