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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: August ::
Re: Authorship of Edward III
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1575  Thursday, 7 August 2003

[1]     From:   Bill Arnold <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 6 Aug 2003 07:29:24 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1565 Authorship of Edward III

[2]     From:   Roger Nyle Parisious <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 6 Aug 2003 11:44:10 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1565 Authorship of Edward III


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Arnold <
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Date:           Wednesday, 6 Aug 2003 07:29:24 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 14.1565 Authorship of Edward III
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1565 Authorship of Edward III

Phyllis Gorfain writes, "Of interest to those interested in authorship
of disputed plays and computer-assisted authorship:

>   The following story appeared in The Globe Online:
>  Headline: Much ado about data
>  Date:     8/5/2003
>  Byline:
>
>For years, Shakespeare scholars have debated whether a strange
>16th-century play known as "Edward III" actually was written by
>the bard of Avon himself. Some see Shakespeare's brilliant wit
>in the scene where a clown helps the anxious king compose a love
>letter. And a few suggest the entire work is genuine Shakespeare,
>produced early in his career, and deserves a place in the canon.

Inasmuch as I am not a Shakespearean scholar but a humble scholar, I
cannot comment upon the merits of the play Edward III's suspect
authorship.

But I am curious if SHAKSPEReans recall that during his lifetime, or
shortly thereafter, allegations surfaced the Will S was the author of 46
plays and today we have scholars attesting to, I think the total is,
36?  If these facts are correct, and we look at the fugitive play Love's
Labour's Won and throw in Edward III for good measure, we are up to 38
plays, are we not, and getting closer to that magical 46 number which
haunts the biography of Will S and the authorship questions surrounding
the alleged "Shake-spear" cryptogram in Psalm 46, and the alleged
"Shaking of a spear" cryptogram in Job 41:29, of the KJV, are we not?

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Nyle Parisious <
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Date:           Wednesday, 6 Aug 2003 11:44:10 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 14.1565 Authorship of Edward III
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1565 Authorship of Edward III

So far as Edward III is concerned ,after several readings over a
lifetime I would still most positively give the Countess scenes(Act II)
to Robert Greene and, judging from the percentage of double endings and
run-on lines, mark it as the last identifiable (and best) dramatic work
that he ever did.

Greene would have done this just after completing "George-a-Green"(which
has the Rose managements authority as being his) in other words late
spring to late summer of l592.

Who did the Marlowesque chronicle sequences? They do not seem to be
Marlowe vocabulary wise nor any of the three or four usual suspects.

If, as I believe that the evidence to show, Will Shakspere had long been
brokering the extremely difficult Greene ,we should perhaps be looking
for another Shakspere client who finished off the manuscript, one who
definitely did not write "Venus and Adonis".

Have any of our computer whizzes gone to work on the case of Thomas
Watson? He had a formidable contemporary reputation as a dramatist,
along with his roommates Kyd and Marlowe, but left nothing under his own
name. There is enough Watson poetry around to make some educated
mechanical guesses, though his overt poetic style does not leap out to
suggest any very positive attribution.

Roger Nyle Parisious

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