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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: June ::
Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1149  Tuesday, 10 June 2003

[1]     From:   Don Bloom <
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        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 12:16:54 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly

[2]     From:   David Evett <
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        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 13:44:40 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly

[3]     From:   David Frankel <
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        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 21:45:34 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Bloom <
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Date:           Monday, 9 Jun 2003 12:16:54 -0500
Subject: 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly

Terence Hawkes quotes Bob Rosen

>'At the core of any powerful presentation of emotion must be the
>writer's personal experience.'

and reponds

>Dangerous, romantic nonsense. Writers make things up. It's called 'art'.

It is always dangerous responding to the redoubtable Hawkes for fear of
taking seriously some clever irony and doing a rather embarrassing
pratfall.  But as he appears to be serious, I'll risk the unseen
banana-peel.

It may be dangerous and it may be romantic but it is nonetheless true:
writers do not make up emotions. They make up characters and situations.

The reader (or audience) supplies the emotions, and can supply only what
they have in store (as stimulated by the art of the writer).

Cheers,
don

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <
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Date:           Monday, 9 Jun 2003 13:44:40 -0400
Subject: 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly

>Writers make things up. It's called 'art'.
>
>Terence Hawkes

Nor do writers make things up in a linguistic vacuum.  Virtually all
effective writers are committed, not to say compulsive readers; in their
reading they find imitable representations of emotional states, which
constitute "experiences" as important, maybe for a writer more
important, than the things that happen in other parts of their lives.
And playwrights are mostly playgoers and/or performers.

Derivatively,
David Evett

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Frankel <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 9 Jun 2003 21:45:34 -0400
Subject: 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly

Terence Hawkes <
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 > writes,

>Bob Rosen assures us that
>
>'At the core of any powerful presentation of emotion must be the
>writer's personal experience.'
>
>Dangerous, romantic nonsense. Writers make things up. It's called 'art'.
>
>Terence Hawkes

Doesn't that depend on the meaning of "personal experience?"  One of the
thing's Stanislavski says (at least in an English translation) is that
"observation is the basis of all art."  What I observe is part of my
experience.  I may not have to have undergone the anguish of seven hells
in order to "create it," but I think I must have experienced it through
observation (including, to be sure, the observation -- and experience --
of other works of "art") in order to make it up in a new circumstance

Carol Barton <
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 > writes,

-----------------------stuff cut---------------------------------------

>Bad actors can't assimilate someone else's persona
>and make us forget that their own exists; what allows the good ones to
>do it, if not the ability to empathize with that person's psyche and
>motivations, even when it's Hannibal Lecter rather than Jesus Christ?)
>
>Otherwise, one must shudder to ask how Anthony Hopkins prepared for his
>role as the former?

Perhaps by eating things with relish, both the temperment and the
condiment.

cdf

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