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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: September ::
Re: Tillyard (Again)
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1782  Friday, 12 September 2003

[1]     From:   D Bloom <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 2003 09:37:54 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1768 Re: Tillyard (Again)

[2]     From:   Kathy Dent <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 2003 15:55:45 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1775 Re: Tillyard (Again)

[3]     From:   R. A. Cantrell <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Sep 2003 10:05:08 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1758 Re: Tillyard (Again)


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           D Bloom <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 2003 09:37:54 -0500
Subject: 14.1768 Re: Tillyard (Again)
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1768 Re: Tillyard (Again)

I was afraid from early on that it would not be possible to keep this
sub-topic relevant to the subject of this list, but I mentioned in my
first or second post that my interest had to do with possible Marxist
interpretations of Shakespeare -- which, of course, continue to appear.

I was trying to discover if there was anything I could learn from some
rather polemical comments that some others made. I have always found
Marxism interesting, even if I have never agreed with more than about
twenty per cent of it. Over the years I have found it a very salutary
and useful experience to bump up against ideas, theories, critiques and
such that you disagree with on ideological (that is, emotional) grounds
but that seem highly plausible when clearly stated.

As I don't think we're going to get anywhere, and as it doesn't seem
destined to offer much on the subject at hand, I am content to drop it.

Cheers,
don

(But that doesn't mean if someone again uses Marxist terms in relation
to WS I won't ask them again what the bleep they're actually saying.)

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kathy Dent <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 2003 15:55:45 +0100
Subject: 14.1775 Re: Tillyard (Again)
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1775 Re: Tillyard (Again)

>I presume that this refers to the performance of France's socialized
>medicine system in the recent heat wave.  I would have thought that
>Clifford holds the French workers' paradise in high esteem.  What could
>be better than a maximum 35-hour work week (including for doctors)
>fourteen weeks of paid vacation and virtual lifetime employment tenure
>regardless of performance and productivity.  Hmmn, I wonder if that
>could have anything to do with their inability to deal with rising
>temperature.

Before we get into a paroxism of French-bashing, should we all spend a
moment considering at what cost to the global environment the Americans
are keeping themselves cool? (Energy, air-conditioning, global
warming... make the connections!)

Kathy Dent

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           R. A. Cantrell <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 11 Sep 2003 10:05:08 -0500
Subject: 14.1758 Re: Tillyard (Again)
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1758 Re: Tillyard (Again)

>Gosh I am surprised to hear this kind of rhetoric still exists (from
>Gabriel but reflecting presumably Clifford's views):

It brings in to sharp relief the distinction between those whose primary
mission  in life is to learn and teach Shakespeare (or any discrete
matter) and those whose primary mission is to "change the world" and who
have battened upon Shakespeare ( or any other discrete mater) as a
vehicle for their zeal. (just some left-over lefties who stayed too long
at [in] the party) Karl Marx dedicated his life to the alleviation of
suffering, but clearly he got the wrong answer. 2

 

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