2003

Romeo and Juliet in Paddington Bear

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1992  Monday, 13 October 2003

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 10 Oct 2003 17:42:53 -0400
Subject:        Romeo and Juliet in Paddington Bear

In an episode of the Canadian animated cartoon Paddington Bear (airing
on HBO october 9, 2003), Paddington is cast as the Friar (just three
lines in this production, according to the director)and is also put in
charge of sound effects for a production of Romeo and Juliet, "the
greatest play in the world," in a park. During the rehearsal, the guy
playing Romeo becomes klutzy whenever he gets close to Dierdre, the
woman playing Juliet, whom he likes. He keeps falling out of character
and addres Dierdre by her name rather than as Juliet, and he embarrasses
himself by stepping on her foot while dancing during a rehearsal of the
holy pilgrim / sonnet exchange in the Capulet ball scene.  Later, just
before the performance, they knock heads as they both go to pick up some
papers he drops when she gives them to him.  The director comes in and
freaks out at him ("What have you done?"), and he walks off thinking he
can't go forward with the play.  Paddington, who earlier had seen
Dierdre say that the guy is her Romeo, whispers this info in his ear,
and so the guy goes back to perform his role. During the balcony scene
(the only part of the performance we see), he forgets his lines. The
director is having a heart attack, but Paddington, who had produced as
the friar when his skull cap wig accidentally fell off after he bowed on
stage just before his exit, goes out on stage to produce more disruptive
sounds. And after climbing a ladder up to Juliet, "Romeo" falls and
pulls her down with him.  This disastrous turn of events also produces
more laughter in the audience and reassures the director.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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Improvised Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1991  Monday, 13 October 2003

From:           Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 10 Oct 2003 13:44:38 -0700
Subject:        Improvised Shakespeare

News from the far side of the world:

BEST OF THE BARD

New Zealand Herald (Auckland), October 11, 2003

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/entertainment/entertainmentstorydisplay.cfm?storyID=3528170&thesection=entertainment&thesubsection=general&thesecondsubsection

A Bard's Tale is Shakespeare off the cuff.  Improv actors were asked
"what if Shakespeare, the world's most famous playwright, were alive
today--what kind of plays would he write?" It's iambic pentameter
crossed with "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" and it's on at the Covert
Theatre tonight.

The eight-strong cast, including James McLaughlin, Mark Scott and T.M.
Bishop, will ask the audience for a title of a play and then perform it
live. They promise "romance, mixed identities, regicide, true love,
spirits and magical spells".
---

Auckland's Covert Theatre is devoted to improvisation and sketch
comedy.  http://www.coverttheatre.com/  "Who's Line Is It Anyway?" is an
improv show born in Britain, occasionally aired in the U.S.
http://www.geocities.com/Hollywood/Lot/8451/show.html
---

I googled on Shakespeare improvisation and came up with some interesting
links, one of which led me back to Sh. on improvisation:

This fellow is wise enough to play the fool;
And to do that well craves a kind of wit:
He must observe their mood on whom he jests,
The quality of persons, and the time,
And, like the haggard, check at every feather
That comes before his eye. This is a practice
As full of labor as a wise man's art:
For folly that he wisely shows is fit;
But wise men, folly-fall'n, quite taint their wit.

-- Viola, Act III, Scene 1, Twelfth Night (Cambridge text)

Cheers,
Al Magary

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
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editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1989  Monday, 13 October 2003

[1]     From:   Stan Kozikowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 10 Oct 2003 09:24:55 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1972 Hamlet

[2]     From:   D Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 10 Oct 2003 13:18:53 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.1982 Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stan Kozikowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 10 Oct 2003 09:24:55 -0400
Subject: 14.1972 Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1972 Hamlet

I've read somewhere (might anyone know the source?) that 'Fortinbras'
('One who is of strong arm') may be an allusion to a(nick)name (pun
intended) given to  King James VI when he personally thwarted the young
earl of Gowrie from stabbing him to death during a visit to the Gowrie
estate in 1600.  The  matter was printed up in a special pamphlet that
WS  may well have read and/since published by V. Simmes, the fellow who
gave us Q!1 Hamlet.

Stan Kozikowski

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           D Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 10 Oct 2003 13:18:53 -0500
Subject: 14.1982 Hamlet
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.1982 Hamlet

Oh, lord. Here we go again. I'll take John's point first.

