2003

Hamlet

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1905  Tuesday, 30 September 2003

From:           Helen H. Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 30 Sep 2003 00:20:14 -0700
Subject: 14.1888 Hamlet
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.1888 Hamlet

I've often wondered about Ophelia's reply, "My Lord, you know right well
you did."

Why would Hamlet deny giving Ophelia some gifts if they both know that
he did so?

If Hamlet is pretending to have forgotten, yet actually does remember,
is he just trying to drive her crazy?

Helen Gordon

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no spirit dares stir

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1904  Tuesday, 30 September 2003

From:           Bill Arnold <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 2003 06:23:46 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 14.1882 no spirit dares stir
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1882 no spirit dares stir

As noted, Will S as the world's *greatest* dramatist, opened his drama
Hamlet with a *HOOK* as a chilling premise, an intellectual idea posited
with the audience, instilling  in his Elizabethan audience an
*other-worldly* spiritual event which was to be resolved by the
flesh-and-blood actions of characters in the play.

It was Will S who through his *words* invoked "the Saviour." The night
scene which opens Hamlet echoes the night scene in which dawn found
Jesus betrayed by one of his own before the cock crowed--that is, before
the *light* of day.  Will S's audience's appetite was whetted with the
idea that something wass *rotten* in Denmark in *front* of an English
audience steeped in the Bible!  Horatio sets this mood, when he says,
"This bodes some strange eruption to our state."

Horatio had noted that the spirit which dared stir looked "Most like"
the dead King, the father of Hamlet.  Horatio noted that the spirit was
dressed "with that fair and warlike form / In which the majesty of
buried Denmark / Did sometimes march."  And Horatio also noted that the
spirit "frown'd" in the same way, saying, "Such was the very armour he
had on / When he the ambitious Norway combated; / So frown/d he
once...."

Having noted that the spirit which dared stir is *none other than* the
resurrected spirit of the departed father of Hamlet, Horatio then
observes, "A mote it is to trouble the mind's eye."
This is a bold borrowing from the New Testament, and Will S is directing
our attention to the sin of brother-on-brother crime, in the KJV,
Matthew, C 7, V 5, "Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine
own eye; and then thou shalt see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy
brother's eye."

This *dramatic" structural event unfolding in the opening scene of
Hamlet before an Elizabethan audience could have been only presaging a
crime of brother against brother!  And who would be the "Saviour" but
none other than Hamlet, the son of the wrong brother.  For Horatio says,
of the spirit that dares stir, "Let us impart what we have seen to-night
/ Unto young Hamlet; for, upon my life, / This spirit, dumb to us, will
speak to him."

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare news of the day, from Google

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1902  Tuesday, 30 September 2003

From:           Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 2003 17:04:50 -0700
Subject:        Shakespeare news of the day, from Google

News:  Google News has a new news-alert system...you get the idea.  I
thought I'd try it out on Shakespeare to see how he plays from day to
day, and got this roundup.  Subscription info at the bottom.  Cheers, Al
Magary

-----
STAGE Notes: Shakespeare Fest 2004 will take historical direction
Kansas City Star, MO
By ROBERT TRUSSELL. The Heart of America Shakespeare Festival will for
only the second time stage a history play. "Henry IV, Part ...
<http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascitystar/entertainment/books/6851412.htm>

BRUSH Up Your Shakespeare!
WSOCtv.com, NC
London's longest-running comedy, brought to life in 1987 by the Reduced
Shakespeare Company, is the ambitious premise of three actors, working
on a shoestring ...
<http://www.wsoctv.com/gocarolinas/2517120/detail.html>

SCHOLAR reconstructed Shakespeare's Globe
Charlotte Observer, NC
Dr. John Orrell, a historian whose intellectual detective work laid the
groundwork for the 1997 re-creation of Shakespeare's original Globe
Theater, died Sept. ...
<http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/local/6880344.htm>

SHAKESPEARE'S Many Dead Haunt the Living This Halloween
Playbill.com, NY
The Shakespeare canon is littered with corpses, from overambitious
rulers like Macbeth and Julius Ceasar to doomed lovers like Romeo and
Juliet....
<http://www.playbill.com/news/article/81835.html>

SYED Huq comes up with another Shakespeare piece
The Daily Star, Bangladesh
... Huq has also effectively translated Shakespeare's The Tempest.
Unlike Shakespeare's other popular plays, Troilus and Cressida has ...
<http://www.thedailystar.net/2003/09/27/d30927140379.htm>

AT Folger, Shakespeare Fakers Worthy Of the Bard
Washington Post
... have been retouched, books that have been added to, emended or
"repaired," and holy relics of shameless bardolatry - form the core of
the Folger Shakespeare ...
<http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A55244-2003Sep23.html>

SHAKESPEARE and Elizabeth Meet in "Elizabeth Rex," Airing on CBC...
Playbill.com, NY
"Elizabeth Rex," the film about a meeting of Shakespeare and Queen
Elizabeth I, based on the play by late Canadian playwright Timothy
Findley, will air 8 PM (ET ...
<http://www.playbill.com/news/article/81841.html>

