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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: February ::
New Web site: Open Source Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0385  Tuesday, 10 February 2004

[1]     From:   Nancy Charlton <
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 >
        Date:   Monday, 09 Feb 2004 10:33:43 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0362 New Web site: Open Source Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Eric M. Johnson <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 10 Feb 2004 00:27:56 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0362 New Web site: Open Source Shakespeare

[3]     From:   Hardy M. Cook <
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        Date:   Tuesday, February 10, 2004
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0362 New Web site: Open Source Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nancy Charlton <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 09 Feb 2004 10:33:43 -0800
Subject: 15.0362 New Web site: Open Source Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0362 New Web site: Open Source Shakespeare

 >Eric M. Johnson wrote
 >
 >Although I am new to the SHAKSPER list, I would like to make a shameless
 >plug for my Web site project, called Open Source Shakespeare, or OSS for
 >short. As of Friday, all of Shakespeare's works are on the site, ready
 >to be searched and browsed. The address is
 >http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org.

Eric, your "shameless plug" is most appreciated--in this quarter,
anyhow. I searched a fairly obscure word, "kecksies," and it came right
up with Henry V's whole speech with columns showing playtitle,
character, act and scene, and finally the passage, replete with keywords
highlighted. I tried narrowing the search for a common word, "horse,"
several different ways and those came right up too. Same with several
proper names. It finds words in the stage directions, or at least it
found five instances of "exeunt."  I am impressed with its speed: not
only did the site come right up but each search is there before you can
take your hands off the keyboard.

If it could be made available in a form that could utilize the browser's
utility to increase the type size, it would be as close to perfect as
anything could be, but I would guess that the text was scanned rather
than typed in by hand.

Bartleby's search engine is nowhere near as good, though it's pleasant
to read from; Matty Farrow's is comprehensive, but hard to get to and
lacks an elegant interface. From what I've seen so far, Eric's search
engine, with its ability to use Boolean operators (or at least 2 of 3)
and narrow down by play, character, genre and date, could be considered
an exemplum among its kind.

Congratulations and thanks, Eric

Nancy Charlton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eric M. Johnson <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 10 Feb 2004 00:27:56 -0500
Subject: 15.0362 New Web site: Open Source Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0362 New Web site: Open Source Shakespeare

Many thanks for all of you who wrote me about Open Source Shakespeare
(http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org), including all of you who pointed
out the glitches. Right now, everything you reported is fixed, including
the omission of stage directions (which was a programming error on my
part). If you see any other errors, please let me know.

I appreciate all of the suggestions you passed along, such as: including
line numbers with the text, and incorporating character name changes
(such as when Prince Hal becomes Henry V. Right now, Henry V is Henry V
whether you look at "Henry IV, Part 2" or "Henry V.") Additional
suggestions will be greeted with open arms.

Eric

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Tuesday, February 10, 2004
Subject: 15.0362 New Web site: Open Source Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0362 New Web site: Open Source Shakespeare

This is not a criticism of Eric's web site; it is a question raised by it.

Is there a public domain text that sites like Eric's might use instead
of the ever-present Moby Shakespeare?

The Moby Shakespeare is, I believed, derived from The Stratford Town
modern-spelling edition of 1911, edited by Arthur Bullen.  Terry A. Gray
of _Mr. William Shakespeare and the Internet_
<http://daphne.palomar.edu/shakespeare/default.htm>, however, cautiously
notes in reference to the 1866 Globe Edition from the University of
Virginia that "The Globe edition seems to have been the source for the .
. . 'Complete Moby Shakespeare'."   Both the Moby text of _King Lear_
and Bartleby.com's 1914 Oxford edition of the _Complete Works of William
Shakespeare_ edited by W. J. Craig
<http://www.bartleby.com/70/index.html > are based on Q1 rather than F1
and thus the concluding speech of the play is assigned to Albany rather
than to Edgar. _The Complete Works of William Shakespeare_
<http://the-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/> and Matty Farrow's _The Works of
the Bard_ <http://www.it.usyd.edu.au/~matty/Shakespeare/> both use the
Moby texts.





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