Thus saith Horatio:

. Our last king,
Whose image even but now appear'd to us,
Was, as you know, by Fortinbras of Norway,
Thereto prick'd on by a most emulate pride,
Dared to the combat; in which our valiant Hamlet--
For so this side of our known world esteem'd him--
Did slay this Fortinbras; who by a seal'd compact,
Well ratified by law and heraldry,
Did forfeit, with his life, all those his lands
Which he stood seized of, to the conqueror:
Against the which, a moiety competent
Was gaged by our king; which had return'd
To the inheritance of Fortinbras,
Had he been vanquisher; as, by the same covenant,
And carriage of the article design'd,
His fell to Hamlet.

Horatio might be wrong. Or I might be misreading him. But until
otherwise persuaded I stand by my previous summary (except I would add a
"seem to have" between "They" and "had"):

>Old Hamlet didn't do anything in particular to Old Fortinbras except
>fight him in a fair trial by combat. They had rival claims to suzerainty
>over Norway (again an indication of a close connection of the two
>families), and they set up a wager to settle the matter -- all of Norway
>against a chunk of Denmark -- with the winner to take all, including
>the life of the loser.

From the brusque way Claudius deals with him, Old Norway appears to be
some sort of tributary, no monarch but a kind of satrap who'd better
follow orders when they're given.

As to Ed Taft's point, the matter is not susceptible of proof, but to
me, Fortinbras's "rights of memory" suggest a kinship claim, irrelevant
until the immediate family of Hamlet is wiped out, but definitive when
it is. "Rights" would thus be a legal claim to something, here an entire
kingdom. "Of memory" may have reference to the legal concept usually
found in "time of memory."

Hamlet's dying prophecy that the election will go to Fortinbras makes
better sense if he has such rights at the outset. If Fortinbras planned
to seize the throne of Denmark by conquest, we might expect Hamlet to
say something about that rather than about the peaceful ratification of
rights of memory. Nor does his "dying voice" in favor of that resolution
make much sense to me unless he believes that to be a good, as well as a
logical and legal, outcome.

I don't particularly enjoy having to defend projective assumptions, but
the remarks of Horatio, Hamlet, and Fortinbras suggest little
alternative. I appeal to Master William of Ockham for judgment

Cheers,
 don

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S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Italian verb: "shakespeareggiare" (shakespearize)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1990  Monday, 13 October 2003

From:           Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 10 Oct 2003 12:28:05 -0700
Subject: 14.1976 Italian verb: "shakespeareggiare"
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1976 Italian verb: "shakespeareggiare"
(shakespearize)

An OT comment that I hope does *not* begin a frazzle (=an instantly
worn-out thread):

Sean Lawrence has apt comments on Gary Taylor's Guardian article.  As a
steady American visitor to various British papers and the BBC since the
Iraq business, I will parallel Sean by saying that British newspaper
opinion columns are longer, more intelligent (even intellectual), more
digressive, sharper, and provocative than all but a handful of American
op-ed writers.  Gary Taylor does wander all over the world from (at
present) Rome, and I'm glad that he does not hold back anything on his
mind.

BTW you can pick up previous Taylor columns, which always manage to
involve Sh., in the Guardian archives:
http://search.guardian.co.uk/search97cgi/s97networkr_cgi?QueryText=%28+%28Gary+Taylor%29+AND+%28VdkPublicationDate+%3E%3D+01%2DSep%2D1998%29%29&ResultColSize=&ResultTemplate=ArchiveHeadline%2Ehts&Collection=&SortSpec=score+Desc&Query=Gary+Taylor&ResultStart=1&ResultCount=10&ResultMaxDocs=1000&Dtv=&remote_address=193%2E122%2E208%2E99&Action=FilterSearch&Filter=FltArchive%2Ehts

or click here:  http://tinyurl.com/qhmf

Al Magary

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

John Orrell (Obituary)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1988  Monday, 13 October 2003

From:           Takashi Kozuka <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 11 Oct 2003 19:32:11 0000
Subject:        John Orrell (Obituary)

The Guardian (Saturday 11 October 2003)
http://www.guardian.co.uk/obituaries/story/0,3604,1060654,00.html

1st paragraph: "John Orrell, who has died aged 68 of melanoma, was chief
academic adviser for the reconstruction of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre
at Bankside, on the river Thames in London. His researches into the
design of the original Elizabethan building made possible what was
arguably the most significant theatre history project of the 20th
century."

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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