2003

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1215  Thursday, 19 June 2003

From:           Roger Parris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 16 Jun 2003 15:06:07 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 14.1198 Stylometrics Idea
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1198 Stylometrics Idea

A more cogent test would be North's Plutarch, where one might advisedly
commence with "Coriolanus". There long strips of prose are transformed
into real verse with a minimum of alteration in the original materials.
For example, the great "Mother, mother, what have you done" speech takes
off directly from North's prose. How does this demonstrable ur-text
relationship with our "Coriolanus" show up on the stylometric tests?

The same question might then be raised with "Julius Caesar", on which
Mr. Elliot has commented here. Do his tests allow for a single authorial
text being revised at two intervals of approximately ten years each as
may be the alternative solution to the Beaumont and Marlowesque
materials appearing in "Julius Caesar"?  And if so can he then
differentiate if, for the sake of argument, say, "Much Ado" or "Henry V"
is a play done or completely redone in l599?

Roger Parisious

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