2003

Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1972  Thursday, 9 October 2003

[1]     From:   Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 08 Oct 2003 09:50:19 -0400
        Subj:   Hamlet

[2]     From:   Dana Wilson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 8 Oct 2003 08:07:52 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1938 Hamlet

[3]     From:   D Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 8 Oct 2003 12:26:43 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.1956 Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 08 Oct 2003 09:50:19 -0400
Subject:        Hamlet

Jay Feldman tends to agree that Fortinbras's "rites of memory" allude to
revenge, and in particular, Jay sees "those 'rights of memory' as that
of the former landlord and collector of revenues from those properties."

OK. And there's a necessary corollary to all this.  In the end, we see
(and Hamlet sees too) that Hamlet has been nothing more Than
Fortinbras's "factor," a means to achieve the ends of Fortinbras!

If so (and it certainly seems so), what does that say about the ghost?
About Hamlet?

Questions to be asked, as Falstaff might say!

--Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dana Wilson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 8 Oct 2003 08:07:52 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 14.1938 Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1938 Hamlet

Don, et al,

I would suggest that the reason that the play contains internal
inconsistencies is that to each director to impose meaning on the play
thru an act of pathos, namely deciding what goes in and what goes out.
The critics ripped Mel Gibson's Hamlet because of what was left out.
But to me the inconsistencies suggest the author always intended that
each director should make the play his own, by imposing a reading on the
play, and therefore, drawing order out of chaos.   I suppose that at 400
yrs distance we have come to think of shak as a historical monument in
need of preservation and not as a living monument to drama.

D-

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           D Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 8 Oct 2003 12:26:43 -0500
Subject: 14.1956 Hamlet
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.1956 Hamlet

Edmund Taft responds to the question --"What were Fortinbras's 'rights
of memory' of 5.2?" -- with this:

"He's rather indirect isn't he?  There is no mention of kinship ties, so
that seems unlikely. Most likely, Fortinbras means that he sees the
opportunity for bloodless revenge. He remembers what old Hamlet did to
his father, and now he can avenge his father and gain all the land his
father lost ? and more.

"In effect, Fortinbras succeeds where Hamlet fails. And the fact that
Hamlet names him as his successor suggests that Hamlet, in the end,
realizes exactly this fact."

With all due respect, this doesn't seem to me to cover the idea
expressed in either that phrase, or in Hamlet's "dying voice" towards
the election of Fortinbras. It seems evident on the face of it that the
nobility of Denmark will make the decision and that they will make it,
in accordance with Germanic tradition, by electing some male from the
royal family.

I realize, of course, that Fortinbras is on the scene with an army to
back up his claim, but that does not explain "rights of memory." He
wouldn't bother saying that unless the two royal houses were intertwined
-- which would certainly not be unexpected.

Old Hamlet didn't do anything in particular to Old Fortinbras except
fight him in a fair trial by combat. They had rival claims to suzerainty
over Norway (again an indication of a close connection of the two
families), and they set up a wager to settle the matter -- all of Norway
against a chunk of Denmark -- with the winner to take all, including the
life of the loser.

Finally, Fortinbras could not have hoped to hold the much larger and
richer kingdom unless he had more backing than this expeditionary
force.  If he was a usurper he would face much greater difficulties
holding Denmark than Hamlet / Claudius did in holding Norway. If, by
contrast, he was a close cousin, then he could expect to make his claim
("rights of memory") stick.

Cheers,
don

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
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editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Three Positions Open

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1971  Thursday, 9 October 2003

From:           Susan Oldrieve <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 8 Oct 2003 20:12:48 -0400
Subject:        Three Positions Open

The English Department at Baldwin-Wallace College is hoping to fill
three positions for next year.  We are looking for colleagues to teach
in one or more of the following areas: creative writing (fiction
emphasis); non-Western and post-colonial literature; methods of teaching
English (secondary emphasis); linguistics (introductory level); 17th and
18th century British or British/American literature; journalism.

Baldwin-Wallace is located in a pleasant suburb south of Cleveland, and
despite what you might have heard, the Cleveland area is really is a
wonderful place to live--several excellent school districts, reasonable
cost of living, a chain of heavily wooded parklands all around the city
and a national park just to the south, good theatre, excellent health
care facilities, and "the best band in the land."

Promotion and tenure focuses on excellence in teaching, but the school
provides both financial and moral support for scholarship and many
opportunities for faculty development.   We are an equal opportunity
employer.

