Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: August ::
Re: Feste's Speeches
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1562  Wednesday, 5 August 2003

[1]     From:   Ted Dykstra <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Aug 2003 22:28:10 EDT
        Subj:   Feste

[2]     From:   James Doyle <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Aug 2003 14:16:51 +0100
        Subj:   Feste's Speeches

[3]     From:   Abigail Quart <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 5 Aug 2003 12:07:35 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.1560 Re: Feste's Speeches


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ted Dykstra <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Aug 2003 22:28:10 EDT
Subject:        Feste

Steve Urkowitz writes:

<< Really good writing always seems improvised. >>

Indeed, Stravinsky said that composition is selected improvisation.

Ted Dykstra

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Doyle <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Aug 2003 14:16:51 +0100
Subject:        Feste's Speeches

Steve Urkowitz comments that it would be unlikely for improvised
speeches to become part of the available (i.e. printed) text.

I tend to agree with him, with the following possible variations:

Firstly, I can well imagine that, during rehearsal, actors (not just the
comic ones) would suggest changes to the lines they had been given,
which could then be written in, and become part of the known text.  Some
of these changes could have been quite large-scale, or, who, knows,
could have even taken place during writing with the comedians
contributing jokes or humorous lines to be fitted in wherever they could
be.

Secondly, in trying to perform some of the comic roles, I have found
that some of the longer speeches have an odd quality, as if - even when
written in prose - they have a hidden internal rhythm designed to
correspond to some physical or other business not written down.  I'm
sure that at times Will would have just jotted down a few lines and said
to the actor, "Just do some of your funny stuff around this, Robert,
whatever you like", and trusted Armin, or Kempe, or whoever to fill out
the character with something to please the groundlings.

None of this is based on scientific analysis of the lines, just trying
to perform them.

James

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 5 Aug 2003 12:07:35 -0400
Subject: 14.1560 Re: Feste's Speeches
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.1560 Re: Feste's Speeches

"The test would be perhaps if Feste's speeches were measurably unique in
Robert-Arminian style. But here I'm drifting into silly season."

Nuh uh. Any playwright worth spit with a regular company of players
knows their speech rhythms and writes to them. That's why the clowns
changed so dramatically when a new actor took the job.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.