2003

Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2010  Wednesday, 15 October 2003

From:           Daniel O'Brien <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Oct 2003 09:53:03 +0000
Subject: 14.1981 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1981 Shakespeare and the Theory of Knowledge

Thanks, Dave.

The Wilde example seems spot on.

Dan

>I can't think of an unqualified Gettier case in Shakespeare, but isn't
>Oscar Wilde's entire play, "The Importance of Being Earnest," built
>around such a case of a true knowledge based on a false observation? In
>the first scene, Algernon produces a cigarette case inscribed to "Jack"
>and insists it cannot belong to his friend Ernest. When his friend
>replies that his name isn't Ernest at all, but Jack, Algernon produces a
>list of evidence to "prove" that his friend's name is, in fact, Ernest:
>"You have always told me it was Ernest. I have introduced you to
>everyone as Ernest. You look as if your name was Ernest. Your are the
>most earnest-looking person I ever saw in my life. It is perfectly
>absurd your saying that your name isn't Ernest.  It's on your cards.
>Here is one of them. 'Mr Ernest Worthing, B.4, The Albany.' I'll keep
>this as a proof that your name is Ernest if ever you attempt to deny it
>to me, or to Gwendolen, or to anyone else."
>
>It is only at the end of the play that the birth tokens reveal that Jack
>is, indeed, Ernest. Yet all the evidence that Algernon cites is
>hilariously beside the point.

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Apologies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2009  Wednesday, 15 October 2003

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, October 15, 2003
Subject:        Apologies

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

I really should not get on a computer when I am feeling under the
weather. Once yesterday and then again once today I send to the complete
list what I should have sent to the listserv.

Sorry,
Hardy

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Archbishop in Henry V

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2007  Wednesday, 15 October 2003

From:           Jacob Goldberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Oct 2003 02:58:15 EDT
Subject: 14.1994 Archbishop in Henry V
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1994 Archbishop in Henry V

Try Isaac Asimov's Guide To Shakespeare, Vol.4 (The English Plays),
pages 453ff.

Jacob Goldberg

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Shakespearean Gardens

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2008  Wednesday, 15 October 2003

[1]     From:   Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Oct 2003 00:35:23 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1997 Shakespearean Gardens

[2]     From:   Susanne Collier-Lakeman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Oct 2003 15:23:52 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1997 Shakespearean Gardens


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Oct 2003 00:35:23 -0700
Subject: 14.1997 Shakespearean Gardens
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1997 Shakespearean Gardens

>San Francisco's Golden Gate Park was established in 1870. I
>don't know when the Shakespeare Garden there was first planted.

The Shakespeare Garden was begun in 1928.  It's mainly a rectangular
lawn with a border of about 150 plants, enclosed in a hedge.  It's nice,
modest, private; bring a book.

>The Huntington Botanical Gardens were started on the
>Huntington estate in Pasadena, California around 1903.

The Huntington has a lot more money than Golden Gate Park, and is far
nicer.

>The Shakespeare garden in New York's Central Park was also
>created in 1916.

But it was a wreck decades later and was completely reconstructed in
1987.  Details:
http://www.centralparknyc.org/virtualpark/thegreatlawn/shakespearegarden/

Cheers,
Al Magary

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susanne Collier-Lakeman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Oct 2003 15:23:52 -0700
Subject: 14.1997 Shakespearean Gardens
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1997 Shakespearean Gardens

Well, there is "Perdita's Garden" which is parodied in E.F.  Benson's
Queen Lucia in the front garden of Lucia's Elizabethan house in the
Cotswolds. That is from the 1920s.  If a self-conscientiously
"intertextual" writer like Benson made a parody of a Shakespeare garden
in the 20s, one imagines they'd been around for quite a while.

Herbaciously yours,
Susanne Collier
California State University, Northridge

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Romeo and Juliet in Paddington Bear

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.2006  Wednesday, 15 October 2003

[1]     From:   Janet Costa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Oct 2003 07:56:51 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1992 Romeo and Juliet in Paddington Bear

[2]     From:   Kevin De Ornellas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Oct 2003 21:54:14 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1992 Romeo and Juliet in Paddington Bear


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Janet Costa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Oct 2003 07:56:51 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 14.1992 Romeo and Juliet in Paddington Bear
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1992 Romeo and Juliet in Paddington Bear

Richard Burt wrote: "This disastrous turn of events also produces more
laughter in the audience and reassures the director."

There was a similar instance in the PBS children's program, "Between the
Lions," which was broadcast in Spring 2001. There was a poetry day at
the library, and a chicken was cast as Juliet. Funny stuff.

Any comments on the new Nextel commercial?

Janet

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kevin De Ornellas <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Oct 2003 21:54:14 +0000
Subject: 14.1992 Romeo and Juliet in Paddington Bear
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1992 Romeo and Juliet in Paddington Bear

>In an episode of the Canadian animated cartoon Paddington Bear (airing
>on HBO October 9, 2003), Paddington is cast as the Friar (just three
>lines in this production, according to the director)and is also put in
>charge of sound effects for a production of Romeo and Juliet,

There is a tradition of the Paddington Bear/Shakespeare crossover.  The
1981 UK series was narrated by that splendid Shakespearean actor,
Michael Hordern.  In one episode, Paddington somehow ends up as a prompt
for a great actor who is on stage reciting Shakespearean speeches
(rather in the style of John 'Ages of Man' Gielgud).  Paddington has to
help the actor out - the actor can't remember the end of the clause, 'To
be, or ...'.  The Peruvian, marmalade-loving mammal comes to the rescue.

Kevin De Ornellas
Queen's University, Belfast

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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