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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: February ::
Banned Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0401  Wednesday, 11 February 2004

[1]     From:   D Bloom <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 10 Feb 2004 13:51:06 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0381 Banned Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Ruth Ross <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 10 Feb 2004 16:53:16 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 15.0381 Banned Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           D Bloom <
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Date:           Tuesday, 10 Feb 2004 13:51:06 -0600
Subject: 15.0381 Banned Shakespeare
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0381 Banned Shakespeare

Martin Steward responds:

 >[Romeo & Juliet] is also 'more about heterosexuality than love" in the
 >sense that it elevates heterosexual love above other kinds of love that
 >figure in the play, such as that of daughters for their fathers, for
 >example; or the publicly-virtuous citizen's love of the common good . . .

We seem to be talking at cross purposes here. I felt that he was
assuming that all romantic love is necessarily heterosexual -- and I
guess I still do. If in the paragraph above we substituted "romantic"
for "heterosexual," then I would have no argument with the point. What
is definitive about the love of R & J is that it is romantic, rather the
filial or patriotic or some other kind of love. Surely this is a kind of
love that non-heterosexuals can have, and have to an excess that leads
to disaster.

Would a play that was about excessive homosexual romantic love (such as
*Edward II*) be less objectionable?

Cheers,
don

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ruth Ross <
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Date:           Tuesday, 10 Feb 2004 16:53:16 -0500
Subject: 15.0381 Banned Shakespeare
Comment:        RE: SHK 15.0381 Banned Shakespeare

David,

While most teens who read the play identify and sympathize with Romeo
and Juliet -- against her mean parents -- I often point out to them that
R & J are not behaving like well-mannered Elizabethan young people. No
wonder her father goes ballistic when she gives him trouble about
marrying Count Paris; if he can't manage the women in his family, his
reputation among his fellows would suffer. Children were supposed to
obey their parents, especially in the important matter of marriage, and
Juliet is a willful child. Romeo might have gotten away with dallying
with her, but she has no choice in the matter.

Ruth Ross

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