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Home :: Archive :: 2004 :: February ::
Banned Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 15.0415  Thursday, 12 February 2004

[1]     From:   David Cohen <
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 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Feb 2004 13:07:21 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0401

[2]     From:   Alan Pierpoint <
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 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 11 Feb 2004 23:30:19 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 15.0401 Banned Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Cohen <
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Date:           Wednesday, 11 Feb 2004 13:07:21 -0600
Subject: 15.0401 Banned Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0401 Banned Shakespeare

D Bloom <
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 > writes,

 >We seem to be talking at cross purposes here. I felt that he was
 >assuming that all romantic love is necessarily heterosexual -- and I
 >guess I still do. If in the paragraph above we substituted "romantic"
 >for "heterosexual," then I would have no argument with the point. What
 >is definitive about the love of R & J is that it is romantic, rather the
 >filial or patriotic or some other kind of love. Surely this is a kind of
 >love that non-heterosexuals can have, and have to an excess that leads
 >to disaster.

For all European countries sampled, the age  of menarche has dropped to
current ages of 11, 10, or even earlier (a significant percentage of the
girls of some groups showing some signs of puberty before age 9) from
much higher ages-later teens (19th century), and who know how much later
back in the Renaissance era.  Given this fact, can we not assume that at
least Juliet (maybe Romeo too) was prepubescent at age 13, even going on
14?  If so, then her's is puppy love, intense as it may be.  Anyone
recalling his/her first puppy love (mine at age 10, well before obvious
signs of puberty) knows how consuming it can be.  But is this romantic
love?  Brain and gonadal immaturity suggest that it can't be.  My guess
is that prepubertal puppy love is qualitatively  (not just
quantitatively) different, for instance, there is urgency about being
together and touching but not merging, and there is no sense of
sacrificing oneself for one's love, for the sense of self is not fully
developed.  If puppy love is not romantic love, though it look romantic,
what is it?   Perhaps I should be asking, how should we define romantic
love vis-a-vis puppy love?

David Cohen

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alan Pierpoint <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 11 Feb 2004 23:30:19 EST
Subject: 15.0401 Banned Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 15.0401 Banned Shakespeare

Ruth,

If Juliet had "no choice" in the matter of marriage, how do we explain
lines such as I,ii,17 (in my edition) :"My will to her consent is but a
part. / And she agree . . ." and I,iii,80:  "What say you? Can you love
the gentleman?"  Juliet seems to have at least the right of refusal.
-Alan Pierpoint

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