2003

Re: Edmund

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1291  Wednesday, 25 June 2003

From:           Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 Jun 2003 09:30:56 -0400
Subject:        France

In response to my questions about France returning to his realm and
"abandoning" Cordelia, L. Swilley responds:

"The King of France's error is not that he should have returned to
France (there being something "imperfect" there), but that he  should
not have taken his Queen back to France with him; in this there is the
vague suggestion of his likeness to Albany, whose lack of control of his
wife is partially responsible for the tragedy."

This is an interesting point of view, though I would hasten to add that
the putative likeness between France and Albany is not convincing.
France stands up to Lear in 1.1 and, near the end of the scene, Goneril
and Regan apparently hear both men having words with each other
offstage. France does not seem to be a Casper Milktoast type.

Isn't it implied that Cordelia has made up her mind to save her father
and that nothing can stop her? Doesn't she find herself in a double
bind? Fight for her father or stay by the side of France? Doesn't France
put her in that position by not agreeing to lead her forces -- whether
we believe his reason/excuse or not?

Friendly questions, Louis.

Regards,
--Ed

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TNT Caesar Mini-Series

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1290  Wednesday, 25 June 2003

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 Jun 2003 08:54:20 -0400
Subject:        TNT Caesar Mini-Series

"Unlike Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar and many films that have
focused on the latter part of his life, TNT's epic tale begins when
Caesar is a young man, opposed to the tyrannical dictatorship of Sulla."

http://www.tnt.tv/Title/Display/0,5918,439534~TNTOriginals,00.html

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/

Geneva Bible on CD-Rom

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1288  Wednesday, 25 June 2003

From:           Thomas Larque <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 Jun 2003 12:53:29 +0100
Subject:        Geneva Bible on CD-Rom

Although I have a facsimile copy of the Geneva Bible (the Bible
translation which Shakespeare is usually considered to have used most
often), I have long been searching for a searchable electronic version
of the Geneva text.  I seem to remember seeing many requests for this
sort of information on SHAKSPER and elsewhere.

I finally found what I was looking for.  Sola Scriptura Publishing
(http://www.solascripturapublishing.com/) produces a CD-Rom of the 1599
Geneva Bible (in text, Word and PDF formats) for the very reasonable
price of $9.99 (US dollars) and accepts credit card payments via
Paypal.  Unfortunately the CD only contains the Old and New Testaments,
not the Biblical Apocrypha, but perhaps if lots of Shakespeareans order
the current CD and express an interest in the Apocrypha they might
release that as well.

I thought SHAKSPEReans might be interested in this offer, so am posting
it here.  Needless to say, I have no connection with the company that
produces this CD and have nothing to gain from orders of it.

The CD-Rom only contains the Geneva Bible text itself, no extra search
tools are included.  Does anybody happen to know of any software that
would be able to search for particular words in individual paragraphs in
text or Word files (so that it is possible to search the Bible text for
a verse - a particular paragraph - that contains the words "tower" and
"hope", for example)?  Given the variations in Renaissance spelling, a
wild card function would also be useful  (so that it is possible to
search for "we*u*r*" and "we*v*r*" and find most possible Renaissance
spellings of the word "weaver", for example).  Any suggestions would be
much appreciated.

Thomas Larque.
"Shakespeare and His Critics"
http://shakespearean.org.uk

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Othello 1811 and Charles Lamb

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1289  Wednesday, 25 June 2003

From:           Rolland Banker <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 Jun 2003 05:43:45 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 1261 Othello 1811 and Charles Lamb
Comment:        SHK 14. 1261 Othello 1811 and Charles Lamb

In Charles Lamb's "Tragedies of Shakespeare, considered with reference
to their fitness for stage representation."(1811)

Lamb states in a typically archaic 19th century viewpoint:

"Nothing can be more soothing, more flattering to the nobler parts of
our natures, than to read of a young Venetian lady of highest
extraction, through the force of love and from a sense of merit in him
whom she loved, laying aside every consideration of kindred, and
country, and colour, and wedding with a coal-black Moor--(for such he is
represented, in the imperfect state of knowledge respecting foreign
countries in those days, compared with our own or in compliance with
popular notions, though the Moors are now well enough known to be by
many shades less unworthy of a white woman's fancy)--it is the perfect
triumph of virtue over accidents, of the imagination over the senses.
She sees Othello's colour in his mind. But upon the stage, when the
imagination is no longer the ruling faculty, but we are left to our poor
unassisted senses, I appeal to every one that has seen Othello played,
whether he did not, on the contrary, sink Othello's mind in his color;
whether he did not find something extremely revolting in the courtship
and wedded caresses of Othello and Desdemona; and whether the actual
sight of the thing did not over-weigh all that beautiful compromise
which we make in reading;...." End of Lamb quote.

Therefore, Shakespeare with deft knowledge and understanding of the
human sensibilities of his time, yet with an intellect vastly superior
to us presented a play to see (ocular proof) and a script to
hear,--perchance to read, of spectacular genius. A marriage of true
minds--no impediments admitted.

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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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Re: Harold Bloom on Othello

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1287  Wednesday, 25 June 2003

From:           Drew Whitehead <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 Jun 2003 14:05:52 +1000
Subject: 14.1265 Re: Harold Bloom on Othello
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1265 Re: Harold Bloom on Othello

Then of course there is the problem of time in Othello.  As many have
noted the play (seemingly on purpose) does not contain enough time for
the action that occurs in it. This has the effect of making it move at a
helter-skelter pace and in that context anything is possible.

Drew Whitehead.

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S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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