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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: February ::
Anti-Heroes in English Literature
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0295  Tuesday, 3 February 2004

[1]     From:   Annalisa Castaldo <
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        Date:   Monday, 2 Feb 2004 08:18:36 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature

[2]     From:   Martin Steward <
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        Date:   Monday, 2 Feb 2004 13:53:53 -0000
        Subj:   SHK 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature

[3]     From:   D Bloom <
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        Date:   Monday, 2 Feb 2004 08:01:04 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature

[4]     From:   Brooke Morrill <
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        Date:   Monday, 02 Feb 2004 12:55:21 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature

[5]     From:   Donald Jellerson <
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        Date:   Monday, 2 Feb 2004 11:33:59 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature

[6]     From:   Ruth Ross <
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        Date:   Monday, 2 Feb 2004 17:51:41 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature

[7]     From:   Hugh Grady <
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        Date:   Monday, 2 Feb 2004 21:10:54 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Annalisa Castaldo <
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Date:           Monday, 2 Feb 2004 08:18:36 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature

Marlowe is always good for the anti-hero, especially Dr. Faustus and
Barabas.

While not pre-Shakespearean, many people feel that Lucifer is the true
(anti) hero of Paradise Lost

Depending on your definition, Chaucer's Pardoner could be an anti-hero
of his own tale and (especially) his prologue.

Annalisa Castaldo

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <
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Date:           Monday, 2 Feb 2004 13:53:53 -0000
Subject: Anti-Heroes in English Literature
Comment:        SHK 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature

Tamburlaine seems an obvious place to start.

What about the Wife of Bath?

Milton's Satan (and Romantic responses to him) would be excellent for
discussing how the concept of "anti-hero" is context-specific.

M

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           D Bloom <
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Date:           Monday, 2 Feb 2004 08:01:04 -0600
Subject: 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature

Stuart Manger asks,

 >Apart from Falstaff etc, can any scholar in the group offer me advice
 >about which characters I might include in a short course on Anti-Heroes?
 >They need not be Shakespearean.

I have never thought much of Falstaff as a scholar. Though learned in
his own way, he seems never to have used his knowledge for anything
except rude jokes and blasphemy.

Sincerely,
Holofernes D. Pedant

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Brooke Morrill <
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Date:           Monday, 02 Feb 2004 12:55:21 -0500
Subject: 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature

Stuart Manger writes:

 >Apart from Falstaff etc, can any scholar in the group offer me advice
 >about which characters I might include in a short course on Anti-Heroes?
 >They need not be Shakespearean. Preferably pre-Shakespeare?
 >
 >I feel rather humiliated to be stumped.

I am not sure what your specific criteria are for an "anti-hero," but
I have a feeling that Tamburlaine might be worth a look.

RBMJR

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Donald Jellerson <
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Date:           Monday, 2 Feb 2004 11:33:59 -0800
Subject: 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature

 >Apart from Falstaff etc, can any scholar in the group offer me advice
 >about which characters I might include in a short course on Anti-Heroes?
 >They need not be Shakespearean. Preferably pre-Shakespeare?

What about Chaucer's Wife of Bath?

Can you use Shakespeare's Spanish contemporary, Cervantes?  If so, I
like Sancho Panza for the anti-hero category.

Best wishes,
Donald Jellerson

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ruth Ross <
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Date:           Monday, 2 Feb 2004 17:51:41 -0500
Subject: 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature

How about Antigone or Oedipus? Although the women in my classes love
Antigone, I take pains to point out that she's going against the
traditional view of Greek womanhood (Ismene is the model Greek woman
of the time) and really gets obnoxious as the play goes on. Not that
Creon's a winner.  Anyway, the "hero" or protagonist of that play
shifts from time to time, making her an anti-hero and heroine at the
same time.

Ruth Ross

[7]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hugh Grady <
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Date:           Monday, 2 Feb 2004 21:10:54 -0500
Subject: 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0272 Anti-Heroes in English Literature

Is there any other kind in Marlowe?

--Hugh Grady

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