Please see our advertisement in the MLA Job Information List and urge
students and colleagues who are on the job market to visit our Website
at www.bw.edu

Susan Oldrieve
Professor of English
Baldwin-Wallace College

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
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Italian verb: "shakespeareggiare" (shakespearize)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1969  Thursday, 9 October 2003

From:           Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 8 Oct 2003 13:15:06 -0700
Subject:        Italian verb: "shakespeareggiare" (shakespearize)

Writing in the Guardian, Gary Taylor (the Sh. scholar who has recently
been a steady contributor) comments not altogether positively on the new
wooden O in the Villa Borghese park in Rome--the column is titled
"Welcome to McBard's."  He links this Globe-alization to globalization,
including of both Shakespeare and the English language, but wonders why
there is not a re-created Italian theater in Regent's Park.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/arts/features/story/0,11710,1058137,00.html

The whole column is an interesting read but here is an extract:

"Another such Italian verb is shakespeareggiare. It means, according to
one modern authority (Ludovico Zorzo), 'to represent genuine human
nature, as opposed to conventional patterns and character construction
according to preconceived ideas and moralistic models.'  In this
definition--which derives from the German Romantics, and still echoes in
innumerable classrooms--Shakespearian 'life' is set against barren
neoclassical 'rules.'

"The parallel English verb, to Shakespearise, expresses a less
enthusiastic reading of the local totem's cultural significance.
There's a whiff of the ridiculous about the word itself, incongruously
associating an aesthetic effect with an industrial one (like magnetise,
vulcanise, oxidise). It was apparently first used in 1836 by the
American transcendentalist Ralph Waldo Emerson, who complained that 'the
English dramatic poets have Shakespearised now for two hundred years.'
In other words, Shakespearise means 'imitate a conventional pattern.'

"Whether a working replica of the Globe constitutes an example of
positive shakespeareggiando or negative Shakespearising depends on where
you are standing, geographically and linguistically..."

Conveyed by Al Magary

PS--I deny that I am a native Californian; in fact, I have never heard
of the place.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

If at home, sir

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1970  Thursday, 9 October 2003

From:           David Cohen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 8 Oct 2003 16:56:34 -0500
Subject:        If at home, sir

I would appreciate any help on the matter of the first line of
Polixenes' response to Leontes' question about how he feels about his
son ("If at home, sir"), as follows:

LEONTES
                . . . . My brother,
        Are you so fond of your young prince as we
        Do seem to be of ours?
POLIXENES
        If at home, sir,
        He's all my exercise, my mirth, my matter . . . .

        The Winter's Tale, Act 1, scene 2, 163-167.

It's that "if at home, sir," that I never thought about till I thought
about the contrast between his sentimental reply to his notoriously
cruel reaction to discovering Florizel's intention to marry Perdita, as
in:

POLIXENES
        Mark your divorce, young sir,
        [Discovering himself]
        Whom son I dare not call; thou art too base
        To be acknowledged: thou a sceptre's heir,
        That thus affect'st a sheep-hook!
        [To Perdita's old father] Thou old traitor,
        I am sorry that by hanging thee I can
        But shorten thy life one week.
        [To Perdita] And thou, fresh piece
        Of excellent witchcraft, who of force must know
        The royal fool thou copest with,--
SHEPHERD
         O, my heart!
POLIXENES
        I'll have thy beauty scratch'd with briers, and made
        More homely than thy state. For thee, fond boy,
        If I may ever know thou dost but sigh
        That thou no more shalt see this knack, as never
        I mean thou shalt, we'll bar thee from succession;
        Not hold thee of our blood, no, not our kin . . .

        The Winter's Tale, Act 4, scene 4, 427-451

Here is a king, an absolute ruler, suddenly confronting a threat that he
will not have the right to chose for his son a wife of proper station
and from a family with powerful political connections, which is the
usual privilege of a king.  His beloved and normally obedient son proves
wayward to his deepest wishes-wayward Florizel is not "at home," that
is, being obedient to expectations regarding his royal station.

Have I got this right-does his remark serve some dramatic presaging of
his later outburst-or is it a lot simpler, i.e., " "the kid's away a
lot, but I like it when he is home, because . . ." or "I am away a lot,
but when home . . . ?

David Cohen

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare's "first serious critic" revealed by

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1968  Thursday, 9 October 2003

From:           Frank Whigham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 08 Oct 2003 07:40:00 -0500
Subject: 14.1961 Shakespeare's "first serious critic" revealed
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1961 Shakespeare's "first serious critic" revealed
by Stanley Wells in TLS

>Renowned Essex, as he past the streets,
>Woulde vaile his bonnett to an oyster wife,
>And with a kinde of humble congie greete
>The vulgar sorte that did admire his life:
>And now sith he hath spent his livinge breath,
>They will not cease yet to lament his death.
>
> (From an anti-Ralegh poem written between c. 1603-18.

Cf. also Everard Guilpin's Skialethia, entered in the Stationers'
Register 15 Sept 1598, recalled to be burnt 1 and 4 June 1599.

See Satire I, 65ff., generally assumed to be a lift from R2 and to
describe Essex:

For when great Foelix passing through the street,
Vayleth his cap to each one he doth meet,
And when no broome-man that will pray for him,
Shall haue less truage then his bonnets brim,
Who would not thinke him perfect curtesie?
Or the hunny-suckle of humilitie?
The deuill he is as soone: he is the deuill,
Brightly accoustred to bemist his euill.

Frank Whigham

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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