2003

Re: MND for the Summer Solstice

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1150  Tuesday, 10 June 2003

From:           Carl Fortunato <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Jun 2003 13:51:51 EDT
Subject: 14.1126 Re: MND for the Summer Solstice
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1126 Re: MND for the Summer Solstice

Paul has done these Shakespeare Marathons for a few years now, and I've
participated in a few of them.   They're great fun.  My wife and I are
directing one of the Midsummer readings this year.

In doing the Instant Shakespeare, wherein we pretty much just pick up a
text and act it cold, I have found that "fast" helps.  But the correct
word might not be "fast," but "natural."  Certainly not gabbling.
Conversational speech tends to be quick.  Paul is also correct that the
odd punctuation and capitalization in the Folio often work perfectly
well when spoken, although it looks odd printed.  If you think of a
comma as simply a pause, instead of a grammatical device to set off
dependent clauses, it often works well.

Carl Fortunato

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Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1149  Tuesday, 10 June 2003

[1]     From:   Don Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 12:16:54 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly

[2]     From:   David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 13:44:40 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly

[3]     From:   David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 21:45:34 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Jun 2003 12:16:54 -0500
Subject: 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly

Terence Hawkes quotes Bob Rosen

>'At the core of any powerful presentation of emotion must be the
>writer's personal experience.'

and reponds

>Dangerous, romantic nonsense. Writers make things up. It's called 'art'.

It is always dangerous responding to the redoubtable Hawkes for fear of
taking seriously some clever irony and doing a rather embarrassing
pratfall.  But as he appears to be serious, I'll risk the unseen
banana-peel.

It may be dangerous and it may be romantic but it is nonetheless true:
writers do not make up emotions. They make up characters and situations.

The reader (or audience) supplies the emotions, and can supply only what
they have in store (as stimulated by the art of the writer).

Cheers,
don

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Jun 2003 13:44:40 -0400
Subject: 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly

>Writers make things up. It's called 'art'.
>
>Terence Hawkes

Nor do writers make things up in a linguistic vacuum.  Virtually all
effective writers are committed, not to say compulsive readers; in their
reading they find imitable representations of emotional states, which
constitute "experiences" as important, maybe for a writer more
important, than the things that happen in other parts of their lives.
And playwrights are mostly playgoers and/or performers.

Derivatively,
David Evett

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Jun 2003 21:45:34 -0400
Subject: 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.1127 Re: Santayana Quoted Correctly

Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> writes,

>Bob Rosen assures us that
>
>'At the core of any powerful presentation of emotion must be the
>writer's personal experience.'
>
>Dangerous, romantic nonsense. Writers make things up. It's called 'art'.
>
>Terence Hawkes

Doesn't that depend on the meaning of "personal experience?"  One of the
thing's Stanislavski says (at least in an English translation) is that
"observation is the basis of all art."  What I observe is part of my
experience.  I may not have to have undergone the anguish of seven hells
in order to "create it," but I think I must have experienced it through
observation (including, to be sure, the observation -- and experience --
of other works of "art") in order to make it up in a new circumstance

Carol Barton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.> writes,

-----------------------stuff cut---------------------------------------

>Bad actors can't assimilate someone else's persona
>and make us forget that their own exists; what allows the good ones to
>do it, if not the ability to empathize with that person's psyche and
>motivations, even when it's Hannibal Lecter rather than Jesus Christ?)
>
>Otherwise, one must shudder to ask how Anthony Hopkins prepared for his
>role as the former?

Perhaps by eating things with relish, both the temperment and the
condiment.

cdf

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Re: Hamlet and Grebanier

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1147  Tuesday, 10 June 2003

[1]     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 13:24:00 -0300
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.1124 Re: Hamlet and Grebanier

[2]     From:   Edward Brown <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 12:39:19 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1124 Re: Hamlet and Grebanier

[3]     From:   Don Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 12:03:06 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1124 Re: Hamlet and Grebanier

[4]     From:   Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 17:46:40 +0100
        Subj:   SHK 14.1124 Re: Hamlet and Grebanier

[5]     From:   Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 17:51:53 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1124 Re: Hamlet and Grebanier

[6]     From:   Annalisa Castaldo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 15:13:59 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1124 Re: Hamlet and Grebanier

