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Home :: Archive :: 2003 :: June ::
Re: "But me no buts"
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1321  Monday, 30 June 2003

[1]     From:   Lea Luecking Frost <
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        Date:   Friday, 27 Jun 2003 14:14:33 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1309 Re: "But me no buts"

[2]     From:   Nora Kreimer <
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        Date:   Friday, 27 Jun 2003 19:03:17 -0300
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1309 Re: "But me no buts"

[3]     From:   Janet Costa <
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        Date:   Friday, 27 Jun 2003 18:10:45 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1309 Re: "But me no buts"

[4]     From:   Karyn White <
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        Date:   Saturday, 28 Jun 2003 11:59:14 +0900
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1309 Re: "But me no buts"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lea Luecking Frost <
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Date:           Friday, 27 Jun 2003 14:14:33 -0500
Subject: 14.1309 Re: "But me no buts"
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1309 Re: "But me no buts"

William Davis said:

>So, at the risk of repeating what someone
>else has likely
>already shared, I believe this phrase is an intentional,
>comedic
>corruption of Gaunt's words in Richard II, who originally
>said, "Grace
>me no grace, nor uncle me no uncle.  I'm no traitor's
>uncle, and that
>word grace in an ungracious mouth is but profane."  (My
>apologies for
>not having the exact citation, but I'm going from memory).

You've got the quote right, but the speaker wrong: it's York who says
that, not Gaunt.

Regards,
Lea

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nora Kreimer <
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Date:           Friday, 27 Jun 2003 19:03:17 -0300
Subject: 14.1309 Re: "But me no buts"
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1309 Re: "But me no buts"

From Bartleby.com

10467
But me no buts.
          Henry Fielding: Rape upon Rape, act ii. sc. 2. Aaron Hill:
Snake in the Grass, sc. 1.
10468
    Cause me no causes.
          Philip Massinger: A New Way to Pay Old Debts, act i. sc. 3.
10469
    Clerk me no clerks.
          Sir Walter Scott: Ivanhoe, chap. xx.
10470
    Diamond me no diamonds! prize me no prizes!
          Alfred Tennyson: Idylls of the King. Elaine.
10471
    End me no ends.
          Philip Massinger: A New Way to Pay Old Debts, act v. sc. 1.
10472
    Fool me no fools.
          Bulwer: Last Days of Pompeii, book iii. chap. vi.
10473
    Front me no fronts.
          Ford: The Lady's Trial, act ii. sc. 1.

http://www.bartleby.com/100/pages/page1053.html

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Janet Costa <
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Date:           Friday, 27 Jun 2003 18:10:45 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 14.1309 Re: "But me no buts"
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1309 Re: "But me no buts"

>William Davis writes: Perhaps this is why "But me no buts" sounds
>familiar - but don't quote me no quotes on that, because I'm not
>absolutely sure.

Gee, I thought it sounded familiar because I used to hear it from either
Mom or Dad at least once a week, when I was growing up - usually when
there was no hope of getting what I wanted!!

Janet

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karyn White <
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Date:           Saturday, 28 Jun 2003 11:59:14 +0900
Subject: 14.1309 Re: "But me no buts"
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1309 Re: "But me no buts"

There is also the line in "Romeo and Juliet" "Thank me no thankings nor
proud me no prouds,/ But fettle your fine joints 'gainst Thursday next/
To go with Paris to Saint Peter's Church." (Act III, scene v).

Karyn

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