2003

Re: Non Sans Droict 2

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1271  Tuesday, 24 June 2003

From:           Carol Barton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 23 Jun 2003 17:51:40 -0400
Subject: 14.1255 Re: Non Sans Droict
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1255 Re: Non Sans Droict

Dieu et mon droit is not Tudor, and it means "God and my right"---not my
right arm. (It is the Stuart motto.)

The Tudor motto is "honi soit qui mal y pense."

Carol Barton

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Re: Non Sans Droict

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1270  Tuesday, 24 June 2003

[1]     From:   Bill Arnold <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 23 Jun 2003 08:52:01 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 14.1255 Re: Non Sans Droict

[2]     From:   Takashi Kozuka <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 23 Jun 2003 21:56:30 0000
        Subj:   Re: Non Sanz Droict


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Arnold <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 23 Jun 2003 08:52:01 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 14.1255 Re: Non Sans Droict
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1255 Re: Non Sans Droict

Clifford Stetner writes, "Doesn't this phrase echo the Tudor motto:
'dieu et mon droit?' I read somewhere that 'mon droit' is synecdoche for
'my strong (right) sword arm.' Before I wade through the seven full
pages in the big OED, is this true?  Does it have aught to do with the
etymology of 'rights?' The synecdochal 'right' would nuance
Shakespeare's supposed motto with or without the comma.  'Not without my
writing arm?' 'No, without a sword?' 'Not without a sword?'"

Interesting.  The motto for the Shakespeare Coat of Arms in the latter
sense would fit the artwork.  It appears the pun on the sword aka pen of
the author aka spear in his name would all reflect on the puns on his
name, as indeed, it appears the coat of arms was all about?  Don't we
know Will S was a master of the pun?

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Takashi Kozuka <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 23 Jun 2003 21:56:30 0000
Subject:        Re: Non Sanz Droict

Philip Tomposki wrote:

>The phrase appears three times [...]

On one of the TWO drafts of 1596, yes, it appears three times. We should
remember that the other draft, too, has the phrase, so it appears FOUR
times all together.

Best wishes,
Takashi Kozuka

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Re: Citation Site

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1268  Tuesday, 24 June 2003

From:           David Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 23 Jun 2003 16:38:59 GMT0BST
Subject: 14.1256 Citation Site
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1256 Citation Site

Citations

It may only be relevant to the UK - but I use the Web of Science, which
is available through my institution's library.

David Lindley
University of Leeds

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare and European Politics

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1269  Tuesday, 24 June 2003

From:           Sam Small <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 23 Jun 2003 17:35:03 +0100
Subject: 14.1230 Shakespeare and European Politics
Comment:        Re: SHK 14.1230 Shakespeare and European Politics

Does anyone think that Shakespeare's plays and poems are a prelude to
the sort of Euro-fanaticism currently screeching its credo to many of us
in the UK today?  One of the greatest gifts from Shakespeare is his
political universality.  He was as typically English as he was a citizen
of the world with no reference to creating a Euro-Empire run by
Germany.  His references to Italy, for instance, were for the culture
and fashion of the time and not to their system of government.  These
European cities were setting for great human stories - they could have
been Martian for all he cared.  What bothers me is that some may take
this conference as in some way associating Shakespeare's work with the
formation of a Euro-State.

SAM SMALL

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Hamlet ("bad quarto") at the BL

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 14.1267  Tuesday, 24 June 2003

From:           Takashi Kozuka <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 23 Jun 2003 22:30:35 0000
Subject:        Hamlet ("bad quarto") at the BL

From the Guardian, Saturday 21 June 2003

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,3604,982092,00.html

"Bootlegged, but it beat the Bard"
Fiachra Gibbons

.....
The version of Hamlet known as the "bad quarto" is a salutary warning of
the dangers of literary piracy. An entrepreneurial player in Richard
Burbage's company at the Rose Theatre, where Hamlet is believed to have
been first staged, beat the Bard to the press with a version of the play
he remembered from rehearsals and its first performances in 1600.
     .....
Now the British Library has produced a facsimile edition, for the first
time, from its copy of the "bad quarto", only one of two still in
existence.
     .....
Original copies of the good and bad quartos are on display at the
library in London in an exhibition which also features a version of the
play translated into Klingon, the alien language spoken in the
television series Star Trek.
     .....
A limited-edition reprint of the bad quarto is now on sale [


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