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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: June ::
Re: A Lover's Complaint
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1173  Thursday, 12 June 2003

[1]     From:   Bill Arnold <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Jun 2003 08:12:23 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1158 Re: A Lover's Complaint

[2]     From:   Ward Elliott <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Jun 2003 10:39:52 -0700
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.1158 Re: A Lover's Complaint

[3]     From:   Sam Small <
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        Date:   Thursday, 12 Jun 2003 01:21:33 +0100
        Subj:   The only Shake-scene in town?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Arnold <
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Date:           Wednesday, 11 Jun 2003 08:12:23 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 14.1158 Re: A Lover's Complaint
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1158 Re: A Lover's Complaint

Gabriel Egan writes, "Ward Elliott rejects the objection that writers
imitating one another's style might fool his stylistic tests: We were
skeptical at the time, and remain so, both because of the inherent
improbability -- why would he or anyone do such a thing?  We don't need
to find a reason for imitation of style, simply to admit that it
frequently occurs. We've seen the phenomenon here on SHAKSPER recently.
On 23 May Bill Arnold wrote: yes, Shakespeare wrote the play Hamlet, to
the best of my knowledge, but the character Hamlet in the play Hamlet
reacted in accordance with his CHARACTER.  Never mind what he's writing
about, just look at that characteristic (ie Arnoldian) use of all
uppercase letters for "CHARACTER"."

Hi, Gabriel.  "Arnoldian"?  Will this get me in the OED?  "Ooooooops, I
did IT again!"

If you consult the archives, for me, you will note that here in
retirement in south Florida as an adjunct professor of English I taught
at a community college and had police officers who were/are TAUGHT to
write all in CAPS in their police reports.  Someone accused me of
SHOUTING in CAPS, so I wonder what that MAKES police officers?  All
SHOUTERS?  Tell that to COPS!  Particularly when one is writing up your
next traffic ticket.

Actually, I required all students to write in journals and write in
lower-case cursive so as to learn to write FASTER!  I do write
occasionally in CAPS in REALLY tough-to-convey situations for EMPHASIS
and do not consider it to be shouting :)  Of course I was and am
unconventional and do not like _emphasis_ for emphasis in email, but
then I guess I could opt for *emphasis* for emphasis, but then I would
be considered TOO conventional :)  N'est-ce pas?

So, Gabriel, if I never use an inordinate amount of CAPS again, after
this missive, as I did before we got into the Sanity vs. Insanity
question, would that mean "Arnoldian" would not make the OED? Sheesh!
Or should that be: O.E.D.?

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ward Elliott <
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Date:           Wednesday, 11 Jun 2003 10:39:52 -0700
Subject: 14.1158 Re: A Lover's Complaint
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.1158 Re: A Lover's Complaint

I wonder if Mr. Egan, having read Funeral Elegy and A Lover's Complaint,
both with low rates of enclitic and proclitic microphrases, and
Shakespeare, with middling ones, could write a poem that fit within
Shakespeare's normal ranges without much brow-wrinkling recourse to
Tarlinskaja's rules, even now that they have become the rage among
authorship buffs?

Ward Elliott

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sam Small <
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Date:           Thursday, 12 Jun 2003 01:21:33 +0100
Subject:        The only Shake-scene in town?

Jim Carroll writes in another thread, "If Shakespeare didn't write LC,
who did?  Who else could combine a pastoral setting with lines so
finely, so exquisitely wrought . . ."

Martin Steward has touched on this subject too.  Shakespeare wasn't the
only Shake-scene in town.  Many others were writing verse plays in
iambic pentameter - and I did hear that only a quarter of the material
written in London at the time has survived.  Did any of the other
writers come near to Shakespeare in poetic quality or stagecraft?  Did
they write their own plots?  I'd like to know what others think.

SAM SMALL
http://www.passioninpieces.co.uk

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