SHAKESPEARE visits Boone
The Appalachian Online
by Bill Cutler. The largest-ever American theater tour of Shakespeare's
plays is on its way to Boone. The Shakespeare in American ...
<http://www1.appstate.edu/dept/csil/09-23-03/news/general_2.html>

NEA Takes Shakespeare On The Road
New London Day, CT
New London - Calling New London a "serendipitous starting place" for its
"Shakespeare in American Communities" program, National Endowment of the
...
<http://www.theday.com/eng/web/newstand/re.aspx?reIDx=D38AB206-C6E2-4988-ADBE-F7CCA9126C05>

CATCH up on Colonial heritage
Salisbury Daily Times, MD
Today and Sunday, visitors will be able to sample Eastern Shore life as
it was during Colonial days, complete with performances of Shakespeare;
the 18th ...
<http://www.dailytimesonline.com/news/stories/20030927/opinion/3
38360.html>

This once-a-day News Alert is brought to you by Google News
(BETA)...

----

Create a News Alert:
http://www.google.com/newsalerts

Try Google News:
http://news.google.com/

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Hamnet's Death and That Whole Season

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1903  Tuesday, 30 September 2003

From:           Rolland Banker <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 2003 20:18:12 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Query: Hamnet's Death and That Whole Season

In the spirit of helping and not hitting, I offer as a SHAKSPER-List
friend some thoughts.

Since you included "that whole season" in your query you have left open
the chance for me to give you something on that. Your other questions as
I recall are quite answerable and are at my fingertips somewhere but not
in my grasp at the moment. Anyways, others may answer them first. (And
perhaps your answers are to be found on a search through the SHAKSPER
files).

Here's a quote on some of "that whole season" from "Shakespeare the
Actor and the Purposes of Playing" by Meredith Anne Skura, a thoroughly
enjoyable read about the similarities of Elizabethan and modern actors
being "alike in their narcissism, and [a] daring reading of the sonnets
and plays as the utterance of a man who suffered proudly in the
ambivalence of his creative yet dependent and humiliating relationship
to those who sponsored his art."

In a chapter titled: Player King as Beggar in Great Men's Houses-II, she
discusses The Merry Wives of Windsor and the "season" following the
death of Hamnet.

pg. 139: "In his own smaller world, Falstaff is made scapegoat for
Windsor's jealousies, appetites, and shames. Part of the hilarity of the
last act is the double contrivance whereby Falstaff's punishment becomes
the means of freeing Anne Page to marry her true love, Fenton. In the
poetic logic of the play, Falstaff is killed off three times so that
Anne and Fenton may thrive and renew the world, harmony is restored
among the community's married couples, and the play ends with the
promise of a communal feast.  Finally, perhaps entirely accidentally
interestingly so, given Richard's potentially autobiographical
significance [this is from a comparative link she makes with Richard
III], Falstaff's play, as current opinion has it, was produced on 23
April 1597, Shakespeare's thirty-third (and Christological) birthday.
Years before, Shakespeare's sister Anne had died just before he
celebrated his birthday; the birthday in 1597 would be the first since
his son's and his patron's recent deaths. It would be appropriate
(however accidental), if among the several reversals which the play
effects (between hunter and hunted, cuckold and cuckolder) were one in
which Falstaff, figure for Shakespeare the survivor of his sister,
should now be sacrificed, so that this time young Anne could live
happily ever after."

The chapter presents all kinds of interesting insights into the use of
the name William in that play and others, as "ironically
self-deprecating cameos like Alfred Hitchcock's brief appearences in his
films." And in exploring whether one can locate Shakespeare in Falstaff
in the play or as a young William Page, she sums up the psychoanalytic
exploration of substitution and the replacement children complex with
this thought:

"Slender, one of Anne's would be husbands, sums up the disappointment
such a replacement implies: 'I came yonder at Eton to marry Mistress
Anne Page, and she's a great lubberly boy.' (Wiv 5.5.183-84)

P.S. I have found that the folks at SHAKSPER generally go by the Hotspur
proverb (K.Hen IV part
I.ActIII.1.137-140), please forgive my paraphrase:

"I'll give thrice ... to any well-deserving friend;
But on the way of bargain, mark ye me, I'll cavil on
the ninth part of a hair."

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Doubtful it stood

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1901  Tuesday, 30 September 2003

From:           Graham Hall <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 29 Sep 2003 16:38:18 +0000
Subject:        Doubtful it stood

SHAKSPER is clearly not immune to the curse associated with the naming
of the Scottish Play.  The "M" word is used and two correspondents
translate it as the character and not the play. A third repeats the
previous misuse of "comments" by a fourth alongside the correction of
the latter. All this when the thread in a parallel universe is the
ambiguity of words. Didn't Shakespeare write a play about this sort of
confusion? No, it would have been condemned as an improbable fiction!

Let this pernicious hour stand aye accursed in the calendar.

Best,
Graham Hall

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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