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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: February ::
The Cordelia Game
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0389  Tuesday, 10 February 2004

[1]     From:   Edmund Taft <
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        Date:   Monday, 09 Feb 2004 12:00:08 -0500
        Subj:   The Cordelia game

[2]     From:   Scott Sharplin <
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        Date:   Monday, 9 Feb 2004 13:58:56 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0364 The Cordelia Game

[3]     From:   Clifford Stetner <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 10 Feb 2004 03:03:51 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0364 The Cordelia Game

[4]     From:   Dan Smith <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 10 Feb 2004 09:34:20 -0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0364 The Cordelia Game


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Edmund Taft <
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Date:           Monday, 09 Feb 2004 12:00:08 -0500
Subject:        The Cordelia game

I'll play, Andy, though my response is only light-hearted in part: The
key to the opening scene is that it doesn't have to happen. The kingdom
is already divided before Lear arrives on stage. What, then, is his
"darker" purpose? He actually tells us in a quasi-aside that he had
planned to grow old(er?) in the company of Cordelia. So this whole
"How-much-do-I-love -daddy "ploy is just that - a ploy to trap Cordelia.
If she says that all her love is for her father, then Lear will
triumphantly call in her suitors, make Cordelia repeat what she said,
and then Cordleia and Lear will go off to their "third" of the kingdom
and live happily ever after.

Except that life with father won't be so happy. Within a short time,
Cordelia will try to escape but be thwarted by Lear's servants, who
bring her back home. Realizing that she is trapped forever now, she
commits suicide. Lear, finally recognizing the gravity of what he has
done, also commits suicide. Goneril and Regan divide up the kingdom but
soon civil war breaks out between them. Edmund, arriving with the French
king, takes over and becomes the British king. His first acts are to
hang Edgar and Gloucester. Then he marries the sister of the French
king, whereupon, Goneril and Regan commit suicide.

Spectators gasp and cry, "Is this the promised end?" Edmund just smiles.

Ed(mund) Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Sharplin <
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Date:           Monday, 9 Feb 2004 13:58:56 -0700 (MST)
Subject: 15.0364 The Cordelia Game
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0364 The Cordelia Game

Re: The Cordelia Game

OK, how about: "Sorry, sweetie, I must have lost that handkerchief."

Whether it ended happily or tragically, I suspect that line from
Desdemona's mouth would have ended "Othello" a lot faster.

Scott Sharplin

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Stetner <
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Date:           Tuesday, 10 Feb 2004 03:03:51 -0500
Subject: 15.0364 The Cordelia Game
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0364 The Cordelia Game

Venus and Adonis

Over one arm the lusty goddess' leg,
In his other hand her tender breast
He blush'd but did not stop to beg,
Or deign her fickleness to test;
She red and hot as coals of glowing fire,
He frosty in shame, but red hot for desire.

Rape of Lucrece

This earthly devil, adoring this saint
Little deceiveth her virtuous mind
For stained thoughts are so used to their taint;
The herdsmen their own odour never find:
Revolted thus she turneth him away
And bids him with his horse in stable stay.

Comedy of Errors

AEGEON        My youngest boy, and yet my eldest care,
At eighteen years became inquisitive
After his brother: and importuned me
That his attendant--so his case was like,
Reft of his brother, but retain'd his name--
Might bear him company in the quest of him:

DUKE SOLINUS        Try all the friends thou hast in Ephesus;
Thy wife's name thou didst not tell unto us

AEG Her name when I knew her was Aemelia

DUKE That name sounds curiously familiar
And what of those four twins of Syracuse;
What titles now do they all choose to use?

AEG My sons both are Antipholus by name
By Dromio their men are called the same
They all are of the age of twenty three
And otherwise they look a lot like me.

DUKE Well by God's sonties that's a funny thing
And in my head methinks a bell doth ring
We have one here among in Ephesus
That goes by the name of Antipholus
He hath a servant of his age or so
That he calls Romeo or Dromio

Etc.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dan Smith <
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Date:           Tuesday, 10 Feb 2004 09:34:20 -0000
Subject: 15.0364 The Cordelia Game
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0364 The Cordelia Game

Henry V - "I think this kingship dossier is decidedly dodgy. Anyone for
tennis?"
Or
Dauphin "Woah! It's much too muddy for my horse today."

Titus - "Thanks, I'd love to be Emperor."
Or
Tamora - "I don't want to make a fuss but is this vegan?"

Duncan "Sorry to have kept everyone awake, insomnia's a real curse".

Edward the Fourth "George begins with G...No wait Richard Duke of
Gloucester has a G in it too.  Let's do the job properly and execute
them both.  Today we settle all family business".

The Duke (almost anywhere)"Yes, it's me!"

Hamlet (on a note - act 1 sc.1) "Sorry things got so heavy mom, gone
back to Wittemberg."

Antonio "Me lend you money to woo a girl?!"
Bassanio "You're right, lets not fight it anymore, kiss me Antonio!"
Or
Portia's Father (writing) 'If I fail of the right casket, never in my
life to woo a maid in way of marriage'.  "No wait! That will only deter
straight men....maybe this whole thing is a bad idea".

Julius Caesar - "I'm chucking a sickie today dear."
Or
Mark Antony "It's tragic but I suppose it had to be done."

Juliet "Sorry, Daddy, I'd love to but I simply can't. I'm married already."

Dan Smith

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