2003

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1315  Monday, 30 June 2003

[1]     From:   D Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 27 Jun 2003 09:37:57 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1285 Re: Deconstruction

[2]     From:   Takashi Kozuka <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 29 Jun 2003 00:23:41 0000
        Subj:   Re: Deconstruction


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           D Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 27 Jun 2003 09:37:57 -0500
Subject: 14.1285 Re: Deconstruction
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1285 Re: Deconstruction

Martin Steward writes

>Deconstruction is only about language and not about "reality", except
>insofar as its practitioners generally hold the epistemological position
>that the world is experienced exclusively through language.

I'm finding some difficulty working this out. How do you experience the
world through language? At all, much less "exclusively"?

I experience other people's experiences through their use of language
(some poetical, some not). I can express my experience of the world
through my use of language. But the experience itself is handled other
where.

Puzzled,
don

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Takashi Kozuka <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 29 Jun 2003 00:23:41 0000
Subject:        Re: Deconstruction

It is true that deconstruction is often regarded and taught as a theory
or concept, but I would like to draw your attention to what Christopher
Norris (another contributor to _life.after.theory_) wants to say about
it:

"Derrida has good reason for resisting any attempt, on the part of his
disciples and commentators, to reduce deconstruction to a CONCEPT
definable in terms of method or technique. For it is precisely this idea
- this assumption that meaning can always be grasped in
the form of some proper, self-identical concept - that Derrida is most
determinedly out to deconstruct. [...] To think of deconstruction as a
'method' is to pull it back to the orbit of those traditional concepts
and categories which (as Derrida argues) have organized
the discourse of Western reason from the time of its ancient Greek
inception. It is to set aside the detailed and specific ACTIVITY of
deconstructive reading in favour of a generalized IDEA of that
activity, an idea assumed to comprehend all its differences of local
application." (_Derrida_)

Best wishes,
Takashi Kozuka

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