[7]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 09 Jun 2003 16:40:13 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1124 Re: Hamlet and Grebanier

[8]     From:   David Frankel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 21:19:08 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.1124 Re: Hamlet and Grebanier

[9]     From:   Mari Bonomi <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 23:43:04 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 14.1124 Re: Hamlet and Grebanier

[10]     From:  Rafael Acuna <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 10 Jun 2003 20:53:47 +0800
        Subj:   Re: Hamlet and Grebanier


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Jun 2003 13:24:00 -0300
Subject: 14.1124 Re: Hamlet and Grebanier
Comment:        RE: SHK 14.1124 Re: Hamlet and Grebanier

Bill Arnold suggests to one of his PATIENT interlocutors that

>Understand, you are invoking the notion that Hamlet or people
>might also be PRETENDING to be INSANE while SANE; but how does a truly
>INSANE person escape his/her DEFINED state?  If they can BE sane at
>times, then they are not truly INSANE, are they?  They are truly SANE,
>and at times ACTING insanely, and I guarantee you there is a BIG
>difference: as in BIG PICTURE.

These capitalized WORDS are really handy.  In fact, I recall that John
le Carr


Re: Winter's Tale on Video

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1148  Tuesday, 10 June 2003

[1]     From:   Steven Marx <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 09:55:34 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1130 Winter's Tale on Video

[2]     From:   Ben Spiller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 20:09:48 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1130 Winter's Tale on Video

[3]     From:   Arthur Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 10 Jun 2003 08:59:32 +0800 (SGT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1130 Winter's Tale on Video


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steven Marx <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Jun 2003 09:55:34 -0700
Subject: 14.1130 Winter's Tale on Video
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1130 Winter's Tale on Video

You can find some very amateurish but inventive student performances of
scenes at

http://cla.calpoly.edu/~smarx/Shakespeare/triang/performing/WT510fil.html

and

http://cla.calpoly.edu/~smarx/Shakespeare/triang/performing/WT431fil.html

Steven Marx

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ben Spiller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Jun 2003 20:09:48 +0100
Subject: 14.1130 Winter's Tale on Video
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1130 Winter's Tale on Video

How's about the RSC video of the 1998-99 production, with Antony Sher as
Leontes, Alex Gilbreath as Hermione and Estelle Kohler as Paulina?  It's
a 'Production Casebook' (Heritage Theatre/RSC co-production) with
comments from performers, director (Greg Doran), designer (Robert Jones)
and Cis Berry, edited-in between scenes filmed at the Barbican.  I'd
recommend it heartily.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Arthur Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 10 Jun 2003 08:59:32 +0800 (SGT)
Subject: 14.1130 Winter's Tale on Video
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1130 Winter's Tale on Video

Could I make the same request regarding Jonson's Epicoene?  A colleague
is teaching it in a course we share.

Arthur Lindley

_______________________________________________________________
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Re: Polonius and Reynaldo

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1146  Tuesday, 10 June 2003

[1]     From:   Linda Englade <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 9 Jun 2003 09:21:39 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1133 Polonius and Reynaldo

[2]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 09 Jun 2003 15:40:58 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1133 Polonius and Reynaldo


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Linda Englade <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 9 Jun 2003 09:21:39 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 14.1133 Polonius and Reynaldo
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1133 Polonius and Reynaldo

I'm sure this won't be very helpful for a paper, but there is always the
consideration that Shakespeare was writing for a specific acting
company.  The part of Reynaldo might have been inserted partially
because of the number of roles needed for the players.

Otherwise, it could be interesting to look at the fact that Polonius
might be intimately acquainted with all the mentioned vices, yet be a
prominent figure in (symptom of) the Danish court.

Linda Englade

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 09 Jun 2003 15:40:58 -0400
Subject: 14.1133 Polonius and Reynaldo
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1133 Polonius and Reynaldo

The answer to Kenneth Chan's query about the "reasons ... for inclusion
of this dialogue" can be found in the recent colloquy between Ed Pixley
and myself about the function of this passage.  It serves the same
purpose as the device of falling calendar pages did in 1930s cinema --
it illustrates the passage of time.

Incidentally, it also elaborates on Polonius's "indirect" methods,
which, together with the advice to Laertes, provides the most
satisfactory explanation for Hamlet's recognition of Polonius's hand in
the Nunnery Scene.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
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