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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: September ::
Wood Controversy
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1742  Friday, 5 September 2003

[1]     From:   Robin Hamilton <
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        Date:   Thursday, 4 Sep 2003 14:44:03 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1736 Wood Controversy

[2]     From:   Graham Hall <
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        Date:   Thursday, 04 Sep 2003 14:04:36 +0000
        Subj:   Blind ? Phew!

[3]     From:   Larry Weiss <
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        Date:   Thursday, 04 Sep 2003 16:16:06 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1736 Wood Controversy


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin Hamilton <
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Date:           Thursday, 4 Sep 2003 14:44:03 +0100
Subject: 14.1736 Wood Controversy
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1736 Wood Controversy

I hesitate to intrude into the titanic clash of fell and opposed
scholars conducted on the choppy seas of rhetorical debate, but there
seems to be a degree of froth around:

<< the question of "pirating and plagiarism" >>

Surely (as Graham Hall initially suggested) these are distinct terms?
"Plagiarism" (loosely) involves the ap or ex propriation of material
which is then passed-off as one's own?  "Piracy", in distinct contrast,
retains the original author's identity as the creator of the work, but
denies the due rewards of this labour.

Appositely enough (as he wrote a history of those gentleman who once
swashed their buckles on the high contested seas) Daniel Defoe is the
first writer recorded as using the term:

1706 De Foe Jure Div. Pref. 42 Gentlemen-Booksellers, that threatned to
Pyrate it, as they call it, viz. Reprint it, and Sell it for half a
Crown.

[OED2(3) PIRATE v. 3 fig. trans. To appropriate or reproduce (the work
or invention of another) without authority, for one's own profit.]

I shall now go meditate the analogical possibilities of "privateering"
applied the WWW -- the distribution of copyright material in electronic
form without the author's consent or any remuneration provided, perhaps?

Pirate Jenny

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Graham Hall <
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Date:           Thursday, 04 Sep 2003 14:04:36 +0000
Subject:        Blind ? Phew!

Mr Larque wrote (14.1714) "[...] blatant pirating of sources [...]" with
regard to Wood's buccaneering enterprises. Hence my caution to him as
Wood has not been engaged in pirating in this instance. (What he does on
his Caribbean holidays is a matter between him and one of his wooden
legs, of course.) I am less certain about the stance of Bob Arnold and
Don Bloom - although I am rather taken by the possibility that all three
respondents are wearing two eye-patches each in respect of the term
"pirating". Their stationery views on the topic seem to be a waste of
license and fail to register.

Perhaps someone else can explain that to them as I am rather busy
researching cases of spontaneous combustion for "The Twitcher" magazine.

I hope this note too might also be categorised as "an almost sensible
response". I get such a Trill when I'm appreciated.

Yours polymorphously,
"Pretty Boy" Hall

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
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Date:           Thursday, 04 Sep 2003 16:16:06 GMT
Subject: 14.1736 Wood Controversy
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1736 Wood Controversy

>Graham Hall writes, "Mr Larque will get even lower marks
>in his essays if he doesn't learn the difference between
>pirating and plagiarism."

Neither I nor any other copyright lawyer I know is aware that there is a
difference.  Pray, what is it?

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